ski area – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 22:42:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://walkonmountain.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/favicon-5-120x120.png ski area – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ 32 32 5 reasons to go to Logan for good skiing and tips https://walkonmountain.com/5-reasons-to-go-to-logan-for-good-skiing-and-tips/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 22:42:18 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/5-reasons-to-go-to-logan-for-good-skiing-and-tips/ Estimated reading time: 5-6 minutes Spring break is knocking at your door and it’s the perfect time to take that fun family ski trip you’ve been craving. If your plans include saving money, avoiding long lines, and venturing beyond the slopes, there are a few places you should keep in mind. Two family ski resorts […]]]>

Estimated reading time: 5-6 minutes

Spring break is knocking at your door and it’s the perfect time to take that fun family ski trip you’ve been craving. If your plans include saving money, avoiding long lines, and venturing beyond the slopes, there are a few places you should keep in mind.

Two family ski resorts in northern Utah are gaining popularity as top ski destinations if you’re looking to escape the hustle and bustle of the big city slopes. First, there’s Beaver Mountain Resort, just two hours north of Salt Lake City in Logan Canyon. Famous for its wide, groomed runs, family-friendly events and low prices, Beaver Mountain is also the oldest family-friendly ski area in the country since it opened in 1939. Given its rich history and trendy atmosphere, you can count on s have fun and get your money’s worth!

Nearby is Cherry Peak, Utah’s newest ski area, just 15 miles north of Logan. Since opening in 2014, locals and visitors to Cache Valley have fallen in love with this 400-acre resort and all of its amenities, including night skiing. (There’s a lot more to do than ski here.) Aside from access to that famous Utah powder, here are a few reasons why Beaver Mountain and Cherry Peak might top the list for a fun, quick getaway. with family.

5 reasons to go to Logan for good skiing and tips
Photo: Re Wikstrom Photography

Affordability

Cherry Peak is the perfect resort for young families hitting the slopes for the first time with their $10 deal that lets you ski all day on their beginner-level Magic Carpet run. If you need ski gear, a lesson, and a pass, they also have one of the best packages in Utah. For more seasoned skiers, a full-day pass costs $45 for adults and $35 for “cherries” (kids and students). You can also save a few dollars when skiing at night. Passes are available online or in person at discounted rates.

Beaver Mountain has a similar discounted deal for beginner skiers who want to stick with an all-day beginner run. For just $15, the Surface Lift Pass gives you access to The Little Eezy and The Big Eezy lifts from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (You can check the Beaver Mountain website for specials and pricing for seniors, military, and beginners.)

5 reasons to go to Logan for good skiing and tips
Photo: Jay Dash

Unique Features and Amenities

Don’t assume that being less crowded and more affordable means these trails are less fun! Both resorts offer a fair mix of beginner, intermediate and advanced terrain to suit all abilities, but they have their own unique flavors that keep people coming back for more.

This year, Cherry Peak opened up more terrain than ever with the addition of its Summit Lift, and it doubled its snowmaking capabilities. If your feet need a little break from the skis, you can relax and enjoy the snow tubing slope. Tubes and tickets for a family of four are $35 for the day ($5 for each additional person). If you just go with a friend, the price drops to $20 for two people. Individual day passes are $11.

True to its desire to provide an authentic ski experience, Beaver Mountain does not use artificial snow machines and does not need them. The resort averages over 400 inches of fluffy powder per season – so you can rest assured you’re always skiing the real deal.

5 reasons to go to Logan for good skiing and tips
Photo: Jay Dash

Proximity to other outdoor recreation

As enticing as this powder can be, sometimes you might need a little break to carve the side of the mountain. If so, you can’t go wrong with world-class snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, or ice fishing near each of these resorts.

Large local businesses

Fancy a bite to eat? Looking for a special keepsake to remember the best trip of your life? You will find many restaurants and shops in the nearby towns of Logan and Garden City.

With the growth of short-term rental properties, the Bear Lake area now has more accommodation options than ever. A multi-night stay gives you the chance to experience the winter wonderland of northern Utah if you take a trip to Beaver Mountain to ski, or stay in Logan and visit both resorts.

“The Kitchen Sink” at Angie’s Restaurant. (Photo: Nicole Morgenthau)

Stop by for the best sandwiches in Cache Valley at Logan’s Heroes, and you can even try “cleaning the sink” at Angie’s restaurant (“Where the Locals Eat”) by devouring a huge ice cream sundae. They’ll give you a sticker to brag about, so there’s a good souvenir for you!

Fun all year round

Keep an eye on the Cherry Peak events calendar to stay on top of all the winter fun, for example, Star Wars Night and the March Madness Slalom Race.

But the excitement doesn’t end when the snow melts. Be sure to come back for the summer concert series. With an influx of Airbnb rentals in the area, Bear Lake has become a year-round destination for anyone looking for a refreshing retreat near Beaver Mountain.

Winter activities such as cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, tubing and winter fishing on Bear Lake in Garden City.
Winter activities such as cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, tubing and winter fishing on Bear Lake in Garden City. (Photo: Marc Piscotty)

Leave before the secret is out

Why wait to find out what might be your new favorite place in all of Utah? It’s time to start planning that trip to these northern Utah ski resorts today! For more ideas and inspiration, check out https://www.visitutah.com/winter.

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Skiing in Glencoe and après-ski in Glasgow: a brilliant Scottish weekend on and off the slopes | ski holidays https://walkonmountain.com/skiing-in-glencoe-and-apres-ski-in-glasgow-a-brilliant-scottish-weekend-on-and-off-the-slopes-ski-holidays/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 12:50:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/skiing-in-glencoe-and-apres-ski-in-glasgow-a-brilliant-scottish-weekend-on-and-off-the-slopes-ski-holidays/ Skiing in the sun with a view of the big mountain, dine on a cheese fondue and end the day in a luxurious hotel room with a beautiful bathtub. It may sound like alpine dreams, but you can keep your wooden chalets and picturesque Swiss valleys – I can’t afford them anyway. I get all […]]]>

Skiing in the sun with a view of the big mountain, dine on a cheese fondue and end the day in a luxurious hotel room with a beautiful bathtub. It may sound like alpine dreams, but you can keep your wooden chalets and picturesque Swiss valleys – I can’t afford them anyway. I get all of this on a ski and town trip to Glasgow. Good. Kind of.

The skiing part of the holiday actually happens at Glencoe Mountain Resort in the Scottish Highlands. I won’t try to strap in and ski past Greggs on Buchanan Street downtown. Scotland’s biggest city is currently snow-free except for the year-round snowdome at XSite Braehead, a 15-minute drive away on the M8. This is where Ellis Brigham Mountain Sports makes the dream of a car-free ski weekend in Glasgow come true.

The store has just launched a new mountain shuttle to transport winter sports enthusiasts from Braehead to Glencoe or Glenshee ski resorts every weekend, saving you the hassle of driving yourself, while reducing emissions of carbon by pooling a journey.

The bus to Glencoe follows a spectacular route through the Highlands. Photography: Stuart Kenny

The bus leaves at 7am (rental is available from 6am) and arrives in time for the first lift. You are then free to ski all day, before taking the bus back after the lifts close at around 4:30 p.m. As planned, you’ll be back in Glasgow at 7 p.m. for your après-ski, whether it’s a fondue and fine meal or a bottle of Buckie and a munchie box (an assortment tastiest and unhealthiest dishes in the world, from pizza and fries to doner meat and pakoras, available in all good Glasgow takeaways).

“A lot of our customers have told us they’ve given up their car,” Alex McAlindon, manager of Ellis Brigham in Braehead, tells me. “They’re working from home now, so they don’t need their vehicles, or they’re making a moral and environmental choice. Resorts still struggle to put cars there. A bus can take 30 cars out of the car parks.

I choose from a great selection of the latest rental demo gear, settling on a set of Salomon S/Force skis. The bus fills up with a mix of seasoned skiers, beginners and a few hikers taking a ride. The early start means a sleepy atmosphere on the scenic journey – including sunrise over Loch Lomond – but a few hours later me and my fancy skis are rolling into Glencoe via “the Skyfall route” (which featured in the film Jump).

Scottish skiing is a little hampered by the unpredictable weather, but if the wind doesn’t blow you away, the views certainly will.

Glencoe - an oasis of ice.  Hikers and skiers enjoy the tranquility of calm sunny weather at the top of Meall mountain in Bhuiridh (1108m).
Glencoe – an oasis of ice. Hikers and skiers enjoy the tranquility of calm sunny weather at the top of Meall mountain in Bhuiridh (1108m). Photograph: Murdo MacLeod/The Guardian

The mighty Buachaille Etive Mòr looms on one side of Glencoe. It’s a real mountain – the kind of sturdy, triangular beast a four-year-old would draw. Across the valley is the West Highland Way, which passes the Kingshouse Hotel and continues to Devil’s Staircase Road and Fort William.

Glencoe Mountain Resort opened in the 1950s on the northern slopes of Meall a’ Bhuiridh and is Scotland’s oldest ski area served by lifts.

The access lift takes us from the base station to the plateau over beautiful cascading waterfalls. There isn’t much snow at the base, but we’re climbing in white snow, and when the plateau comes up, it’s covered.

The resort has seen substantial improvement since being taken over by current general manager Andy Meldrum in 2009, but the elements can still take their toll. He tells me the elevators were struck by lightning last week, forcing them to rely on generators for a few days. And a new base cafe is being built to replace the one that burned down on Christmas Day in 2019.

“You just accept that sometimes things don’t go your way,” Meldrum says. “Staff and customers are so supportive, though. The skiing can be as good as anywhere in Europe. It can also be quite miserable, but you get mind-blowing conditions.

Views of Rannoch Moor from the top prove Meldrum’s point. To the west are challenging routes including Flypaper, the UK’s steepest inland run, while to the east are some of the most scenic blue runs on the continent: wide exposed slopes of Buachaille.

The clouds part as I sip hot chocolate at the Plateau Cafe, and although there’s the odd 35mph gust of wind, blowing snow in my face, it’s a glorious afternoon . Still, Meldrum says the best is yet to come in Glencoe: “We tend to have storms in January and February and then the weather sets in. We normally ski until the end of April or the beginning of May.

As with all good things, the end of the day comes too soon. During the bus ride, skiers sleep or chat throughout their day on the hill.

The Alamo Guesthouse
The Alamo Guesthouse

After dropping off our gear, my partner and I hop in a taxi and head out for an afternoon. This is where the idea of ​​the city and skiing takes on its full meaning. Glasgow is like Mayrhofen but with less oompah music and a lot more people. There are plenty of spas and saunas if you want the full alpine treatment, but perhaps more appealing is the nightlife, which is among the best in the UK. The bustling east end is home to the Barrowlands, the center of the marvelous King Tut concert hall and the legendary Sub Club.

We head to Brel, a Belgian restaurant set among the fairy lights of Ashton Lane in the glitzy West End. An excessive serving of melted cheese and beer by the mug seems like a smart choice.

Then, return to the boutique Alamo Guest House to stay in a restored Victorian townhouse on the edge of Kelvingrove Park and the famous art gallery and museum. As it falls into darkness outside, I run a bubble bath and end my night by bathing in the most restorative substance: Scottish tap water.

Scottish skiing may be unpredictable, but when it’s good, it’s great. Add a weekend in Glasgow, and it’s an absolute winner.

Accommodation at the Alamo Guest House has been provided by Visit Scotland (doubles from £76 guest rooms). The mountain shuttle (£25 round trip + booking fee) was provided and operated by Ellis Brigham Mountain Sports and run to Glencoe every Saturday and Glenshee every Sunday until the end of the season (usually until the end of April/beginning of May). Lift passes for Glenshee must be purchased in advance. Lift passes for Glencoe can be purchased on the bus. Ski or snowboard rental for day fee £25 (provide boots or rental in resort). For more information and snow conditions see Visit Scotland

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Rising costs of climate change threaten to make skiing a less diverse sport https://walkonmountain.com/rising-costs-of-climate-change-threaten-to-make-skiing-a-less-diverse-sport/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 09:29:42 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/rising-costs-of-climate-change-threaten-to-make-skiing-a-less-diverse-sport/ Representative image of a skier. Photo: Clement Delhaye/Unsplash Watching skiers compete almost entirely on artificial snow at the 2022 Winter Olympics, we found it hard not to think about climate change and what it will mean for the future of the sports industry. winter – and who will be able to participate. Ski areas are […]]]>

Representative image of a skier. Photo: Clement Delhaye/Unsplash

Watching skiers compete almost entirely on artificial snow at the 2022 Winter Olympics, we found it hard not to think about climate change and what it will mean for the future of the sports industry. winter – and who will be able to participate.

Ski areas are increasingly dependent on extensive snowmaking operations to keep their runs open as the planet warms. A few degrees of warming can mean more days of rain instead of snow and shorter seasons. This reduces operators’ revenues and increases their costs.

These costs, passed on to visitors in higher lift ticket and resort prices, directly affect who can afford to spend a day on the slopes skiing or snowboarding.

As station costs increase, these already expensive sports are likely to become more exclusive and less diverse.

Our research focuses on what is known as intersectional sustainability in sport – looking at how to ensure they are both inclusive and environmentally sustainable. For ski resorts, intersectional sustainability means recognizing that climate change may have the unintended consequence of further entrenching the sport’s lack of diversity, and proactively seeking to prevent this.

Adaptation is necessary and costly

Creating artificial snow to adapt to climate change doesn’t come cheap.

Holiday Valley, a small resort town in Ellicottville, New York, has invested more than $13 million in snowmaking equipment over the past 40 years. On top of that are the energy, labor, and plumbing costs in thousands of gallons of water per minute to run the snowmaking machines. Even if snow guns become more efficient, the overall cost remains significant.

An analysis of the outlook for Blue Mountain, a ski resort in Ontario, Canada, offers a glimpse of the future.

In the best-case scenario, if the world meets the Paris climate accord’s goal of limiting warming to less than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 F), Blue Mountain’s ski season is likely to shorten by 8% and its snowmaking efforts are expected to nearly double by 2050. The window of ideal weather conditions for snowmaking would also be reduced by 22%, meaning the resort would produce snow in less efficient conditions, which would increase the costs again. These additional costs will likely result in higher prices for lift tickets and resorts.

Small resorts may be forced into debt to finance artificial snowmaking equipment. High debt ratios have been shown to reduce the profitability of ski resorts. Some smaller ski areas have closed, leaving fewer nearby options for skiing and snowboarding in some areas and reducing competition that could help control prices.

Beach resorts are already struggling with diversity

Alpine ski and snowboard resorts are already criticized for their lack of diversity.

In 2019-20, 69% of visitors who described themselves as skiers and 61% as snowboarders identified themselves as Caucasian or white, according to Snowsports Industries of America. The organization has found that the most frequent attendees are even less diverse.

A separate survey by the National Ski Area Association found a bigger difference: 87.5% of visits to the United States this season were from people identifying as white or white, and only 1.5% were people who identifying as black or African American.

The Snowsports Industries of America survey also revealed a wealth gap. More than 63% of skiers and 55% of snowboarders had incomes over $75,000, nearly double the median income of Americans.

Some resort companies, including Aspen Snowmass and Powdr, have pledged to increase diversity and inclusion at their resorts. Powdr, for example, has community initiatives in its “Play Forever” campaign that include awarding scholarships to help people attend their camps and partnering with STOKED, a non-profit organization that mentors youth in communities. underserved who are interested in board sports.

But among several other corporate-owned ski resorts, there is a noticeable lack of diversity efforts on their corporate websites. Eight resort companies did not include any mention of diversity and inclusion or provide any evidence of initiatives supporting such efforts on their corporate websites.

The results suggest to us that the rising costs of climate adaptation will prevent many potential skiers and snowboarders from enjoying the sport.

Three tactics to improve diversity for the future

As the climate changes, management practices may also change to keep slopes accessible.

One effective strategy is to engage and partner with community organizations that focus on diversity and inclusion. By working with organizations engaged in the community, Powdr can connect with disadvantaged young people and introduce them to snowboarding and skiing, for example.

Ski resorts can also engage directly with nonprofits like the National Brotherhood of Skiers, whose mission is to develop and support athletes of color in winter sports, and underrepresented communities. on the mountain to understand how decisions related to climate adaptation can have unintended consequences. further entrench inequalities.

Resort companies can also improve their connections to diverse communities by increasing leadership diversity and creating leadership positions in charge of diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives.

By including diverse communities in the climate adaptation discussion, ski resorts have a better chance of realizing a future where snow sports are more accessible to everyone.

Brian P. McCulloughAssociate Professor of Sports Management and Director of the Laboratory for Sustainability in Sport, Texas A&M University and Lance Warwick, Graduate Student, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

This article is republished from The conversation under Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Marshall Mountain survey shows biking, hiking and skiing are priorities for the future of real estate | Local News https://walkonmountain.com/marshall-mountain-survey-shows-biking-hiking-and-skiing-are-priorities-for-the-future-of-real-estate-local-news/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 01:30:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/marshall-mountain-survey-shows-biking-hiking-and-skiing-are-priorities-for-the-future-of-real-estate-local-news/ A public survey of the future of Marshall Mountain shows that mountain biking, hiking and running, cross-country skiing, Nordic skiing and public events are top priorities for Missoul residents. The city recently released the results of a survey of 1,300 respondents, including 50 pages of public comment on what they would like to see at […]]]>

A public survey of the future of Marshall Mountain shows that mountain biking, hiking and running, cross-country skiing, Nordic skiing and public events are top priorities for Missoul residents.

The city recently released the results of a survey of 1,300 respondents, including 50 pages of public comment on what they would like to see at the property. Additionally, there were 93 participants in the stakeholder meetings.

The nearly 160-acre lot was purchased last year by a small group, Izzy Dog LLC, with plans to sell it to the city. This transaction likely won’t happen for some time, as a public purchase approval process must be completed before the land is officially in city hands.

It is currently leased by Missoula to Izzy Dog and is open to the public.

“I think the idea of ​​doing this was to try to figure out these overall goals for the property, to try to hear what Missoula thinks Marshall Mountain could or should be for residents here and visitors,” said said Nathan McLeod, Parks & Trails. design/development specialist. “We had a lot of people who were involved in this process.”

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Parks staff were blown away by the number of responses, McLeod said.

In the high to mid-mountain area, respondents said they would like to see passive/open recreation areas, followed by a high-mountain hut, backcountry campsites, and a drag lift or ski lift. a ski lift. There is an elevator on site, but no one seems to know if it works and if not how much it would cost to fix it.

Basically, respondents said that a cycling skills park, an outdoor pavilion, a snow slide/tube slide area, a beginner ski area and an outdoor stage were the top five things respondents most wanted to see.

When it comes to trails, respondents said they would like to see dedicated mountain bike trails, beginner and intermediate bike trails, easier access to rock climbing trails, and areas designated for off-road skiing. track.

There was some support for the dogs in the area, but many public comments expressed concern about the dogs, especially their droppings.

Almost all respondents expressed a preference for human-powered mountaintop access over an elevator. A question was also asked about e-bikes, which were not popular in the survey.

The US Forest Service does not allow e-bikes on its trails, but could potentially be something the city could pursue if it chooses.

“We started asking those kinds of questions and one thing we found with e-bikes is that by far the majority of people don’t want them at Marshall,” McLeod said. “It’s an example of how (this survey) will help us in the overall planning process, because we asked those kinds of questions early on.”

Many people said they would be willing to purchase a user pass, and others also said events and program fees should be used to recover some operational costs.

Most respondents to the survey were between 25 and 44 years old. A question was also asked whether respondents were affiliated with a program or service offered by a number of groups.

Over 500 respondents said they are part of Mountain Bike Missoula. More than 400 respondents said they had been part of Missoula Parks and Rec programs and nearly 350 said they were involved in some way with Five Valleys Land Trust.

Marshall Mountain has been a somewhat controversial project since its inception. A lawsuit, filed by a Missouri doctor, seeks a trial over an issue related to a buy-sell agreement with the former owner of the Marshall Mountain property.

Ownership will not change hands due to the lawsuit.

However, there is strong community support, at least among mountain bike groups and other recreational groups involved in the project. It’s unclear how the property will be paid for, but Missoula County is involved in the process, as are some nonprofit groups.

McLeod does not expect the Marshall Mountain property to be purchased and developed entirely with taxpayer dollars, he said. One group, Friends of Marshall Mountain, begins a fundraising process.

The next step for the city is to enter into a planning agreement with a company to develop plans for the site. This will include a detailed financial analysis and an operational business plan, McLeod said.

This planning process should last all summer.

“There are a lot of different potential ways. It could be operated from the perspective of where it’s entirely Parks and Recreation or the City of Missoula operating it, it could also be a hybrid where there’s has non-profit organizations.

“These are very broad questions at this point that we hope to get some clarification on as we move forward.”

Jordan Hansen would like to thank the western Montana community for embracing him and letting him tell their stories over the past five years as his stay in Missoula ends this week. He has a lot of people he would like to express his appreciation too, but first and foremost his friend and dedicated reader Chris. As always, shout out to Jordan on Twitter @jordyhansen.

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6 Spectacular National Forests for Cross-Country Skiing https://walkonmountain.com/6-spectacular-national-forests-for-cross-country-skiing/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 23:00:10 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/6-spectacular-national-forests-for-cross-country-skiing/ America’s National Forests have been attracting outdoor enthusiasts for more than a century. Today, some of the country’s most spectacular ski spots are hidden in the National Forests, especially for cross-country skiers. With everything from networks of groomed trails and high grasslands to fully staffed Nordic centers offering lessons and equipment rentals, the nation’s national […]]]>

America’s National Forests have been attracting outdoor enthusiasts for more than a century. Today, some of the country’s most spectacular ski spots are hidden in the National Forests, especially for cross-country skiers.

With everything from networks of groomed trails and high grasslands to fully staffed Nordic centers offering lessons and equipment rentals, the nation’s national forests are all brimming with winter adventures for cross-country skiers of all skill levels.

First, for a quick refresher on technique, refresh with an introduction to how to cross-country ski. Then, score the right gear, with a guide on how to buy cross-country skis for your winter getaways and the best ski brands to buy.

And, then, search for ski areas in the country’s 155 national forests. To start, here are some of the best places for cross-country skiing enthusiasts.

Monongahela National Forest, West Virginia

Groomed trails at White Grass Resort in West Virginia.

Anchored by the Allegheny Mountains, much of the central part of West Virginia’s Monongahela National Forest is at high elevation, which means that each winter the protected area is dumped with fresh powder and the snow sticks. And, under a blanket of fluffy snow, the 919,000-acre National Forest offers endless options for cross-country skiers, from unplowed forest roads and scenic drives to trail-crossed alpine meadows.

For beginners, Canaan Valley Resort and Blackwater Falls State Park are located just 6 miles from each other in the northern part of the National Forest, and both offer ski rentals and a combined 19 miles of trails. marked but not groomed. Just outside the town of Davis, the White Grass Ski Touring Center offers more than 30 miles of groomed trails garlanding the slopes of the 4,463-foot Weiss Knob. The Visitor Center’s trail system also provides access to the National Forest’s sprawling Dolly Sods Wilderness, a high-altitude plateau interwoven with 45 miles of backcountry trails.

Learn more

Sawtooth National Forest, Idaho and Utah

View of a mountain in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area in winter.

The Sawtooth National Forest offers cross-country skiers a sumptuous smorgasbord every winter. Covering a 2.1 million acre swath of central Idaho and northern Utah, the massive protected area is buttressed by five different mountain ranges. It’s also teeming with glacial valleys, offering plenty of areas to explore on skis, from networks of groomed trails to thrilling backcountry terrain.

The town of Ketchum is a strategic base camp for skiers – with plenty to offer beginners and seasoned pros alike. Just north of Ketchum, the extensive North Valley Trails network offers more than 70 miles of groomed trails for cross-country skiers in the Wood River Valley, threading through the Sawtooth National Recreation Area of ​​the National Forest. The 20-mile Harriman Trail connects the entire trail system for seasoned skiers and offers stunning views of the Boulder Mountains.

And for beginners, the Galena Lodge is an ideal starting point. Offering access to a 30-mile trail system located at the northwest end of the North Valley Trails system, the historic lodge has been a hub for cross-country skiers since the 1970s, and amenities include ski rentals , private lessons, an on-site cafe and four cozy yurts for overnight getaways.

Learn more

White Mountain National Forest, Maine and New Hampshire

Bretton Woods covered in snow in the White Mountains National Forest.

Crowned by the tallest peaks in the northeast, White Mountain National Forest is a cross-country skier’s wonderland. Spanning more than 800,000 acres in eastern New Hampshire and western Maine, the national forest is crowned by 6,288-foot Mount Washington, New England’s highest peak – and a lighthouse. for hardened ski tourers. But the national forest also offers a buffet for cross-country skiing enthusiasts. Six different Nordic Centers scattered throughout New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest strip provide easy access to over 250 miles of groomed ski trails.

For a White Mountain sampler, the Bretton Woods Nordic Center offers more than 60 miles of trails showcasing the national forest and majestic lands of historic Omi Mount Washington Resort and offers ski rentals and private lessons for novices. still mastering the kick and slide. Meanwhile, more experienced Nordic skiers can tackle the lift-accessible alpine trails surrounding Mount Stickney Hut. For a taste of the skiable backcountry of the National Forest, Appalachian Mountain Club’s Carter Notch Hut, Lonesome Lake Hut, and Zealand Falls Hut can be rented year-round. However, winter is the self-service season for visitors.

Learn more

Superior National Forest, Minnesota

Skiers on groomed trail in the Upper National Forest.

With more than 445,000 acres of surface water—including the mammoth Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness—northeastern Minnesota’s Superior National Forest is an iconic destination for summer paddlers. But, the national forest is just as attractive in winter. Proximity to Lake Superior ensures the protected area is blanketed in snow – and during the winter much of the forest is open for skiing, from snowy logging roads to pristine wilderness trails to secluded backwater lakes -country. And, while the backcountry is teeming with exploration and skiing, especially in the Boundary Waters Wilderness, towns like Ely and Grand Marais also offer convenient access to the skiable area of ​​the National Forest.

In the heart of the National Forest, the ski trails of Sugar Bush offer more than 35 miles of cruising, circling a century-old warming lodge at the edge of Sawbill Lake. However, to start with the basics, the Giant’s Ridge ski area has an extensive 35-mile network of trails for cross-country skiers – once also famous as a training ground by the US Ski Team. And, for experienced skiers with lots of cold gear, backcountry permits for the Boundary Waters Wilderness are free from early October through late April — and winter is the perfect time to see the Northern Lights.

Learn more

Green Mountain National Forest, Vermont

A breathtaking view of a mountain shrouded in clouds in the Green Mountains.

Capped by the Green Mountains, Vermont’s Green Mountain National Forest is a snowy Shangri-la for skiers. During the winter, all trails in the National Forest are open for cross-country skiing – from pristine backcountry circuits to groomed trails for beginner skiers. In addition to the alpine resorts, there are four fully equipped Nordic centers located within the protected area, as well as unmaintained backcountry routes for skiers wanting to make their first tracks in fresh powder.

For an introduction to National Forest offerings, the Mountain Top Inn & Resort in Chittenden is an idyllic launch pad — and has been attracting cross-country skiers for more than five decades. Today, the resort offers over 35 miles of groomed trails, including puppy-friendly trails. And, for an overnight getaway, there are cabins and guesthouses, as well as rooms in the resort’s main lodge. And for a longer excursion, the resort’s trail system also connects to the iconic Catamount Trail. Designed in 1982 and completed in 2008, the 300-mile ski trail crosses the entire state of Vermont, winding through the lowlands of the Green Mountain National Forest and providing access to a multitude of ungroomed forest trails, as well as to eight different backcountry areas for advanced skiers. .

Learn more

White River National Forest, Colorado

White River National Forest trails at sunset.

Home to 11 different resorts and ten different peaks above 14,000 feet (also known as the ’14ers), Colorado’s White River National Forest is renowned for downhill skiing – but the protected area of ​​2.3 million of acres is also a wonderland for cross-country skiers. For an introduction to the sprawling National Forest, just outside the town of Frisco, the Frisco Nordic Center caters to cross-country skiers of all skill levels, with rentals, introductory lessons and clinics for beginners. experienced skiers, plus 15 miles of groomed trails nestled along the shores of Dillion Reservoir.

And, for a ski trip with a bit of local history, Ashcroft Ski Touring near Aspen offers equipment rentals, lessons and ski tours, plus 20 miles of groomed runs in the Castle Creek Valley surrounding the ghost town of Ashcroft, a 19th-century silver mining town now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. From the Ashcroft Ski Touring lodge, skiers can also opt for a day trip to the Pine Creek Cookhouse for a gourmet backcountry lunch in the shadow of the Elk Mountains.

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Mountain bike park is coming to Lee Canyon, slated to open in August https://walkonmountain.com/mountain-bike-park-is-coming-to-lee-canyon-slated-to-open-in-august/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 21:26:18 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/mountain-bike-park-is-coming-to-lee-canyon-slated-to-open-in-august/ LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — Mountain biking trails are being developed in Lee Canyon, with three trails expected to be open by August, according to a Tuesday news release. A mountain bike park being designed by Gravity Logic, which has already developed parks in Oregon and Vermont, will take advantage of the Bluebird chairlift to take […]]]>

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — Mountain biking trails are being developed in Lee Canyon, with three trails expected to be open by August, according to a Tuesday news release.

A mountain bike park being designed by Gravity Logic, which has already developed parks in Oregon and Vermont, will take advantage of the Bluebird chairlift to take riders up the mountain. The park will offer a mix of beginner, intermediate and advanced trails.

More trails are expected to be added in the fall, and by the project’s completion in 2023, the mountain will have 12 miles of downhill mountain biking trails. A map provided by Lee Canyon shows where the trails will be built:

“The Lee Canyon Bike Park is monumental for Las Vegas. Our summers are longer and hotter, but there are far fewer mountain bike trails up high than down in the valley,” says Keely Brooks, climatologist and president of the Southern Nevada Bicycle Coalition.

“The Las Vegas cycling community also cares deeply about environmental protection. Knowing that we can ride trails designed to minimize impact is a big win,” said Brooks.

Riders will access the trails from the Bluebird chairlift, with lift operators loading and unloading bikes onto chairs separately from guests.

The trails will give Lee Canyon another attraction when it’s not ski season. It will also expand opportunities to lands where bikers will be welcome. Many hiking trails in the Spring Mountains are in the wilderness, where bicycles are prohibited.

“Our bike fleet will focus on creating memorable first-time mountain experiences while meeting the needs of seasoned riders,” said Dan Hooper, general manager of Lee Canyon.

“We are proud of the time we have invested and the knowledge we have acquired. This development can serve as a roadmap for responsibly developing managed recreation areas,” Hooper said.

And it’s a substantial investment – beyond the cost of creating trails. Lee Canyon is also providing $250,000 to fund research at UNLV on the Mount Charleston blue butterfly, which lives in only a handful of Mount Charleston’s alpine meadows. This is part of a settlement with the Center for Biological Diversity that opened the door to the advancement of the mountain bike park.

The blue butterfly of Mount Charleston. (Photo: Patrick Donnelly / Center for Biological Diversity)

“We are thrilled to have reached an agreement that both protects these butterflies and funds research to put them on the path to recovery,” said Patrick Donnelly, Nevada State Director at the Center. “This agreement shows that conservation groups and private parties can work together to ensure that recreation does not come at the cost of the loss of endangered species.”

The research will deepen the biology, habitat and conservation of the butterfly.

The species was protected under the Endangered Species Act in 2013. One of its population strongholds is on the ski slopes of Lee Canyon Ski Area, according to Donnelly.

“Activists and scientists have fought for years to prevent the Mount Charleston blue butterfly from becoming extinct,” Donnelly said. “This agreement gives these special little butterflies the best chance of recovery. We hope this will trigger further actions by the Forest Service to limit the threats that recreational use poses to Mount Charleston.

If you’ve never been to Lee Canyon, you can get there from US Highway 95 northwest of Las Vegas. It’s about 50 miles from town. There is also a scenic route that connects Kyle Canyon and Lee Canyon.

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7 Cross-Country Skiing + Snowshoeing Adventures in Northern California https://walkonmountain.com/7-cross-country-skiing-snowshoeing-adventures-in-northern-california/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 16:11:08 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/7-cross-country-skiing-snowshoeing-adventures-in-northern-california/ When the snow begins to fall, the promise of downhill skiing and snowboarding takes us into the mountains. But winter sports don’t stop on the slopes. This year, why not experience winter a little differently with a snowshoeing or cross-country skiing adventure. In these Northern California destinations, you’ll find all the snowy beauty and thrilling […]]]>

When the snow begins to fall, the promise of downhill skiing and snowboarding takes us into the mountains. But winter sports don’t stop on the slopes.

This year, why not experience winter a little differently with a snowshoeing or cross-country skiing adventure. In these Northern California destinations, you’ll find all the snowy beauty and thrilling activity of sports’ sexier cousins, without the high price tag and obnoxious crowds. All you have to do is rent the hardware; the Sierras will do the rest.


Royal Gorge – Largest XC + Snowshoe Ski Area in the United States

Courtesy of Pixabay/CC

In the largest cross-country skiing and snowshoeing area in the country, 92 trails are spread over 6,000 acres of wilderness in the northern Sierra. Just over half of them, or nearly 60 miles, are groomed and tracked for easy gliding, while an additional 22 miles of trails are specifically for snowshoers of all skill levels. There are even dog-friendly options for both varieties of snow sports. Epic views are given here, and there are eight heated cabanas strategically placed on the grounds for when you want a minute to lay back and enjoy it all. Lessons and rentals are available on site. Passes range from $10 to $40 per day.

// 9411 Pahatsi Road (Soda Springs), royalgorge.com

Yosemite National Park – Badger Pass Ski Area Nordic Center


Glacier Point Half Dome, Yosemite

(Courtesy of Mitch Barrie/Flckr/CC)

If you’ve never ventured to Yosemite in the winter months, you’re in for a treat. Not only are the crowds a fraction of their summer size, but, soothed by the snow, the valley takes on a breathtaking magical quality that the sunny summer skies simply cannot awaken. There are a few different trail options open to snowshoers and cross-country skiers. Hike through the century-old trees of the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias near the park’s south entrance, view the granite peaks of Yosemite Valley or Dewey Point, or peek into the Merced River Canyon from the Clark Range View Trail near the entrance to Big Oak Flat. If your snowshoe confidence needs a little work, guided 1.5-mile excursions are brewing at Tenaya Lodge, where snowshoes are also available for rent. The Badger Pass Ski Area Nordic Center also offers snowshoe and cross-country skiing rentals and lessons.

// 9035 Village Dr, (Yosemite Valley), nps.gov/yose

Mount Shasta Nordic Center


Mount Shasta.

(Courtesy of Harold Litwiler/Flckr/CC)

There are over 14 miles of groomed cross-country ski trails, as well as an almost endless supply of (ungroomed) backcountry terrain waiting on the slopes of Mount Shasta. The former is supported by the Mount Shasta Nordic Center, which offers rentals, lessons, and a detailed trail map with options for beginners, intermediate, and expert skiers (for a real challenge, try the Ernie’s Stairway to Heaven Loop of 2.3 miles). ). Of these, Sand Flat, Bunny Flat and Castle Lake are great for snowshoeing and skiing. Day passes range from $15 to $25 for adults and $10 to $17 for those 70 and older. Juniors 17 and under ski and snowshoe free.

// 765 Mt Shasta Blvd (Mt. Shasta), mtshastanordic.org

Northstar, Truckee – Cross-Country Skiing, Telemark + Snowshoe Center


Northstar Resort, Truckee.

(Courtesy of Leijurv/CC)

Northstar is one of the more expensive options for a day of snowshoeing and cross-country skiing ($57/adult, $44/kids 12 and under), but its vast network of mid-mountain trails is well worth the dough. additional. The resort has over 21 miles of them, many with outstanding views, plus a handful of trailside wilderness warming huts where hot chocolate and tea are always being brewed. Well-equipped cross-country, telemark and snowshoe center offers lessons and equipment rentals in both sports, plus fat bikes and pedal-assist e-bikes, telemark workshops and excursions guided on snowshoes to observe the stars after dark.

// 5001 Northstar Dr (Trucker), northstarcalifornia.com

Cross Country Skiing + Snowshoeing Around Tahoe


Tahoe Meadows.

(Courtesy of Mitch Barrie/Flckr/CC)

There are several ways to XC and snowshoe in Tahoe. For world-class groomed runs, head to Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area, a resort with options for skiers and snowshoers of all skill levels that also offers lessons, clinics, and equipment rentals ($36/ adult, free for children under 19 and over 70) . For something a little more wild and free (literally), head to the sections of the Tahoe Rim Trail between Tahoe Meadows and Chickadee Ridge, Kingsbury North to Castle Rock, or Brockway Summit to Picnic Rock. Another affordable option ($10/vehicle) awaits in the Spooner Backcountry in Nevada’s Lake Tahoe State Park, where groomed scenic trails lead from the south side of Spooner Lake to Spooner Meadow and from North Canyon at Lake Marlette.

// Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area, 925 Country Club Dr (Tahoe City), tahoexc.org; various access points for Tahoe Rim Trail, tahoerimtrail.org; Spooner Lake, access by highways 50 and 28, parks.nv.gov

Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Park – Snowshoeing at Pear Lake


Pear Lake Winter Cabin.

(Courtesy of Sequoia Parks Conservancy)

At Sequoia Kings Canyon, the air is crisp, the powder is fresh, and the views are outstanding. There are tons of trails winding through the park’s woods, including at the base of its most famous residents at Grant Grove and Giant Forest. Trail maps are available at all visitor centers and snowshoes are available to rent at Lodgepole Market or the Grant Grove Gift Shop. If you have the skills, Sequoia Kings Canyon is also open for overnight ski and snowshoe tours with a wilderness permit. Ski or waffle the steep six-mile trail to Pear Lake to spend the night in the park’s adorable Winter Cabin, a rustic cabin with a pellet stove that sleeps up to 10 people (reservations prerequisites required, but the hut is temporarily closed for the 2021-22 ski season).

// 47050 Generals Highway (Trois-Rivières), nps.gov/seki

Mammoth Lakes – Tamarack Cross Country Ski Center


Cross-country skiing at Mammoth Lakes.

(Courtesy of Mitch Barrie/Flckr/CC)

At Mammoth Lakes on the eastern slopes of the Sierra, the snow is just as deep and powdery as Tahoe with a fraction of the crowds. On its best snowshoeing and cross-country skiing trails, you’ll find breathtaking vistas, frozen lakes and peaceful forest kingdoms of pines, firs and junipers. Explore Mammoth’s iconic skyline with minarets on the gently sloping, beginner-friendly Minaret Vista route, which begins at the main lodge and climbs from 8,909 feet to 9,265 feet in approximately 2.5 miles. In the Mammoth Lakes Basin, a variety of trails accessible via the 2.5-mile Lake Mary Winter Public Access Corridor criss-cross the landscape. Although skiers need a pass, snowshoers can access the groomed main trail, Panorama Dome loop, and other routes for free. Rental gear and trail maps are available at the Tamarack Cross-Country Ski Center and in town stores.

// 163 Twin Lakes Road (Mammoth Lakes), mammothmountain.com

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Group celebrates 40 years of outdoor empowerment and skiing | Montana News https://walkonmountain.com/group-celebrates-40-years-of-outdoor-empowerment-and-skiing-montana-news/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 15:10:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/group-celebrates-40-years-of-outdoor-empowerment-and-skiing-montana-news/ [ad_1] By LIZ WEBER, BOZEMAN’S DAILY CHRONICLE BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) – Karla Cartwright and her son Weston weren’t sure what to expect when they first attended Big Sky Kids Camp in Eagle Mount, designed for children with cancer and their families, in 1993. For 10 days, Weston spent time with other outdoor campers, rafting the […]]]>


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By LIZ WEBER, BOZEMAN’S DAILY CHRONICLE

BOZEMAN, Mont. (AP) – Karla Cartwright and her son Weston weren’t sure what to expect when they first attended Big Sky Kids Camp in Eagle Mount, designed for children with cancer and their families, in 1993.

For 10 days, Weston spent time with other outdoor campers, rafting the Yellowstone River, exploring Yellowstone National Park and living beyond his cancer diagnosis.

“My son loved it and found great strength in it. And I did too, ”Cartwright told the Bozeman Daily Chronicle. “… You didn’t remember you had cancer. You didn’t remember you were sick. You don’t remember going back and forth (for treatment).

Cartwright and his son returned to the ranch outside of Big Sky, MT each summer to attend camp until Weston’s death in 2000.

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“You grow up, you learn, you feel loved. You feel loved, ”Cartwright said of herself and her son at camp. “… It gives you that strength where you know you can go on. “

With Eagle Mount Camp, children and young adults can experience outdoor recreation in a setting that includes medical supervision and support. The camp is just one of many programs offered by Eagle Mount, focused on their goal of accessible and adaptable recreation for all.

“What Eagle Mount really does is make all of our backyard activities for everyone and anyone who wants to recreate themselves in these spaces,” said Kevin Sylvester, executive director of the association with purpose. non-profit.

Founded in 1982 by Robert and Greta Mathis, Eagle Mount will celebrate its 40th anniversary in 2022. The association was launched with its ski program which offered lessons and trips to people with physical, developmental or cognitive differences.

It has since grown to include an array of recreational activities, camps and events including swimming, horseback riding, rafting, rock climbing, cycling and horticulture. Over the past year, its family outreach program has grown to include retreats for guardians and siblings.

Each year, about 1,000 participants and a similar number of volunteers participate in Eagle Mount programs, many of whom register for more than one of the activities, Sylvester said. There are approximately 25 full-time and part-time employees.

Although camp participants are no longer allowed to return each year, Cartwright said that by the time her son entered the program, there was no limit. Weston wanted to participate every year.

Cartwright got involved in volunteering with the Big Sky Kids Camp in Eagle Mount about a decade after her son died. For Cartwright, she said it was a natural progression to be a family member participating in the volunteer camp from 2011 to 2019.

“I think people were pretty shocked to see me there because I was supposed to be in mourning, but I wanted to give back because they had given us so much,” she said.

Since her first camp experience, Cartwright said she remains in awe of the commitment and dedication of all the volunteers.

“I think Eagle Mount wouldn’t survive all of these years without the Bozeman and Big Sky communities,” Cartwright said. “They go above and beyond.”

Sylvester said it was “humiliating” to think of the “tens of thousands” of volunteers who have given their time to Eagle Mount, including those who have consistently volunteered for the past four decades.

“I think volunteers are the backbone of Eagle Mount,” Sylvester said.

While building a community of volunteers may not be the mission of the nonprofit, it has become a “beautiful side mission,” said Pearl Nixon, Chief Financial Officer of Eagle Mount.

“Since the early 1980s there were very few very dedicated staff and volunteers who were willing to learn a lot and teach other volunteers to fill this community,” Nixon said.

While they don’t have exact numbers from the early days of the nonprofit, Nixon has recounted a piece of the Mount Eagle lore.

“That first winter at the Bridger Bowl they thought they might have 10 people who wanted to come ski with Eagle Mount and they ended up having 80 signed up,” she said.

The skiing program, both at Bridger Bowl Ski Area and Big Sky Resort, might be one of the most visible aspects of Eagle Mount.

“Everything we do at Eagle Mount is a different tool for the same end – connectivity, empowerment and joy,” said Patrick Quinn, Bridger Bowl Ski Program Director at Eagle Mount.

Quinn, who has been on the Eagle Mount staff for three years, was a volunteer before that. As a ski instructor at Big Sky Resort, Quinn said he would regularly see Mount Eagle participants and volunteers hitting the slopes for their lessons.

“They were having so much fun,” Quinn said. “It was very magnetic. It draws you in when you see that you can be a part of that fun.

In his early days as a volunteer, Quinn remembers one lesson in particular when working with a student who communicated non-verbally. Quinn, another instructor, and the student were on a chairlift after the student had a successful ski lesson.

“He looks at me and laughs like I said the funniest joke,” Quinn said.

Soon Quinn and the other instructor couldn’t help but laugh too.

“It became this triangle of laughing at each other. It was just a real moment of happy connection, ”Quinn said. “It’s those connections to people that really make us feel like it’s a refreshing part of the world to work in.”

Quinn estimates that the ski program has about 400 volunteers for this season.

“It’s really about how to create a world in which these interactions and learning can be multidirectional,” Quinn said.

The ski program includes the Bridger Bowl, destination lessons and vacation experiences at Big Sky Resort, and cross-country skiing and snowshoeing at Crosscut Mountain Sports.

The Bridger Bowl ski program is more local, Quinn said, with participation from area school districts. He estimates that around 300 students participate in the Bridger Ski Program, with each student receiving eight lessons per season. Volunteers engage in the eight-week, two-day training program before the start.

Quinn said many volunteers and participants remain as couples over the years and “lifelong friendships” develop.

“It’s a beautiful thing to watch, especially these new relationships,” Quinn said.

It is volunteers and community partners like Bridger Bowl, Big Sky Resort and Crosscut who grow the programs.

“Eagle Mount wouldn’t be an organization without this commitment. There is no way to recreate 400 volunteers in a staffing situation, ”Quinn said. “… There is tremendous dedication, commitment and passion on the part of our volunteers. “

To mark its 40th anniversary, Eagle Mount plans to host several events throughout 2022, including a community pool party in February and a horse show in May.

Sylvester said Eagle Mount has an eye on its next 40 years.

“How can we simultaneously honor these 40 years and also look at what the future holds in terms of keeping up with a growing community and the demands and pressures on an organization,” Sylvester said.

Eagle Mount will continue to focus on what he’s known and has always done well for: building relationships, Sylvester said.

“The relationships that are built between volunteers and participants, the relationships that are built within the community around disability awareness,” Sylvester said. “… It’s about educating the community about what the communities we work with every day and the obstacles they may face. “

Sylvester, who first logged on to Eagle Mount as a ski volunteer at Billings more than a decade ago, said the nonprofit was in the process of doing a needs assessment. participants and families.

One area that is generating a lot of interest, he said, continues to develop family awareness programs.

For Cartwright, almost 30 years after her family’s first Big Sky Kids Camp, she still reflects on the profound impact the relationships and relationships the foster families at Eagle Mount have had on her son’s life and hers.

“It’s a big family, that’s what it is,” Cartwright said. “Bob and Greta (Mathis) had no idea of ​​the power they had behind their idea and the lives of the people they would touch. If you could write everyone’s name it would be a long list of people.

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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New trails at Whitefish Mountain Resort dedicated to local ski legends https://walkonmountain.com/new-trails-at-whitefish-mountain-resort-dedicated-to-local-ski-legends/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 09:04:31 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/new-trails-at-whitefish-mountain-resort-dedicated-to-local-ski-legends/ [ad_1] Whitefish Mountain Resort unveiled the new 8 chair on Saturday, after dedicating two of the Hellroaring Basin’s newest runs to local ski legends. The teams spent the summer and fall moving Chair 8 higher up Big Mountain, using a helicopter to hoist each tower into place. The resort invested more than $ 2 million […]]]>


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Whitefish Mountain Resort unveiled the new 8 chair on Saturday, after dedicating two of the Hellroaring Basin’s newest runs to local ski legends.

The teams spent the summer and fall moving Chair 8 higher up Big Mountain, using a helicopter to hoist each tower into place. The resort invested more than $ 2 million to complete the move, as part of a multi-year project to improve access to the Hellroaring Basin and create more opportunities in the area for intermediate skiers and snowboarders.

Two of the new slopes are named in honor of ski legends. Chet’s’ Stache is named after Chet Powell, who spent over 40 years at the resort. RadJack is named after the late “Rad” Jack Marcial who helped popularize telemark in the 1970s.

The lower terminal of Chair 8 is now at Grand Junction and the top is near the Toni Matt-Big Ravine split. A trip on the elevator takes about seven minutes and covers 1,082 vertical feet.

“We are excited to be completing this project as it allows guests to spend more time running in the Hellroaring Basin, while still maintaining easy access to the front of the mountain,” said Dan Graves, CEO of Whitefish Mountain Resort . “It also allows us to open the pool earlier in the season, as we won’t wait for the snow to accumulate at the lower elevation where the bottom of the lift was.

In addition to reclassifying sections of Hell Fire, the station added six new trails to the pool in 2020. These are Wing and a Prayer (double black diamond), Short but Sweet (blue square), Pat’s Ride (black diamond) ), Lacy Lane (blue square), Chet’s’ Stache (black diamond) and RadJack (black diamond).

The Chet’s’ Stache run pays tribute to Chester “Chet” Powell, who spent over 40 years in the resort, going from ski patroller to director of mountain operations before taking semi-retirement in 2019. He continued to assist Whitefish Mountain Resort with the Hellroaring Basin project through summer 2021. The name of the new trail is a nod to Powell’s impressive salt and pepper mustache.

The RadJack Trail is for the late “Rad” Jack Marcial, who helped popularize telemark skiing in the 1970s. Marcial, who passed away in 2018, moved to Whitefish in 1987 and his family has been part of the Big Mountain family ever since. .

Powell and members of the Marcial family gathered in the Hellroaring Basin on Saturday and took their first steps in Chair 8 before the crowds poured into the elevator.

“This development has been a fun process and a great way to retire,” said Powell. “It has been incredible to contribute to such a great improvement in this ski area. “

Jack Marcial’s daughter, Tori Marcial, said the new RadJack race allows her to share fond memories of her father with his own children.

“Seeing him commemorated on the mountain he raised us on gives us the opportunity to remember him and share the place with our friends and family,” Marcial said, adding that the new 8 chair improves considerably access to the Hellroaring Basin.

Graves said the complex looks forward to continually improving the Hellroaring Basin and other areas of the complex.

“We can’t think of anyone better to celebrate with these new trails than Chet Powell and Jack Marcial, who have made immeasurable contributions to the Whitefish ski community,” said Graves.

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Jersey’s largest ski resort is home to more than just skiing https://walkonmountain.com/jerseys-largest-ski-resort-is-home-to-more-than-just-skiing/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 12:30:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/jerseys-largest-ski-resort-is-home-to-more-than-just-skiing/ [ad_1] In New Jersey’s largest ski resort, skiing is the rule of the game, but it’s not the only thing guests can expect, either. It’s that time of year again: ski resorts are stepping up their snowmaking efforts and getting ready to open their doors to legions of outdoor enthusiasts ready to hit the slopes; […]]]>


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In New Jersey’s largest ski resort, skiing is the rule of the game, but it’s not the only thing guests can expect, either.

It’s that time of year again: ski resorts are stepping up their snowmaking efforts and getting ready to open their doors to legions of outdoor enthusiasts ready to hit the slopes; the snow bunnies dusted off these skis (and boards!) because the cooler temperatures of winter allow them to enjoy winter recreation again.

But some of the best ski resorts have a lot more to offer than top ski conditions. visitors can get their dose of winter activity, while still being able to stay and enjoy their trip in one place. And New Jersey’s Mountain Creek Resort is once such a place; a resort-style family experience that offers vacationers everything they need to enjoy the best winter getaways this season.


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About Mountain Creek Resort

Located in charming Sussex County, northwest New Jersey, Mountain Creek’s location in Vernon Township makes it an ideal “four-season recreation community”. Quaint and teeming with recreational opportunities throughout the year, the area is also easily accessible for those in the tri-state area looking for a city escape.

Visitors to Mountain Creek can expect a warm welcome and unparalleled hospitality; with a number of accommodations nearby and on site that make for an unforgettable vacation and a myriad of activities for the whole family.


It’s time to hit the slopes

In early December, Mountain Creek is making snow and preparing to open for its 2021-2022 season. However, due to fluctuating winter temperatures in the northeast, there is currently no opening date, although visitors can certainly plan for an epic season when the resort Is it that open to the largest ski area in the region. Below is some information for those looking to head to Mountain Creek for skiing and windsurfing this winter.

  • Mountain Creek has terrain and trails to suit all skill levels, from novice snow bunnies to experienced downhill dilettantes.
  • The resort’s fleet of over 1,000 snow cannons keeps its four peaks covered in fresh powder all season long.
  • Freestyle fans will love Mountain Creek’s snow parks, epic experiences with a variety of fun features suitable for all skill levels
  • The resort’s snow sports school is the perfect place for beginners to get acquainted with the slopes and a great way for more experienced skiers and snowboarders to take it to the next level. Get ready to hit the slopes with their Go Skiing and Go Snowboarding Packages: Everything You Need to Get Started! Go plans for adults start at $ 139 / person


RELATED: You Don’t Have to Travel Far from Denver to Find a Good Ski Resort

Keep busy with world class activities

Mountain Creek is more than a premier ski and snowboard destination; its variety of recreational opportunities makes it the ideal location for visitors who don’t want to spend all their time on the slopes.

  • Sno-Go is the last adventure in Mountain Creek; a sort of “snow bike” perfect for hurtling down snow-covered hills in all conditions, this fun new activity offers visitors full access to the mountain on the resort’s four peaks. Sno-Go Rental Package (includes rental of bikes, helmet, snowboard boots and instructions, $ 59.99 and up / person
  • Believe it or not, indoor skiing and snowboarding are possible. A fun day trip from Mountain Creek, BIG SNOW American Dream has the best indoor trails in their snow dome located near Rutherford, NJ
  • Snowtubing is one of the most fun outdoor winter activities out there, and the best part is that it doesn’t require any equipment or private lessons. Mountain Creek’s Magic Carpet Lift takes visitors to the top – no climbing is necessary, just enjoy the ride! Snowtubing $ 30 / person for a 2-hour session, advance ticket purchase required


  • The fun doesn’t end at the end of winter – head back to Mountain Creek when the weather warms up to try their Zip Tours, the epic Mountain Coaster, Mountain Creek Water Park, and super cool mountain bike trails

RELATED: These Ski Resorts Get The Most Snow, Which Means A Wild Adventure For Skiers

Dine, play and stay at Mountain Creek

Mountain Creek offers a variety of on-site accommodations and amenities that make it the perfect all-in-one winter vacation destination.

  • The Appalachian provides visitors with ski-in / ski-out accommodations that are comfortable, stylish and practical. Choose from studio, one and two bedroom units with stunning views and upscale amenities. There’s also a heated outdoor pool and hot tub, a family game room, and a fitness center. Rooms start at $ 169.15 / night (fall promotional offer)
  • You don’t have to leave Mountain Creek to find a great meal – their many on-site restaurants and bars offer everything from fun, casual fare (Schuss, Kink, and The Biergarten) to more elegant dining experiences (The Hawks Nest).


  • Jack & Otto’s is a great place for a drink after a long day on the slopes. Ski-themed and with an ultra-relaxing vibe, this laid-back spot also serves delicious casual fare and snacks.
  • Unwind and unwind with a trip to one of Mountain Creek’s multiple hot tubs, or sit back and stargazing (and roasting marshmallows!) In the resort’s new foyer.

One of the best ways to enjoy the winter season is to hit the slopes, but not everyone enjoys skiing and snowboarding, and that’s what makes destinations like New Jersey’s Mountain Creek Resort so special. With a plethora of fun and family-friendly activities, perfect for all ages and skill levels, Mountain Creek has everything visitors need for an epic winter getaway, including on-site accommodations, activities and trails. equipment that will make everyone want to bundle up and head outside.


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