trail system – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 11:04:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://walkonmountain.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/favicon-5-120x120.png trail system – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ 32 32 Beechwood Church will add several miles of mountain biking and a hiking trail https://walkonmountain.com/beechwood-church-will-add-several-miles-of-mountain-biking-and-a-hiking-trail/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 11:04:10 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/beechwood-church-will-add-several-miles-of-mountain-biking-and-a-hiking-trail/ TWP PARK. — Beechwood Church will provide a recreational outlet for the community on its 80-acre property in Park Township. “I think the idea came out of a desire to do more community outreach,” said general manager Marty Ryan. “We have always looked for opportunities.” This time, the opportunity will come in the form of […]]]>

TWP PARK. — Beechwood Church will provide a recreational outlet for the community on its 80-acre property in Park Township.

“I think the idea came out of a desire to do more community outreach,” said general manager Marty Ryan. “We have always looked for opportunities.”

This time, the opportunity will come in the form of a mountain biking and hiking trail. This is not the first time that Beechwood has provided space for recreational activities.

Following:ODC partners with Beechwood Church for nature-focused preschool

“We actually rent the property with most of the Stu Visser trails up to Park Township,” Ryan said. “And it’s become a real asset that a lot of people appreciate. We’ve also built upgrades, like our lodge building, which is currently used by Outdoor Discovery Centre. for their preschool program.

For the conceptualization, the church contacted the Michigan Edge Mountain Biking Association, which helps create and maintain trails statewide, including Ottawa County.

The first phase of trail construction is complete at Beechwood Church.  When completed, the four to five mile trail will be suitable for cyclists and hikers.

“We have trails through the woods that have evolved naturally,” Ryan said. “But nobody designed or planned them, so we contacted MEMBA to help us create a nice trail system.”

MEMBA President Joe Lampen has noticed a dramatic increase in mountain biking since the pandemic began.

“Generally there has been an increase over the last decade,” he said. “But the pandemic has only rapidly accelerated interest in traffic and new trail construction. We are also working on a new trail in Jamestown Township – although this one is machine-built. The Beechwood Church Trail will use volunteers and local trail designers and builders.”

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All of MEMBA’s trail systems also allow hikers.

“We still consider this to be one of the selling attributes of a natural surface trail,” Lampen said. “It’s designed for the mountain biker, but it can be used by multiple people. We have groomers that compact the snow, so it’s great for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing.”

In total, Beechwood hopes to create four or five miles of trail. The first phase of development is already complete, with just over a mile of track.

The first phase of trail construction is complete at Beechwood Church.  When completed, the four to five mile trail will be suitable for cyclists and hikers.

“We’re preparing for the next phase and hope to have it complete by late spring, early summer,” Ryan said. “We’re also looking at opportunities to maybe tie the name to a community leader or someone really active in the church.”

Eventually, Beechwood Church would like to see the trail become part of a network, connecting its line to Riley Trails and Cooper Van Wieren Park for a total of 15 miles.

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6 Spectacular National Forests for Cross-Country Skiing https://walkonmountain.com/6-spectacular-national-forests-for-cross-country-skiing/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 23:00:10 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/6-spectacular-national-forests-for-cross-country-skiing/ America’s National Forests have been attracting outdoor enthusiasts for more than a century. Today, some of the country’s most spectacular ski spots are hidden in the National Forests, especially for cross-country skiers. With everything from networks of groomed trails and high grasslands to fully staffed Nordic centers offering lessons and equipment rentals, the nation’s national […]]]>

America’s National Forests have been attracting outdoor enthusiasts for more than a century. Today, some of the country’s most spectacular ski spots are hidden in the National Forests, especially for cross-country skiers.

With everything from networks of groomed trails and high grasslands to fully staffed Nordic centers offering lessons and equipment rentals, the nation’s national forests are all brimming with winter adventures for cross-country skiers of all skill levels.

First, for a quick refresher on technique, refresh with an introduction to how to cross-country ski. Then, score the right gear, with a guide on how to buy cross-country skis for your winter getaways and the best ski brands to buy.

And, then, search for ski areas in the country’s 155 national forests. To start, here are some of the best places for cross-country skiing enthusiasts.

Monongahela National Forest, West Virginia

Groomed trails at White Grass Resort in West Virginia.

Anchored by the Allegheny Mountains, much of the central part of West Virginia’s Monongahela National Forest is at high elevation, which means that each winter the protected area is dumped with fresh powder and the snow sticks. And, under a blanket of fluffy snow, the 919,000-acre National Forest offers endless options for cross-country skiers, from unplowed forest roads and scenic drives to trail-crossed alpine meadows.

For beginners, Canaan Valley Resort and Blackwater Falls State Park are located just 6 miles from each other in the northern part of the National Forest, and both offer ski rentals and a combined 19 miles of trails. marked but not groomed. Just outside the town of Davis, the White Grass Ski Touring Center offers more than 30 miles of groomed trails garlanding the slopes of the 4,463-foot Weiss Knob. The Visitor Center’s trail system also provides access to the National Forest’s sprawling Dolly Sods Wilderness, a high-altitude plateau interwoven with 45 miles of backcountry trails.

Learn more

Sawtooth National Forest, Idaho and Utah

View of a mountain in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area in winter.

The Sawtooth National Forest offers cross-country skiers a sumptuous smorgasbord every winter. Covering a 2.1 million acre swath of central Idaho and northern Utah, the massive protected area is buttressed by five different mountain ranges. It’s also teeming with glacial valleys, offering plenty of areas to explore on skis, from networks of groomed trails to thrilling backcountry terrain.

The town of Ketchum is a strategic base camp for skiers – with plenty to offer beginners and seasoned pros alike. Just north of Ketchum, the extensive North Valley Trails network offers more than 70 miles of groomed trails for cross-country skiers in the Wood River Valley, threading through the Sawtooth National Recreation Area of ​​the National Forest. The 20-mile Harriman Trail connects the entire trail system for seasoned skiers and offers stunning views of the Boulder Mountains.

And for beginners, the Galena Lodge is an ideal starting point. Offering access to a 30-mile trail system located at the northwest end of the North Valley Trails system, the historic lodge has been a hub for cross-country skiers since the 1970s, and amenities include ski rentals , private lessons, an on-site cafe and four cozy yurts for overnight getaways.

Learn more

White Mountain National Forest, Maine and New Hampshire

Bretton Woods covered in snow in the White Mountains National Forest.

Crowned by the tallest peaks in the northeast, White Mountain National Forest is a cross-country skier’s wonderland. Spanning more than 800,000 acres in eastern New Hampshire and western Maine, the national forest is crowned by 6,288-foot Mount Washington, New England’s highest peak – and a lighthouse. for hardened ski tourers. But the national forest also offers a buffet for cross-country skiing enthusiasts. Six different Nordic Centers scattered throughout New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest strip provide easy access to over 250 miles of groomed ski trails.

For a White Mountain sampler, the Bretton Woods Nordic Center offers more than 60 miles of trails showcasing the national forest and majestic lands of historic Omi Mount Washington Resort and offers ski rentals and private lessons for novices. still mastering the kick and slide. Meanwhile, more experienced Nordic skiers can tackle the lift-accessible alpine trails surrounding Mount Stickney Hut. For a taste of the skiable backcountry of the National Forest, Appalachian Mountain Club’s Carter Notch Hut, Lonesome Lake Hut, and Zealand Falls Hut can be rented year-round. However, winter is the self-service season for visitors.

Learn more

Superior National Forest, Minnesota

Skiers on groomed trail in the Upper National Forest.

With more than 445,000 acres of surface water—including the mammoth Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness—northeastern Minnesota’s Superior National Forest is an iconic destination for summer paddlers. But, the national forest is just as attractive in winter. Proximity to Lake Superior ensures the protected area is blanketed in snow – and during the winter much of the forest is open for skiing, from snowy logging roads to pristine wilderness trails to secluded backwater lakes -country. And, while the backcountry is teeming with exploration and skiing, especially in the Boundary Waters Wilderness, towns like Ely and Grand Marais also offer convenient access to the skiable area of ​​the National Forest.

In the heart of the National Forest, the ski trails of Sugar Bush offer more than 35 miles of cruising, circling a century-old warming lodge at the edge of Sawbill Lake. However, to start with the basics, the Giant’s Ridge ski area has an extensive 35-mile network of trails for cross-country skiers – once also famous as a training ground by the US Ski Team. And, for experienced skiers with lots of cold gear, backcountry permits for the Boundary Waters Wilderness are free from early October through late April — and winter is the perfect time to see the Northern Lights.

Learn more

Green Mountain National Forest, Vermont

A breathtaking view of a mountain shrouded in clouds in the Green Mountains.

Capped by the Green Mountains, Vermont’s Green Mountain National Forest is a snowy Shangri-la for skiers. During the winter, all trails in the National Forest are open for cross-country skiing – from pristine backcountry circuits to groomed trails for beginner skiers. In addition to the alpine resorts, there are four fully equipped Nordic centers located within the protected area, as well as unmaintained backcountry routes for skiers wanting to make their first tracks in fresh powder.

For an introduction to National Forest offerings, the Mountain Top Inn & Resort in Chittenden is an idyllic launch pad — and has been attracting cross-country skiers for more than five decades. Today, the resort offers over 35 miles of groomed trails, including puppy-friendly trails. And, for an overnight getaway, there are cabins and guesthouses, as well as rooms in the resort’s main lodge. And for a longer excursion, the resort’s trail system also connects to the iconic Catamount Trail. Designed in 1982 and completed in 2008, the 300-mile ski trail crosses the entire state of Vermont, winding through the lowlands of the Green Mountain National Forest and providing access to a multitude of ungroomed forest trails, as well as to eight different backcountry areas for advanced skiers. .

Learn more

White River National Forest, Colorado

White River National Forest trails at sunset.

Home to 11 different resorts and ten different peaks above 14,000 feet (also known as the ’14ers), Colorado’s White River National Forest is renowned for downhill skiing – but the protected area of ​​2.3 million of acres is also a wonderland for cross-country skiers. For an introduction to the sprawling National Forest, just outside the town of Frisco, the Frisco Nordic Center caters to cross-country skiers of all skill levels, with rentals, introductory lessons and clinics for beginners. experienced skiers, plus 15 miles of groomed trails nestled along the shores of Dillion Reservoir.

And, for a ski trip with a bit of local history, Ashcroft Ski Touring near Aspen offers equipment rentals, lessons and ski tours, plus 20 miles of groomed runs in the Castle Creek Valley surrounding the ghost town of Ashcroft, a 19th-century silver mining town now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. From the Ashcroft Ski Touring lodge, skiers can also opt for a day trip to the Pine Creek Cookhouse for a gourmet backcountry lunch in the shadow of the Elk Mountains.

Learn more

Editors’ Recommendations






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A new mountain bike trail system is planned for the Burning Mountain area in New Castle https://walkonmountain.com/a-new-mountain-bike-trail-system-is-planned-for-the-burning-mountain-area-in-new-castle/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 07:23:20 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/a-new-mountain-bike-trail-system-is-planned-for-the-burning-mountain-area-in-new-castle/ A fall 2021 view looking west over New Castle, including Burning Mountain in the distance, where a new cycleway system is planned.Chelsea Independent/Post Independent New Castle’s iconic Burning Mountain could host the next new network of mountain bike trails. That and a new feature of the existing South Canyon trail system are the subject of […]]]>

A fall 2021 view looking west over New Castle, including Burning Mountain in the distance, where a new cycleway system is planned.
Chelsea Independent/Post Independent

New Castle’s iconic Burning Mountain could host the next new network of mountain bike trails.

That and a new feature of the existing South Canyon trail system are the subject of two separate funding applications before the Garfield County commissioners.

In 2020, a landowner in Burning Mountain, just west of New Castle, offered to work with the Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association to establish a network of trails, commissioners told Monday morning Mike Pritchard, executive director of the RFMBA.



An initial feasibility study identified potential trail alignments, including about 9 miles of trails in the first of two phases, Pritchard said.

“Views from many trail alignments include the Colorado River, I-70 and the Flat Tops to the north,” Pritchard wrote in a funding application before commissioners. “Most trails are designed for two-way foot and bicycle traffic, with directional use recommended for bicycles.”



A separate hiking trail is included in the second phase of development, Pritchard said.

Combined with the existing trail system on Bureau of Land Management property north of New Castle, the additional trails could provide a new draw for local outdoor enthusiasts and visitors, he said.

Pritchard was before county commissioners seeking two separate grants, both of which could come from the county’s Conservation Trust Fund, he proposed.

The first would be to invest $10,000 in the Burning Mountain project, the first phase of which is estimated at $255,000.

Pritchard is also working with the town of New Castle for $100,000 over two years, in addition to $60,000 in proceeds from New Castle Trails’ Rides & Reggae Festival in August this year and next.

The RFMBA would provide an additional $50,000 in foundation grants, as well as in-kind volunteer support for trail construction when the time comes.

Pritchard said his group hopes to begin construction on the trail project this year.

Additionally, RFMBA is seeking $10,000 in conservation trust funds to build a new bike park in Glenwood Springs’ South Canyon trail system.

Partial funding is already secured and carried over from previous years to build the new Alpine Slide Trail feature.

“This trail will provide a directional experience suitable for developing intermediate and advanced bike handling skills in a fun, safe, and beautiful environment,” Pritchard wrote in the second application.

The trail would be located where the old alpine slide attraction used to be – parts of which remain and will need to be removed to make way for the new bike park.

“This trail will be located adjacent to and north of the nearby landfill entrance, accessible by the existing tram trail,” Pritchard wrote.

The trail would total about 1 mile, using rocks and soil on site, as well as wood and steel elements, he said.

Cost estimates for the South Canyon project are around $80,000, he said.

RFMBA is working with the Glenwood Springs Parks and Recreation Department to develop the new trail feature.

The trail projects were among several nonprofit and Conservation Trust discretionary grant applications before commissioners on Monday as part of their first-quarter funding round.

Other demands included: Community Counts Colorado, $10,000; KSUN Community Radio, Battlement Mesa, $5,000; West Elk Trails, $3,000; New Castle Trails Rides and Reggae Support, $5,000; Roaring Fork Branch, $5,000; GlenX Career Expo, $3,000; and Youthentity, $5,000.

County commissioners are expected to decide on the various grant applications at their February 22 meeting.

jstroud@postindependent.com

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A new mountain bike trail system is planned for Burning Mountain in New Castle https://walkonmountain.com/a-new-mountain-bike-trail-system-is-planned-for-burning-mountain-in-new-castle/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/a-new-mountain-bike-trail-system-is-planned-for-burning-mountain-in-new-castle/ A fall 2021 view looking west over New Castle, including Burning Mountain in the distance, where a new cycleway system is planned.Chelsea Independent/post-independent New Castle’s iconic Burning Mountain could host the next new network of mountain bike trails. That and a new feature of the existing South Canyon trail system are the subject of two […]]]>

A fall 2021 view looking west over New Castle, including Burning Mountain in the distance, where a new cycleway system is planned.
Chelsea Independent/post-independent

New Castle’s iconic Burning Mountain could host the next new network of mountain bike trails.

That and a new feature of the existing South Canyon trail system are the subject of two separate funding applications before the Garfield County commissioners.

In 2020, a landowner in Burning Mountain, just west of New Castle, offered to work with the Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association to establish a network of trails, commissioners told Monday morning Mike Pritchard, executive director of the RFMBA.



An initial feasibility study identified potential trail alignments, including about 9 miles of trails in the first of two phases, Pritchard said.

“Views from many trail alignments include the Colorado River, I-70 and the Flat Tops to the north,” Pritchard wrote in a funding application before commissioners. “Most trails are designed for two-way foot and bicycle traffic, with directional use recommended for bicycles.”



A separate hiking trail is included in the second phase of development, Pritchard said.

Combined with the existing trail system on Bureau of Land Management property north of New Castle, the additional trails could provide a new draw for local outdoor enthusiasts and visitors, he said.

Pritchard was before county commissioners seeking two separate grants, both of which could come from the county’s Conservation Trust Fund, he proposed.

The first would be to invest $10,000 in the Burning Mountain project, the first phase of which is estimated at $255,000.

Pritchard is also working with the Town of New Castle for $100,000 over two years, in addition to $60,000 in proceeds from New Castle Trails’ Rides & Reggae Festival in August this year and next.

The RFMBA would provide an additional $50,000 in base grants, as well as in-kind volunteer support for trail construction when the time comes.

Pritchard said his group hopes to begin construction on the trail project this year.

Additionally, RFMBA is seeking $10,000 in conservation trust funds to build a new bike park in Glenwood Springs’ South Canyon trail system.

Partial funding is already secured and carried over from previous years to build the new Alpine Slide Trail feature.

“This trail will provide a directional experience suitable for developing intermediate and advanced bike handling skills in a fun, safe, and beautiful environment,” Pritchard wrote in the second application.

The trail would be located where the old alpine slide attraction used to be – parts of which remain and will need to be removed to make way for the new bike park.

“This trail will be located adjacent to and north of the nearby landfill entrance, accessible by the existing tram trail,” Pritchard wrote.

The trail would total about 1 mile, using rocks and soil on site, as well as wood and steel elements, he said.

Cost estimates for the South Canyon project are around $80,000, he said.

RFMBA is working with the Glenwood Springs Parks and Recreation Department to develop the new trail feature.

The trail projects were among several nonprofit and Conservation Trust discretionary grant applications before commissioners on Monday as part of their first-quarter funding round.

Other demands included: Community Counts Colorado, $10,000; KSUN Community Radio, Battlement Mesa, $5,000; West Elk Trails, $3,000; New Castle Trails Rides and Reggae Support, $5,000; Roaring Fork Branch, $5,000; GlenX Career Expo, $3,000; and Youthentity, $5,000.

County commissioners are expected to decide on the various grant applications at their February 22 meeting.

Senior Reporter/Editor John Stroud can be reached at 970-384-9160 or jstroud@postindependent.com.

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New mountain bike trail system in sight for New Castle’s Burning Mountain; Added planned South Canyon bike park https://walkonmountain.com/new-mountain-bike-trail-system-in-sight-for-new-castles-burning-mountain-added-planned-south-canyon-bike-park/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/new-mountain-bike-trail-system-in-sight-for-new-castles-burning-mountain-added-planned-south-canyon-bike-park/ A fall 2021 view looking west over New Castle, including Burning Mountain in the distance, where a new cycleway system is planned.Chelsea Independent/Post Independent New Castle’s iconic Burning Mountain could host the next new network of mountain bike trails. That and a new feature of the existing South Canyon trail system are the subject of […]]]>

A fall 2021 view looking west over New Castle, including Burning Mountain in the distance, where a new cycleway system is planned.
Chelsea Independent/Post Independent

New Castle’s iconic Burning Mountain could host the next new network of mountain bike trails.

That and a new feature of the existing South Canyon trail system are the subject of two separate funding applications before the Garfield County commissioners.

In 2020, a landowner in Burning Mountain, just west of New Castle, offered to work with the Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association to establish a network of trails, commissioners told Monday morning Mike Pritchard, executive director of the RFMBA.



An initial feasibility study identified potential trail alignments, including about 9 miles of trails in the first of two phases, Pritchard said.

“Views from many trail alignments include the Colorado River, I-70 and the Flat Tops to the north,” Pritchard wrote in a funding application before commissioners. “Most trails are designed for two-way foot and bicycle traffic, with directional use recommended for bicycles.”



A separate hiking trail is included in the second phase of development, Pritchard said.

Combined with the existing trail system on Bureau of Land Management property north of New Castle, the additional trails could provide a new draw for local outdoor enthusiasts and visitors, he said.

Pritchard was before county commissioners seeking two separate grants, both of which could come from the county’s Conservation Trust Fund, he proposed.

The first would be to invest $10,000 in the Burning Mountain project, the first phase of which is estimated at $255,000.

Pritchard is also working with the Town of New Castle for $100,000 over two years, in addition to $60,000 in proceeds from New Castle Trails’ Rides & Reggae Festival in August this year and next.

The RFMBA would provide an additional $50,000 in base grants, as well as in-kind volunteer support for trail construction when the time comes.

Pritchard said his group hopes to begin construction on the trail project this year.

Additionally, RFMBA is seeking $10,000 in conservation trust funds to build a new bike park in Glenwood Springs’ South Canyon trail system.

Partial funding is already secured and carried over from previous years to build the new Alpine Slide Trail feature.

“This trail will provide a directional experience suitable for developing intermediate and advanced bike handling skills in a fun, safe, and beautiful environment,” Pritchard wrote in the second application.

The trail would be located where the old alpine slide attraction used to be – parts of which remain and will need to be removed to make way for the new bike park.

“This trail will be located adjacent to and north of the nearby landfill entrance, accessible by the existing tram trail,” Pritchard wrote.

The trail would total about 1 mile, using rocks and soil on site, as well as wood and steel elements, he said.

Cost estimates for the South Canyon project are around $80,000, he said.

RFMBA is working with the Glenwood Springs Parks and Recreation Department to develop the new trail feature.

The trail projects were among several nonprofit and Conservation Trust discretionary grant applications before commissioners on Monday as part of their first-quarter funding round.

Other demands included: Community Counts Colorado, $10,000; KSUN Community Radio, Battlement Mesa, $5,000; West Elk Trails, $3,000; New Castle Trails Rides and Reggae Support, $5,000; Roaring Fork Branch, $5,000; GlenX Career Expo, $3,000; Youthentity, $5,000.

County commissioners are expected to decide on the various grant applications at their February 22 meeting.

Senior Reporter/Editor John Stroud can be reached at 970-384-9160 or jstroud@postindependent.com.

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Beginner’s Winter Hike at Fahnestock State Park https://walkonmountain.com/beginners-winter-hike-at-fahnestock-state-park/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 15:44:43 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/beginners-winter-hike-at-fahnestock-state-park/ [ad_1] Hiking all year round, even in winter, is not impossible. In fact, the solitude of a hiking trail in January and February offers its own kind of restorative benefits, but being prepared is essential. As an avid hiker and winter runner, there are a few things I can’t go without: a headlamp, microspikes, a […]]]>


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Hiking all year round, even in winter, is not impossible. In fact, the solitude of a hiking trail in January and February offers its own kind of restorative benefits, but being prepared is essential.

As an avid hiker and winter runner, there are a few things I can’t go without: a headlamp, microspikes, a paper map, a bottle of water, a hat and gloves. It is a winter survival kit that can be easily stored in a small backpack or water bag.

Here’s why: Conditions can change quickly in winter, especially with altitude. The light fades quickly at this time of year and smartphones are dying. And sometimes even familiarity with a trail can leave you in a difficult position.

During a trail run one winter, for example, I realized the sun was setting much faster than I was running. I watched the sky take on all kinds of colors, like a blue that was both beautiful and bewitching. Glancing at my phone to check the time, I saw that my battery was at 10% and I had 3 miles to go. It started to turn dark gray then dark brown, and just as my phone went off and off it turned into a Deep dark. Luckily I knew the trail as I stupidly didn’t have a headlamp or flashlight on my phone to help me make out the contours of the ground.

Now? I take all the essentials for winter hikes and leave the micro spikes and a headlamp in the glove compartment of my car to grab if conditions warrant, just in case.

Microspikes provide extra grip on trails in icy, light snow conditions and slip easily over hiking boots or running shoes. They will prevent slipping on a patch of ice or slippery rocks and make you feel like you have superpowers that will allow you to walk safely on any slippery trail or over a top layer of crusty snow. Foldable hiking poles are another smart piece of equipment to invest in to keep your footing on any hike, but especially those faced in winter.

If you like to take your time hiking, stopping for a snack, or even heading to another trail, a map is also essential for locating where you are and how to get back. While smartphones have all the trail and map apps and can help you get around some of the most remote places, batteries drain faster in the cold and cell service can be spotty in the woods.

The New York-New Jersey Trail conference offers maps and card sets for all Hudson Highland trails, including one for East Hudson Trails that specifically focuses on Clarence Fahnestock State Park, which has trails moderate enough to that beginners test their winter hiking skills. and gear.

A break from Breakneck Ridge near Cold Spring

Microspikes can fit over any style of shoe to give you traction on snow and ice.

Valeria Vechterova / Getty Images / iStockphoto

Near the village of Cold Spring are a plethora of single track trails, remnants of old iron ore mines, and stone walls that interlock with the fields and forests of Clarence Fahnestock State Park from 15 000 acres. The park is a welcome retreat from some of the more touristy and challenging treks, such as nearby Breakneck Ridge. But the park also has the same amount of splendor, just spread out along smaller peaks and longer forays through meadows and woods, alongside lakes and streams – easier terrain to navigate in winter than a rocky climb on a ridge.

While the park boasts of having 400,000 visitors a year, recently in late December with unusually hot and rainy weather, there was no one on the trail except for the occasional couple who hiked with them. his dog. Once winter arrives in the lower Hudson Valley, Fahnestock is equipped with its own Winter Park (FWP), filled with 20 kilometers of groomed trails for Nordic skiing and snowshoeing. (Updates on FWP conditions can be found here.) But the rest of its trail system also offers plenty of winter hiking opportunities.

One of the park’s iconic loops begins with the 4.9-mile-long School Mountain Road, which begins at Hubbard Lodge, a beautiful park-owned log cabin that has a butterfly garden and interpretive signs. The parking lot is located along Campbell Road, just a little north of the intersection of highways 301 and 9. From there, hikers take an old road that narrows into a single track trail, crossing several designed wooden bridges. and built by West Point Cadets.

The hike begins in a swamp with views of the Highlands and quickly heads to a wooded area, through Bull Creek, traversed balanced on steel I-beams resting on it.

Right after crossing the I-beam, the loop portion of the hike begins. Park Superintendent Evan Thompson suggests going counterclockwise (I chose reverse), but both ways there is rock climbing, views, and most importantly calm persistent, punctuated only by bird calls, the tap, tap, tapping of red-bellied woodpeckers, the gurgling of the stream and the sound of your own breath. The intricate root systems of the forest’s beech and chestnut trees line the creek and help hikers gain a foothold as they ascend the trail.

In about a mile or so you will reach your first tricky intersection where you want to stay to the right and follow the green markers that take you along a gentle climb on the Round Hill Bypass trail. This part of the hike is all wooded, with some wet areas on rocks and roots, and if it’s icy or snowy you will be happy to have your microspikes and hiking poles foldable.

Around the 2.5 mile mark, another three-way intersection could take you to longer hikes and loops and even to the Appalachian Trail which runs through the middle of the park like a loose belt. Stay on the School Mountain Trail Loop and turn right on Fahnestock Trail, which leads on the east side of Round Hill, a relatively short climb to the top of Round Hill which offers great views of West Point, Storm King and the River Hudson.

There are beautiful rock outcrops and large boulders strewn about, like someone throwing rice at a wedding, although heavier and with more geological zest. The rock faces that mark the farms and property lines weave in and out of this loop and it’s hard not to marvel at the work and manpower that had to be put into transporting, lifting , laying and stacking these rocks by hand.


The trail descends for about a mile, then flattens out, alongside the serene sounds of Bull Creek. Soon the I-beams are back in sight and it’s time to take a sharp left turn, cross the creek and head back to Hubbard Lodge.

This loop is primarily used for walking, hiking, technical running, and bird watching. The Fahnestock Conservation Area (BCA) is one of the largest areas of contiguous forest in the Lower Hudson Valley, which helps provide important staging and breeding habitat for a diverse group of species of forest birds. Some of the species most commonly seen during periods of migration include the broad-winged hawk, Acadian flycatcher, hermit lily of the valley, dewormer, and scarlet tanager.

For a variety of reasons, including potential disturbance to nesting, breeding and migrating bird species, dogs must be kept on a leash at all times.

A bite to eat after the hike

Just a 10-minute drive from Cold Spring, Doug’s Pretty Good Pub (54 Main Street) and the Cold Spring repository (1 square deposit) offer two solid options for warming up with a pint and a burger. And if you found your gear missing during the hike, upgrade to Old Souls (63 Main Street) to upgrade your winter hiking kit.

Clarence Fahnestock State Park, 1498 Route 301, Carmel Hamlet, NY 10512. Call the park offices (845-225-7207) or the FWP (845-225-3998) for snow conditions.

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The 6 best mountain biking destinations in Georgia https://walkonmountain.com/the-6-best-mountain-biking-destinations-in-georgia/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 15:00:16 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/the-6-best-mountain-biking-destinations-in-georgia/ [ad_1] In the world of mountain biking, the West Coast gets all the love. We’re not here to assert that, as the history of mountain biking has its roots firmly in Marin County, California, or Crested Butte, Colorado (depending on who you ask). We’re also not here to claim that some of the best trails […]]]>


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In the world of mountain biking, the West Coast gets all the love. We’re not here to assert that, as the history of mountain biking has its roots firmly in Marin County, California, or Crested Butte, Colorado (depending on who you ask). We’re also not here to claim that some of the best trails in the country (if not the world) call out to places like Moab, Park City, and Sun Valley. Still, you shouldn’t be sleeping on the east coast, and you above all should not sleep on the best mountain biking destinations in Georgia.

In fact, when the folks at Cannondale Bikes gave us the opportunity to test drive their latest top-of-the-line trail bike, the Scalpel SE LTD Lefty, we couldn’t think of a better way to bring the new all-carbon machine to the market. ordeal than a proper visit to all of our favorite places in the State of Peach.

Whether you’re from Georgia and just starting your journey into the world of mountain biking, or you’re a seasoned vet looking for the best places to stop on a cross-country biking trip, the Mountain biking destinations below are not to be missed.

Pinhoti and Bear Creek Trail System

mountain biking destination gerogia ellijay.

Georgia’s best mountain biker can be found in the Chattahoochee National Forest, a vast expanse of over 750,000 acres with some of the most epic views and challenging trails you’ll find anywhere on the coast. is.

The crown jewel of Chattahoochee is widely regarded as the Pinhoti and Bear Creek trail systems, which are typically combined into the infamous “Bearhoti” Loop, an approximately 18 mile ride through some of the most varied singletracks and trails. more entertaining on this side of the Mississippi. .

While in the area, don’t miss the opportunity to experience the Mulberry Gap ATV Station. This family-friendly Georgia mountain biker’s mecca nestles right up against the Bearhoti Loop and also connects cyclists with over 150 miles of trails within an approximate 50-mile radius. Mulberry Gap also offers everything from trailhead shuttles (for people who prefer to keep their climbs to a minimum) to food, beer, and even accommodations for bikers who want a memorable weekend in Georgia. North.

There is something for bikers of all disciplines here, from gravel to gravity, and if your legs need a break, the nearby town of Ellijay has no shortage of things to do, from breweries to tree houses. rental of sweets.

Learn more

Jake Mountain and Bull Mountain Trails

bend in georgia mountain bike trail.

Home to Georgia’s only IMBA EPIC rated trail, the Jake Mountain and Bull Mountain trail systems are a must-see mountain biking destination for serious enthusiasts.

Our last climb to Jake Mountain included just about anything you can imagine, from big single track descents to technical climbs, a few stretches of gravel and even a few stream crossings that we had to do a little barefoot bike ride for. to cross.

While traffic is fairly light on these well-maintained trails, be aware that they are all two-way and multi-use, so you may run into a few bikers heading in the opposite direction or even a horse or two (we passed two of them) along the way.

We also love this Georgia ATV destination as there is plenty of parking on the Jake Mountain and Bull Mountain trails as well as plenty of opportunities for hiking or car camping within walking distance of one. either land. Go early, ride all day, stay the night, then start over.

Covers stream

mountain bike trail in georgia.

One of the great things about mountain biking in Georgia is that you don’t have to drive far from the city to ride a bike if you don’t want to. Blanket’s Creek is one of our favorite examples.

Blankets Creek is pretty compact, with only about 15 miles of trails inside the park, but the variety of terrain packed into the small area is what makes Blankets truly awesome.

Inside you’ll find excellent flow trails, a unique downhill track with eminently tear-off berms, roller sections, and even a one-way gravity loop suitable for hot laps with an exciting jump line on it. along the Quehl Holler trail. It’s pretty much the perfect local trail system for people to take a ride or two during the week after work, but the quality of the trails themselves (which are meticulously maintained) make Blankets a great stopover for any ATV tour in Georgia.

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Allatoona Creek Park

best mountain biking in georgia allatoona.

Located about 30 miles northwest of Atlanta, Allatoona Creek Park is another little mountain biking oasis tucked away just off the beaten track in the town of Acworth.

We use the term ‘small’ objectively here, as Allatoona’s impressive 1,450-acre footprint is no slouch, especially since it’s perfectly wedged between a large suburban area and a public dog park.

Inside the park, you’ll find over 35 miles of excellent single-track trails, all of which are one-way but alternate every other day of the week to add variety to your runs. Similar to Blankets Creek, Allatoona gets high marks for its wide variety of terrain and difficulty levels, as well as for its incredibly well maintained trails.

Once a year, Allatoona hosts the popular ‘All-A-Toona’ race, which involves just about every aspect of the park, from extended XC sections to jump lines. You don’t have to wait for the race to experience it, and if you’re in the mood for a long day in the saddle, check out the 32 ‘All-A-Toona Loop. miles on your mountain bike trail. app of choice.

We also love that there is a small bike-park style section of the park that adrenaline junkies will certainly appreciate, which includes everything from large tables to a wooden swing in the skill area just outside the building. outside the parking lot.

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5 point trail system

best mountain biking destinations in Georgia 5 points.

Located next to the popular Cloudland Canyon State Park in Georgia, the 5 Point Trail System is an approximately 20 mile network of fast, low-difficulty single-track trails with challenging and technical sections dotted around if you know where. to look for.

The Cloudland Canyon Connector section is arguably the most popular 5-point route, and the 3.4 mile stretch from the west to the Ascalon Road trailhead is an especially enjoyable route. Where you go from there is entirely up to you, but technically you can hike these trails all the way to Tennessee if you feel like it.

Again, this area is full of multi-use trails and you are sure to come across a few hikers during the busiest times. There are plenty of less traveled routes to explore, and there is no shortage of fantastic mountain views at the top of every climb.

Jarrod’s place

jarrods place georgia mountain biking destination.
Facebook: Chez Jarrod

Honestly, all the mountain biking scene in Georgia lacks is a real bike park, but it won’t be for long.

That’s because Jarrod’s Place, which is also just outside of Ellijay’s mountain biking mecca, is slated to open to the public in spring 2022. The park is still under construction but will include everything from fast-paced trails to lowering. races and jumps of dirt. Jarrod’s Place is also planning to provide proper shuttle service to trailheads, making it Georgia’s first bike-shuttle park when it opens. The park does, however, plan to be a members-only destination, so keep an eye on its progress via Facebook or Instagram for the opportunity to claim your spot.

Learn more

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Community profile: 75-year-old retirees, pioneers of mountain biking in the Rifle area https://walkonmountain.com/community-profile-75-year-old-retirees-pioneers-of-mountain-biking-in-the-rifle-area/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/community-profile-75-year-old-retirees-pioneers-of-mountain-biking-in-the-rifle-area/ Longtime Valley resident Gary Miller at the Glenwood Hot Springs pool, where he worked as a pool manager from 1971 to 1981.Chelsea Independent/Post Independent Gary Miller lives for the outdoors. Whether he’s bouncing back roads to his favorite campsites in his 1945 Ford Jeep or zipping through the switchbacks of the Grand Hogback Trails on […]]]>

Longtime Valley resident Gary Miller at the Glenwood Hot Springs pool, where he worked as a pool manager from 1971 to 1981.
Chelsea Independent/Post Independent

Gary Miller lives for the outdoors. Whether he’s bouncing back roads to his favorite campsites in his 1945 Ford Jeep or zipping through the switchbacks of the Grand Hogback Trails on his Ibis HD3 ATV, the 75-year-old retiree has a boundless love for the adventure.

Alison Birkenfeld is Vice President of the Rifle Area Mountain Biking Association and has known Miller since 2014. Miller recently accompanied her on a trip to Mexico for a mountain biking adventure to celebrate her birthday.

“How many 75-year-olds do you know who fly to distant international destinations to ride mountain bikes? Not a lot,” Birkenfeld said. “I mean, this guy is and should be a serious inspiration to all of us as we go through the progression of life.”



Birkenfeld described Miller as the glue that holds the RAMBO team together and is not only the first to go out and have fun, but also the first to volunteer when trail maintenance is needed. One of the new trails in the Greater Hogback Trail System has been named Miller Highlife in his honor.

Mountain biking is a big part of me, and in my case, over the past 30 years, it’s constantly encouraged me to try to get fitter, to be a better rider,” Miller said. “It constantly makes me use my brain, which I’m lucky because I have (memory) issues, and it’s hard to bear.”



thirst for adventure

The desire for adventure was introduced to Miller many years ago when he reconnected with his father, Jack Roberts, who had left Miller’s mother shortly after he was born. A struggling alcoholic and not ready for children, Roberts left family in Oklahoma for the Roaring Fork Valley in the 1940s.

“He kind of felt like at some point I would join him…and I’m glad I did, because he changed my life,” Miller said.

Miller started spending her summers in Glenwood Springs to get to know her father, and being the small town it was then, everyone knew each other and everyone knew Jack Roberts.

“I went to church with him once when I first came here – and that’s no exaggeration – but when we walked into the Methodist church together and, as they do at a wedding, people turned around (started whispering), ‘Is that son of Jack Roberts? You could hear them whispering,'” Miller said.

After the small-town chatter died down, the newly-acquainted father-son duo began embarking on daily adventures. At the time, Miller was working a summer job at the Glenwood Hot Springs Resort and had mornings until 3 p.m.

“I spent the first summer of 1967 with him. … He exposed me to so many different things. He actually lived at the foot of Hanging Lake. There was a small resort there until 1969, and the highway forced it to move,” Miller said.

Gary Miller swims laps at the Glenwood Hot Springs pool where he worked as a pool manager from 1971 to 1981.
Chelsea Independent/Post Independent

“I had never been around someone like Jack Roberts. … He was someone who almost constantly had to have fun. He was interesting to be around.

It was during these summer trips to Glenwood Springs that Miller secured a full-time position at Glenwood Hot Springs and a lifetime in Garfield County. He also met his 54-year-old future wife, Monica Anderson, who was a hostess at a restaurant.

“As I graduated (from college), the General Manager of Hot Springs Lodge and Pool left after about 13 years, and they decided to hire someone to run the pool and sports store separately from the general manager,” Miller said. .

The general manager had become too overwhelmed with managing the whole complex, so in 1971 they created a new position to manage the swimming pool.

“I was very lucky, because I was 24 at the time, and it was a big job. I was very lucky to get it,” Miller said.

He continued to work in this position for the next 10 years.

Miller especially enjoyed being able to work with young adults and enjoyed watching them grow from being members of the swim team to working in various pool roles to potentially becoming lifeguards. The hiring age of its staff was as young as 14 years old.

“They didn’t necessarily have to be a good swimmer as long as they had a good attitude,” Miller said. “They would end up being a locker room attendant, or a suit rental company, maybe a chair rental company, and then work their way up the system.”

Miller believes that’s one of the reasons he was able to build such a reliable staff of lifeguards – they knew they could be lifeguards once they got off the swim team.

When Miller started working for the company, the pool didn’t have lifeguards on duty during the day – only after school and on weekends, simply because the demand wasn’t there, and most rescuers at the time were still young. school.

“They hired me to go around the pool, and I did, but eventually I came up with a program with a budget on what it would cost to keep the pool, and that’s what that’s when we started keeping the pool during the day on weekdays,” Miller mentioned. “We had to start hiring adults and students.”

Over the years, the health department began requiring that there be one guard on deck for every 50 people in the water, except for the therapy pool.

New chapter

After a decade of managing the pool, Miller and his wife decided to take the plunge and open a retail store. He left Glenwood Hot Springs and the two opened Miller’s Dry Goods in downtown Rifle.

“I really felt, even at 24, that I was getting a bit too old for the job because it involved so many young people. The oil shale boom was happening in Rifle at that particular time, so we bought an existing store,” he said.

The Millers wanted something already established, so they bought a store that had opened in downtown Rifle in 1914. They bought it in 1981, and very quickly business boomed.

“We had an incredible amount of business; we were even open at night a few days a week,” Miller said.

Exactly a year after buying the business and six months after buying a new home, Exxon pulled out of its oil shale operations in western Garfield County – an event that would come to be known as Black Sunday .

“Our business got horrible, but we survived it and got through it,” he said.

They drastically cut expenses, had only a few employees, and were careful about what they bought and fine-tuned inventory.

“It was a tough time and it would have been easier to bail out,” Miller said.

A few years later, they purchased Anderson’s Clothing from Monica’s parents in downtown Glenwood Springs.

“I’ve always loved old downtowns, the more quirky the better,” Miller said. “I got very involved in the community. I would never run on anything political, because I thought it might be detrimental to my store, but I have been involved at the retail level on many committees.

He was soon elected chairman of Rifle’s Retail Merchants Committee, where he was honored to serve because he felt like an outsider from Glenwood Springs.

“Basically a drying rack”

Miller was the sports store buyer in Glenwood Hot Springs and had industry experience and contacts and knowledge of the market.

“I’m basically a clothes horse,” he admitted. “I even kept track of what I wore in high school; it was a little obsessive with me. I have always loved fashion. I like design work, cool cars, cool architecture. …it has always fascinated me.

Miller quickly discovered that owning a clothing store in a small town introduced you to a lot of people. He got used to spending more than an hour at the grocery store because he inevitably ran into someone he or his wife knew.

“A small retail store in a small town involves you in the community,” Miller said. “You almost have no choice, but it’s good for you. It’s good to be active in the community.

Shop closure

The Millers decided in early 2020 to close shop, a decision that is mostly down to age, but also lost a battle against the online shopping industry.

“Amazon was just killing us, absolutely killing us,” Miller said. “Once they started doing free freight, we were done. Our business plummeted to the point that we knew we had to get out.

They liquidated the store and sold the building.

Although they encountered bad timing shortly after opening the business in 1981 with the departure of Exxon, they lucked out closing the store just two months before COVID-19 shut down the stores. stores across the country.

“My last day of work was January 11; then in March we all knew what was hitting us,” Miller said. “By the time March came around and we had been retired for maybe six weeks, it was major and it would have killed this store.”

retirement life

What does he like about western Garfield County? Accessible public lands and mountain bike trails so close to Rifle.

“Gary’s enthusiasm for the mountain bike trails in the Rifle area over the years is a big part of how we got here today,” Birkenfeld said. “Without his passion, drive and enthusiasm for adventure cycling in our region and the network of bike-loving friends he has made over the years, I’m afraid to say, but the trails may not exist as of now.”

He also volunteered for many years at the Ute Theater in Rifle, although he took a hiatus due to concerns over COVID-19. He plans to return soon as a volunteer usher at small shows.

Forty years after working for Glenwood Hot Springs, Miller reconnects with the kids he hired to work for him.

“Some of them comment very well on my management abilities during those days, and even though I was very strict, they admire that they knew the guidelines and followed them. It was a very good group,” he said.

As he reflects on his life, one of his greatest accomplishments is raising his son, Wade, who is a well-known sailboat captain in Florida. He also credits his quick wit to the active lifestyle he continues to lead.

“I am 75 years old. You’re not supposed to be together forever, but at least I’m in good shape,” Miller said.

Visual reporter Chelsea Self can be reached at 970-384-9108 or cself@postindependent.com.

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Opinion: Regarding “Orange County Panel Hears Gripes on Mountain Biking Mishaps” https://walkonmountain.com/opinion-regarding-orange-county-panel-hears-gripes-on-mountain-biking-mishaps/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 21:46:55 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/opinion-regarding-orange-county-panel-hears-gripes-on-mountain-biking-mishaps/ [ad_1] By Brian Colclough This‘it’s sad that hikers and cyclists feel like they’re pitted against each other and that a certain level of “execution ”is considered the logical answer. Yes, we need more rangers and we need more good stewards in the hiking and biking community, but any dream that the app will solve the […]]]>


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By Brian Colclough

Thisit’s sad that hikers and cyclists feel like they’re pitted against each other and that a certain level of execution ”is considered the logical answer. Yes, we need more rangers and we need more good stewards in the hiking and biking community, but any dream that the app will solve the real problem is just a “dream”.

Please read in the the voice of the movie trailer “itIt’s better this way: what if I told you that there are places where hikers and cyclists can live together in peace and harmony. What if I told you that we are places with safe, well-maintained hiking and biking trails. Would you believe me if I told you it was right in our backyard in Orange County?

For those of us who love the outdoors and hike and bike, we know the truth. The truth is that despite our beautiful surroundings and the ability to go out roughly 365 days a year, Orange County lags far behind other communities when it comes to having a vision and a strategy to enjoy the fuel. air and build and maintain specially designed trails. Specially developed trails and more of them will lead to a better and safer experience for all hikers and cyclists.

I’m sure someone reading this and maybe even someone from OC Parks or the OC government is saying well, wait a minute …. Our # 1 priority is ecological preservation and # 2 recreation. Ito state that this is an easy and practical excuse to explain why we do nott have a more robust and appropriate trail system that meets the needs of the community. The reality is that hes about preservation “until a builder comes up with a sufficiently large check, then preservation is thrown out the window with the the frog preservation signs – you know you’ve seen them – and the bulldozers are escorted like celebrities down the red carpet.

Id encourage leaders to put their personal opinions aside and ask themselves how and why other communities eclipse Orange County when it comes to boasting about the best hiking and biking trail systems? Orange County isn’t even close. Bonita, California, Boulder, Colorado, Bentonville, Ark., And King County, Washington, are just a few examples of how communities across the country are taking action and their communities thriving on it.

Hikers and cyclists using the trails are not the problem. And although yes, there are bikers who voluntarily post the rules and do notDon’t be careful, there are also reckless hikers, who wear full helmets, walk on the wrong side of a trail, and walk three or four people the full width of the trail creating potentially problematic situations. Rather than point fingers and blame each other, the right thing to do is expand to meet demand. Just as we are widening highways, local streets, and even adding larger bike lanes, the common sense approach is to expand.

Until Orange County and the surrounding communities are willing to have more purpose built trails, hikers and cyclists will be forced to use the same trails. Thiss separation that will make the trails more enjoyable and safer for everyone.

If you want to see what safe, well-maintained trails look like and see communities taking action, please follow the links below:

Bonita CA Sweetwater Bike Park: https://www.sdparks.org/content/sdparks/en/park-pages/SweetwaterBikePark.html

Boulder CO: https://bouldercolorado.gov/parks-rec/valmont-bike-park

Bentonville AR: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yO17nzId6xI&feature=emb_logo

King County WA: https://www.kingcounty.gov/services/parks-recreation/parks/trails/backcountry-trails/duthie-hill.aspx

Boone NC: https://www.exploreboone.com/things-to-do/attractions/rocky-knob-park/

Saint-Louis MO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpdXJBI-96w

Brian is a resident of Rancho Santa Margarita.

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Festivals, skiing and other fun events https://walkonmountain.com/festivals-skiing-and-other-fun-events/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 21:20:47 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/festivals-skiing-and-other-fun-events/ [ad_1] November 26, 2021, 9:46 p.m.Updated 59 m ago Through: News 12 Staff Looking for a winter getaway this year? You may not have to leave the state. Governor Kathy Hochul’s office has posted fun getaways for New Yorkers. Ski Grab your skis or board for an incredible getaway in one of the more than […]]]>


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Looking for a winter getaway this year? You may not have to leave the state.

Governor Kathy Hochul’s office has posted fun getaways for New Yorkers.

Ski

Grab your skis or board for an incredible getaway in one of the more than 50 ski areas across the state. Third and fourth year ski for free to a lot of these mountains, and be sure to check out the latest Ski Association of New York Snow report for the most recent conditions.
  • Windham Mountain has invested over $ 4 million in capital improvements, including snowmaking upgrades, an eco-friendly groomer, redevelopment of the children’s learning center and a new “Magic Carpet” treadmill.
  • Holiday Valley in Ellicottville installed the Yodeler Express, a high-speed detachable quad chairlift that helps beginners, allowing for increased efficiency – carrying 2,400 people per hour to the 2,000-foot summit.
  • Catamount Mountain Resort in Hillsdale has made significant improvements to its snowmaking system, installed two new chairlifts, and added new food and beverage options to the base area.
  • Whiteface in Wilmington has a new SkyTrac quad, continued Phase II of its three-phase snow improvement project (including nearly 30,000 feet of replacement snow pipe) and completed renovations to its Cloudsplitter gondola.
  • Bristol Mountain in Canandaigua has added a new trail called Polaris to its Galaxy Lift Pod, improved its snowmaking capabilities and installed Axess Smart Gates on all lifts so skiers and cyclists can access the mountain with their Bristol Gateway Cards .
  • Oak Mountain at Speculator has doubled its snowmaking capacity, replaced its T-Bar Bunny Hill with a Sunkid ski lift and added new skis and snowboards to its “Rossignol rental fleet”.

Celebrate winter and history

Winter festivals are among the most popular annual events in New York City:

  • Celebrate Harriet Tubman’s 200th birthday by visiting her home in Auburn, as well as the surrounding communities of Cayuga County. Special activities during Harriet Tubman Week, scheduled for March 10-15, 2022, will take place at various sites, including her home in Harriet Tubman National Historic Park, the Seward House Museum and the Fort Hill Cemetery where she is buried. Other commemorations will be announced.
  • In Seneca Falls, join the 75th anniversary celebration of “It’s a Wonderful Life” from December 8-12, where many of the cast members will gather, including the Bailey kids and their friends.
  • Ice Castles is coming to New York for the first time, with ice displays featuring LED lights and colors at the Festival Commons at Charles Wood Park in Lake George. This new winter event should be open from early January to early March, depending on the weather.
  • Also in Lake George, the Lake George Winterfest takes place from mid-December to March, and the Lake George Winter Carnival takes place every Saturday and Sunday in February.
  • LuminoCity Festival is coming to Long Island for the first time this winter. The immersive light exhibit will run at Whitney Pond Park in Manhasset until January 9.
  • Also on Long Island, the Shimmering Solstice will take place at Old Westbury Gardens through January 9, transforming the grounds into stunning light shows with music. This new seasonal event is ideal for the whole family.
  • The Holiday Market, a new series of outdoor community events, will take place on the grounds of Gallery North and the Three Village Historical Society in Setauket on Saturdays from November 27 to December 18.
  • Zoo New York, the “only zoo dedicated to animals in New York State,” hosts Winter Wonderlights on weekend evenings from November 26 through January 2. Explore the zoo at night to see it illuminated with multicolored lights.
  • Discover even more lights, holiday entertainment and new exhibits at Westchester’s Winter Wonderland Drive-Thru Holiday Light Extravaganza at Kensico Dam Plaza from November 26 to January 2.

HOLIDAY EVENT GUIDES

BREAKFAST / MEAL WITH FATHER CHRISTMAS

CHRISTMAS TREE FARM GUIDES

Cozy restaurants and artisanal drinks

Savor comfort food, sample classic New York bites, and sip locally produced craft drinks this winter.

  • Southern Tier Brewing Company has opened a new location in the Harborcenter in Buffalo, offering a full tasting room and a menu of “beer inspired” dishes.
  • Brick & Ivy is a new BIPOC-owned restaurant in Rochester that offers a unique mix of dishes, such as fried cauliflower, jerk-seared salmon and confit duck leg.
  • Embrace the chilly temperatures at one of Lake George’s ice bars, including The Sagamore’s famous Glacier Ice Bar, Adirondack Pub & Brewery’s Funky Ice Fest, and Winterfest at Erlowest.
  • Willa’s new bakery in Catskill offers a wide variety of homemade baked goods, as well as seasonal breakfast and lunch options made from local ingredients.
  • DisBatch Brewing Company, scheduled to open in December in Macedonia, is Wayne County’s premier brewery. It was started by first responders who wanted to provide the community with a place to gather and relax.
  • In Albany, Skinny Pancake, scheduled to open soon, plans to offer a variety of pancake dishes made with local ingredients.
  • The newly opened Nova Kitchen & Bar in Blauvelt, Rockland County, uses local seasonal ingredients to create innovative daily specials.

New Accommodation

After a full day of exploring, rest for the adventures of tomorrow at one of New York State’s newest or newly remodeled accommodation properties.

  • Scheduled to open in 2022, the Grand Adirondack Hotel in Lake Placid will provide a classic Adirondack stay with a sense of luxury and distinct dining experiences at on-site restaurants.
  • Located in the heart of downtown Saratoga Springs, the Spa City Motor Lodge recently completed major renovations and rebranding, adding a more modern decor with an artistic twist.
  • The recently opened Piaule Catskill offers cabins set in a forest, ideal for the ultimate escape, as well as hiking trails and an on-site restaurant and bar.
  • Beyond winter, Auberge Resorts Collection is set to open Wildflower Farms in late 2022 amid 140 serene acres in the Hudson Valley.

New and recently opened exciting attractions

With indoor and outdoor attractions, visitors of all ages can participate in the seasonal excitement.

  • Schenectady’s Mohawk Harbor welcomes a new winter experience with a 60 x 100 foot ice rink, a Beekman 1802 holiday pop-up shop, and dining options from Druthers Brewing Company, Shaker & Vine and the restaurants at Rivers Casino & Resort .
  • The Rochester Memorial Art Gallery will be presenting the exhibition Impressions of the Renaissance: Reproductions of 16th Century Masters from the Kirk Edward Long Collection until February 6. The exhibition includes 82 masterpieces by various artists, showcasing Renaissance visual culture.
  • Lark Hall in Albany has been recently restored and transformed into a concert hall, hosting a diverse mix of bands and performers.
  • The Earl Cardot Eastside Overland trail system in Gerry, Chautauqua County expanded in 2021 to include more than five kilometers of groomed cross-country ski trails.
  • At Niagara Falls State Park, admire the splendor of the Frosty Falls from all angles. For a unique perspective, Cave of the Winds takes visitors in an elevator into the Niagara Gorge to get a close, personal view of the falls from one of two open observation decks.

On the horizon

Mark your calendars for this exciting upcoming event.

  • The FISU World University Games will take place in Lake Placid and surrounding communities from January 12-22, 2023, featuring outstanding international university athletes. It is the second largest winter multisport event in the world. For those inspired by the upcoming Winter Olympics, they can head to Lake Placid to experience Olympic history at the Olympic Museum, the recently opened Cliffside Coaster or to do Olympic bobsled east of the Rockies.
For more information on new developments and other events in New York State, visit iloveny.com.

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