Surfing – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 15:06:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://walkonmountain.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/favicon-5-120x120.png Surfing – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ 32 32 Wisniewski: miles from couch surfing | Opinion https://walkonmountain.com/wisniewski-miles-from-couch-surfing-opinion/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/wisniewski-miles-from-couch-surfing-opinion/ When I first started using Airbnb, the platform wasn’t that far from its founding (2008) or its original intention, which was to connect couch surfers and budget-conscious travelers with unusual stays. while putting a few dollars in the pockets of extroverted owners. In the early days of Airbnb, there were regular short-term rentals of couches, […]]]>






When I first started using Airbnb, the platform wasn’t that far from its founding (2008) or its original intention, which was to connect couch surfers and budget-conscious travelers with unusual stays. while putting a few dollars in the pockets of extroverted owners.

In the early days of Airbnb, there were regular short-term rentals of couches, tents, air mattresses, and guesthouses, as well as yurts, cabins, and teepees tucked away on farms and ranches. The accommodations were often rustic and affordable. Part of the appeal was that the community review process helped weed out bad guests and bad hosts, which was essential as most Airbnb stays were shared spaces. The expectation was for the hosts to greet guests in their homes and towns, sharing insider tips on where to go and what to do. What the platform of hotel-style amenities lacked, it made up for in authenticity and unique experiences.

In my opinion, Airbnb was not meant to be a hotel replacement or competitor. Airbnb was marketed to a different kind of traveler. The tech company was apparently trying to create a community of backpackers and quasi-bohemian travelers less concerned with material luxury and more concerned with “knowing” their destinations. The real Paris. The real New York. The real Colorado.

Those days are long gone. Various analysts have found that the majority of Airbnb listings are now for entire homes, rather than shared properties or a spare bedroom in owner-occupied accommodation.

Chances are, if you rent an apartment or house on Airbnb, you will never even see the owner / host. Airbnb hasn’t ushered in a new sharing economy. He trivialized another basic human need: shelter.

The awesome little tech startup is now a $ 75 billion giant (according to a Forbes article) that digs into communities rather than building them. Make no mistake, the company is always talking about a community game, but they never really came up with a convincing explanation for the benefit a community sees in taking homes out of the long-term rental pool and at the same time. converting what could have been main residences into miniature hotels which often do not pay taxes at the same level as those paid by hotels. What improvement in the community results from the fact that neighboring houses welcome a new group of tourists every week? And what about the offseason for cities and mountain resorts? Does a city of (even more) empty houses seem like a real community to anyone?

The original idea was that cash-strapped owners could scoop up a few dollars here and there, but sharks smelled like money a long time ago. Increasingly, multi-unit hosts are driving the growth of short-term rentals. It’s a big deal. And if there’s one thing big companies love, it’s expansion. If a handful of rentals are regularly booked and generate big revenues, then why wouldn’t a profitable Airbnb host look for other opportunities to expand their real estate empires?

Potential buyers – individuals, companies and investment funds – no longer look at homes the same way. The game has changed. The recalculations determine the value of a home not by its livability, architecture or nearby schools – the recalculations determine the value of a home by its potential income as a short-term rental.

Make no mistake: it’s a game, and the stake is life or death for mountain towns. The West is quickly becoming a graveyard of mountain towns carved out, unmarked and turned into places for tourists to hike and snap Instagram photos.

Difficult conversations await us. Is a boon for some worth the destruction of a city for all?

Much more can be said about Airbnb and its ilk. But in the meantime, consider this: The sharks swimming in the city want nothing more than to convince the nearby minnows that they too can be sharks like them.

But sharks eat other sharks.

Jay Wisniewski can be contacted by email at jay@aspendailynews.com


Source link

]]>
Bindi Irwin & Chandler Powell Take Baby Girl Grace Warrior Surf https://walkonmountain.com/bindi-irwin-chandler-powell-take-baby-girl-grace-warrior-surf/ Sun, 07 Nov 2021 23:23:40 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/bindi-irwin-chandler-powell-take-baby-girl-grace-warrior-surf/ Baby’s first waves! Bindi Irwin and Chandler Powell take their gorgeous daughter Grace Warrior to the beach on a family trip to Tasmania By Jade Watkins For Daily Mail Australia Posted: 23:23 GMT, November 7, 2021 | Update: 04:22 GMT, November 8, 2021 She is already following in her parents’ footsteps and has a keen […]]]>

Baby’s first waves! Bindi Irwin and Chandler Powell take their gorgeous daughter Grace Warrior to the beach on a family trip to Tasmania










She is already following in her parents’ footsteps and has a keen interest in wildlife.

But Bindi Irwin and Chandler Powell’s adorable baby girl Grace Warrior also enjoyed a trip to the beach this weekend on a family getaway to Tasmania.

Former wakeboarder Chandler melted hearts when he shared a photo of himself cuddling his daughter while hugging a surfboard.

Baby’s first waves! Bindi Irwin and Chandler Powell took their gorgeous daughter Grace Warrior to the beach in Tasmania this weekend

“I loved our day at the beach together ️” he captioned the post.

Little Grace looked cute as a button in the picture in a white jumpsuit with “Catchin” waves with daddy emblazoned on the front and a matching khaki hat with her dad.

The photo was probably taken by Bindi, who captured her baby girl laughing with joy.

Bindi also posted a photo of the couple’s sweet mother and daughter moment strolling along the shore.

Beach baby: Bindi posted a photo of a sweet mother and daughter moment as they strolled along the shore

Beach baby: Bindi posted a photo of a sweet mother and daughter moment as they strolled along the shore

Bindi wore rolled up jeans and a t-shirt, while she dressed Grace in a sun-kissed swimsuit and a large, wide-brimmed hat.

“Our little sunshine loved the day at the beach,” she captioned the post.

Family time: The Irwin clan took a getaway to Tasmania, sharing footage from their vacation on Instagram on Friday.  Chandler Powell, Bindi Irwin and baby Grace pictured

Family time: The Irwin clan took a getaway to Tasmania, sharing footage from their vacation on Instagram on Friday. Chandler Powell, Bindi Irwin and baby Grace pictured

It comes after a series of photos from the Irwin family’s getaway were shared on Instagram on Friday.

Robert Irwin, 17, and his mother Terri Irwin, 57, joined the young clan as they took in the sights of Cradle Mountain.

Bindi and Chandler brought their friends Luke and Mitch.

Bindi wrote in his caption:

Bindi wrote in her caption: ‘I am extremely grateful that I was able to share the rugged beauty of Tasmania with Grace. She had the best time hiking with us and exploring Cradle Mountain National Park’

In the photos, the family posed with great views in the background, including a vast mountain range.

They also took happy selfies by a lake, as well as on wooden walkways along the route.

The new mom was delighted to share her little girl’s first mountain hike.

Pals: Bindi and Chandler brought their friends Luke and Mitch, and all posed by a lake

Pals: Bindi and Chandler brought their friends Luke and Mitch, and all posed by a lake

Bindi wrote in her caption: “I am extremely grateful that I was able to share the rugged beauty of Tasmania with Grace.

“She had the best time hiking with us and exploring Cradle Mountain National Park.”

The Wildlife Warrior added: “Thank you @cradlemountainlodge for making our stay even more special.”

Moments: Grandma Terri bonded with little Grace during the hike

Moments: Grandma Terri bonded with little Grace during the hike

Bindi and Chandler welcomed their daughter on March 25, which coincidentally was their first wedding anniversary.

Grace Warrior’s middle name is a tribute to her late grandfather Steve Irwin, who coined the term “Wildlife Warrior” to promote wildlife conservation.

The couple announced that they were expecting their first child together in August of last year.

All smiles!  The family stayed at the quaint Cradle <a class=Mountain Lodge” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

All smiles! The family stayed at the quaint Cradle Mountain Lodge


Source link

]]>
Youth with Special Needs Catch Waves at Malibu Surf Showcase | Sports https://walkonmountain.com/youth-with-special-needs-catch-waves-at-malibu-surf-showcase-sports/ Fri, 05 Nov 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/youth-with-special-needs-catch-waves-at-malibu-surf-showcase-sports/ When Cara Armstrong of Simi Valley watches her 10-year-old daughter Mia surf, she is in awe of her. Mia, who has Down syndrome, calls herself a daredevil and lives up to the label with her surfing exploits. Mia was able to stand on a surfboard unaided during the summer and becomes whote the experienced water […]]]>

When Cara Armstrong of Simi Valley watches her 10-year-old daughter Mia surf, she is in awe of her. Mia, who has Down syndrome, calls herself a daredevil and lives up to the label with her surfing exploits. Mia was able to stand on a surfboard unaided during the summer and becomes whote the experienced water child.






Pictured, left to right: Mia, Dale Rhodes, Steven Lippman and Grace




“She loves the water and is very comfortable in the water,” said Cara, who envisions Mia going for a walk in the ocean to catch a wave with her older brother Jack. “As a parent of a child with special needs, when you learn of their diagnosis you are made aware of any limitations they might have, so every step your child takes is something we are excited about and that we celebrate. When you see your child participating in something like surfing in the hope that they can surf independently, it gives a lot of hope and strength for the trip.

Mia, who has been tandem surfing for over a year, and her mother’s dream of surfing took off at the end of last month at Surfrider Beach in Malibu. Mia shared a board with Dale Rhodes, a former professional surfer. The duo surfed for almost an hour. In addition to surfing the waves, Rhodes and Mia kept an eye out for marine life and chatted about science and gymnastics.

“It was like surfing with a very intelligent adult,” Rhodes from Mia. “She’s passed her years of intelligence.”

The two luckily caught between five and ten waves, Mia’s mother said.

“It was fantastic,” said Cara. “Mia had a blast.”

And she wasn’t the only one.

Mia was one of 50 young people with special needs, ages eight to 20, who participated in the A Walk on Water (AWOW) surf therapy event at Surfrider Beach on October 23. The wave show featured the kids, most of whom have neurological disabilities, receiving surf instruction from AWOW surf therapists, a group of experienced watermen, and then surfing the waves with the ocean surf therapists at the beach. for about an hour. Once the younger surfers returned to the sand, they were greeted with high fives and smiles.

The children then received surfing prizes from AWOW officials, surrounded by friends and family who cheered them on. There were lots of smiles for everyone.

Rhodes, one of AWOW’s 48 surf therapists, called the event a huge success.

“It’s quite overwhelming,” he said. “We want to give these kids self-confidence and teach them something about the ocean and surfing. We harness the transformative powers of the ocean.

Rhodes said everyone was in a good mood.

“It’s hard not to be festive when you see a child with special needs catch a wave at First Point Malibu and ride the wave all the way,” he said. “It’s electrifying. It touches us all and makes us aware of what is really important in life. “

The kids took to the ocean with instructors in groups of three, but their activities weren’t limited to surfing the waves. Children and their families built sandcastles, munched on meals donated by Vintage Grocers and had the opportunity to use other services provided by event sponsors including Paul Mitchell, Michael Schwab, Lululemon Athletica , Katin USA and Coral Mountain Wave Resort.

AWOW was founded in 2012 by a group including Malibuite Steven Lippman with the goal of helping children with unique needs and their families through surf therapy. The nonprofit organization’s website describes surf therapy as “uniquely based on the concept of including the whole family in connection with the healing powers of the ocean and our natural world.” By creating positive, uplifting, and empowering experiences, we rewrite expectations of what “therapy” can be.

AWOW wants children to gain confidence while surfing.

“We equip our participants to challenge expectations, rewrite their futures and come out of the ocean with one conviction: we are all ATHLETES,” the website read.

Although surf therapy is not a substitute for medical care, over the past decade many studies have highlighted the benefits of surfing. An article published in 2017 by California State University said that a half-hour surf session improved mood. A 2019 International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health article stated that over therapy may help soothe mental health issues.

Surf therapy enthusiast Cara said the activity had positive mental and physical impacts on Mia.

“It improved his motor skills and his core strength,” said Cara. “It also gave her something to participate that she can share with her ‘typical’ friends. She can talk about her experience. It was great for his socio-emotional well-being. She loves to get in the water.

The one-day event in Malibu, Rhodes said, gave families of young people time to relax.

“They can just let loose and watch their kids surf,” he said.

Cara said families of children with special needs have a lot of demands on them.

“Being able to share the joy of our children’s accomplishments – standing on the beach with other parents without having to explain the shoes you walk in because they walk with you – is a great sense of community,” a- she declared. “I really enjoyed being able to take a minute to have a burrito breakfast and sit on the beach and watch my daughter accomplish something amazing in the company of other members of the community.”

In addition, 10 young members of the Northern LA Boardriders, a surf club in Malibu, organized a one-hour competition on the beach that raised $ 15,000 for AWOW.

AWOW holds several surf therapy meetings each year on the east and west coasts. The Malibu Surf Therapy session is considered the organization’s West Coast “Super Bowl” every year. AWOW had no events in 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic, but had four other events leading up to the Malibu session this year. The last surf therapy gathering of the year will take place in Ventura this Saturday, November 6th.


Source link

]]>
Surf and rugby duo Caithness among Highland athletes to benefit from travel program https://walkonmountain.com/surf-and-rugby-duo-caithness-among-highland-athletes-to-benefit-from-travel-program/ Mon, 01 Nov 2021 12:15:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/surf-and-rugby-duo-caithness-among-highland-athletes-to-benefit-from-travel-program/ Scottish surfing champion Mark Boyd says it is great to receive support from the SportScotland travel program. Photo: James Gunn Three top athletic aces from Caithness are part of a group of 14 in the Highlands who have received grants from SportScotland’s Athlete Travel Awards program. The funding will help surf duo Mark Boyd and […]]]>

Scottish surfing champion Mark Boyd says it is great to receive support from the SportScotland travel program. Photo: James Gunn

Three top athletic aces from Caithness are part of a group of 14 in the Highlands who have received grants from SportScotland’s Athlete Travel Awards program.

The funding will help surf duo Mark Boyd and Craig McLachlan and rugby player Shannon Pasotti excel in the sports of their choice, along with 11 others from across the region, including runners, golfers and mountain bikers.

Details of the program – which promotes equal opportunities to participate, advance and succeed nationally and internationally – were announced by Scottish Sports Minister Maree Todd.

Ms Todd, who is the MSP of Caithness, Sutherland and Ross, was visiting Dingwall Academy as part of Scottish Women and Girls in Sport Week and met one of the successful athletes, Stephen Mackay (29) , an endurance runner from Inverness.

“The Athlete Travel Rewards program helps athletes in rural, remote and island communities overcome some of the challenges they face, such as access to facilities and travel costs,” said Ms. Todd.

“I am delighted that for the first time Highland athletes are benefiting from the program and look forward to seeing more of these athletes in the future as they continue to excel in their sport of choice.

Graham Lindsay (SportScotland), Mags Duncan (High Life Highland) and Maree Todd (Minister of Sports) with endurance runner Stephen Mackay.
Graham Lindsay (SportScotland), Mags Duncan (High Life Highland) and Maree Todd (Minister of Sports) with endurance runner Stephen Mackay.

The Athlete Travel Award program is a partnership between SportScotland and the participating local authorities – the Orkney Islands, the Western Islands and the Shetland Islands as well as the Highlands.

It aims to help “elite course” athletes – athletes with the potential to compete at a high level – to have better access to competitive and training opportunities without having to relocate from their community.

Athletes can apply for amounts of up to £ 1,500 through an application process. They are required to prove that the grant will improve their performance and give them access to quality training and competition opportunities to support their development.

One of the local athletes to benefit from the awards program is the reigning Scottish surfing champion, Mark Boyd.

Scottish surf team captain Mark (34) said: “It’s great to have a little bit of support for the trips we take from SportScotland.

“It will make it easier to access events, although a lot has been canceled this year. I used all the money to take a few training trips.”

Mark will defend his title at the Scottish National Surfing Championships in Thurso from November 5-7 – the first since 2019.

He has been the reigning Scottish champion since 2018. “I feel great,” said Mark. “I’ve had a small injury the last few weeks which is unfortunate, but I’m confident and can’t wait to get back to competition.”

Another local surfer, Craig McLachlan, 16, also received funding which he spent to travel to a number of Scottish competitions this year as well as training events.

In October Craig was thrilled to win the Under-16 title at the Scottish Junior Nationals held in Sandend, Aberdeenshire, and the week before he had won the junior boys section at the Tynemouth Open Surf Contest.

During the season he competed in five Scottish junior competitions, winning the overall title in the men’s under-16 and under-18 sections.

After a successful season, the fifth year student at Thurso High School is now busy making sure he has enough surf ahead of this weekend’s championships in Thurso where he will make his debut in the men’s event – a big step forward for him.

He is also considering next year when he hopes to compete in the World Junior Surfing Championship in El Salvador.

Shannon Pasotti fights to score a try for Caithness Krakens against Orkney Dragons in the Caledonia North Region League.  Photo: James Gunn
Shannon Pasotti fights to score a try for Caithness Krakens against Orkney Dragons in the Caledonia North Region League. Photo: James Gunn

Shannon Pasotti, who turns 18 on Wednesday, said the athlete travel rewards program would make a big difference in helping her transition from junior rugby to senior rugby.

Shannon, who lives in Thurso, has performed in the Scottish Futures U18 Performance Development Program and has Scottish Women’s Assessment Camps coming up.

She played for Caithness Krakens in the Caledonia North Region League and also plays for Caithness U18s.

“Receiving this money will make a huge difference in my rugby development as it will allow me to participate in more competitive training sessions and matches, allowing me to move from junior rugby to senior rugby,” she said.

“It will also prepare me better for my women’s assessment camps in Scotland in the near future.”

Shannon is in her second year of studying sports and fitness at the University of the Highlands and Islands.

Highland athletes who have passed this round of applications are:

  • Stephen Mackay (athletics, Inverness-based)
  • Summer Elliot (golf, Inverness)
  • Sophie Barrie (badminton, Inverness)
  • Shannon Pasotti (rugby, Thurso)
  • Ollie Smith (rugby, Inverness)
  • Megan Keith (track and field and orienteering, Inverness)
  • Mark Boyd (surf, Thurso)
  • Lucas Cairns (athletics, Fortrose)
  • Jack Mann (golf, Avoch)
  • Douglas Goodwill (Downhill mountain biking, Beauly)
  • Daniel Parfitt (Downhill mountain biking, Fort William)
  • Craig McLachlan (surf, Thurso)
  • Alice Kemsley (orienteering, Nethy Bridge)
  • Alexander Mackay (athletics, Dingwall)
Inverness athlete Stephen Mackay with Scottish Sports Minister Maree Todd.
Inverness athlete Stephen Mackay with Scottish Sports Minister Maree Todd.

Stephen Mackay, who represented Scotland in the 3,000m and holds the Inverness Harriers 1,500m record, says the extra support will make a big difference to Highland athletes.

“Being in the north can be a bit of a disadvantage because you have that extra cost right away just to travel the route that you might not have if you are based in the central belt,” Stephen said. “So this funding makes it easier to access the competitions and the training camp level that we need as full-time athletes.

“As an endurance runner you have to spend a few months at altitude.

“I’m hoping to reach the Commonwealth Games standard for the 800m or 1500m and to do that, I’m going to have to compete in bigger competitions across Europe. There will also be opportunities in the UK but to be honest living in Inverness it doesn’t matter UK or Europe you have to travel anyway.

“It can be expensive, so sometimes it’s just as cheap to go to Europe and have a better quality race. This funding is crucial to enable me to do that because it allows me to avoid some of the hassle. and costs. “

As part of the support program, High Life Highland gave athletes supported by the program free access to all of its facilities in the region.

Stephen, who also trains with Olympians Laura Muir and Jemma Reekie in Glasgow, added: “I use the track but also the new gymnasium in Inverness. They have a strength and conditioning suite that is really good – to be honest, this is one of the best I’ve ever used.

“This is where I train normally, but with High Life Highland you can now train anywhere in the Highlands for free, so if you are away for the weekend you can go to no any sports center.

“I also have Inverness Royal Academy next to me so I use it too and just having that flexibility is so handy.”

SportScotland Managing Director Stewart Harris said: “At SportScotland, we recognize the specific challenges facing Highland athletes. That’s why we’re excited to provide this investment through the Athlete Rewards Program, in partnership with High Life Highland.

“By working together, we can provide services locally through the SportScotland Institute of Sport and High Life Highland, while also providing additional support to enable talented athletes to get to competitions and advance in the sport of their choice.

“It’s fantastic to see these first Highland athletes who stand to benefit from the program, and we can’t wait to see how their athletic careers progress.”

SportScotland allocated £ 10,000 to each of the four local authorities in the Highlands and Islands, with the recreation boards or trusts then being required to supplement this with £ 2,000 of their own funding, plus the equivalent of £ 3,000 of time management and administration.

Mags Duncan, Sports Development Manager for High Life Highland, said: “We are delighted to be working in partnership with SportScotland to provide this additional funding to support the talented athletes of Highland. The funding will help them access specialized training and competitions that will benefit their development.

Up to 32 athletes from the four local authorities in the Highlands and Islands will be supported in 2021/22. Now in its third year of funding, the program has already supported 48 athletes across island authorities.


Do you want to respond to this article? If yes, click here submit your thoughts and they can be published in print.


Source link

]]>
Dreaming about Japan: From Shikoku Surf to Mount Fuji Sunsets https://walkonmountain.com/dreaming-about-japan-from-shikoku-surf-to-mount-fuji-sunsets/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 21:28:32 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/dreaming-about-japan-from-shikoku-surf-to-mount-fuji-sunsets/ While international travel remains irrelevant, all we can do is dream of adventures abroad. Simon Day wanted to visit Japan. For 18 months, I hadn’t missed traveling. My twin sons were born on Boxing Day 2019 and for a year and a half I had been buried in the joy and pain of becoming a […]]]>

While international travel remains irrelevant, all we can do is dream of adventures abroad. Simon Day wanted to visit Japan.

For 18 months, I hadn’t missed traveling. My twin sons were born on Boxing Day 2019 and for a year and a half I had been buried in the joy and pain of becoming a new parent. I had had the privilege of spending much of my 20s living and traveling abroad, and since returning to Aotearoa I had constantly planned my next adventure to sample the landscapes, flavors and experiences of the world. But now my priorities had changed. The Covid-19 restrictions didn’t seem relevant to my bubble. I couldn’t see past my little boys.

Then one day I went to my favorite ramen restaurant. Greeted in a harmonious choir by the staff – “Irrasshaimase! – I was immediately taken back to Japan. The steaming bowl of noodles and an Orion beer in a frosted glass made me want to walk the noren of a izakaya in a Tokyo alley.

I have visited Japan twice. I remember when I first arrived feeling like I had been transported to another planet. The bright neon lights and the vividness of everything had flooded my senses. Now a plate of edamame and a bowl of broth and noodles suddenly made me want to jump on a flight and relive it all.

When all I could do was dream of taking my passport for a flight to Narita International Airport, I suddenly started to see Japan everywhere. On a flight to Wellington, as I looked out the starboard window on the west coast, Taranaki’s symmetrical cone reminded me of Mount Fuji. As I wandered through the bars and restaurants in the alleys of our capital, I remembered my first night in Osaka, lost in the alleys of Shinsekai. Queenstown’s Instagram posts featuring that city’s somewhat infamous onsen made me wait a long time to return to Hokkaido.

There is inspiration everywhere you look, with New Zealand’s natural beauty sharing many similarities with Japan. So while we are still trapped within the confines of our borders, we’ve rounded up some of the best and in many ways familiar places of Japan to inspire you on the day we return to international travel.

Illustrations: Ross Murray

Mount Fuji

The first time I saw Mount Fuji, I was fascinated. Speeding between Tokyo and Osaka on the shinkansen, its perfect snow-capped cone gradually appeared through the window as if it was growing before my eyes. It’s easy to see why the mountain, rising 3,776 meters from Fuji-Hakone-Izu National Park, has become a spiritual and artistic muse.

The sunrise from the top of Mount Fuji is so special that it bears its own name – goraiko (御 来 光, literally “arrival of the light”). The elevation allows for a view like no other, as the sun rises from the early morning sea of ​​clouds that envelops the island.

The official climbing season on Mount Fuji runs from early July to mid-September, with the round trip taking between eight and 12 hours, depending on the trail taken. Many hikers choose to hike through the night to catch the goraiko at the top – for those climbers, or for anyone who needs it, the mountain huts dotted along the various routes provide hikers with a place to rest and hike. full.

The next time you hike the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, dream of climbing Mount Fuji.

Illustrations: Ross Murray

Caving in Okinoerabujima

The isolated coral island of Okinoerabujima is part of the Amami Island Group and lies between Kyushu and Okinawa. Accessible by ferry or plane, the island is famous for its 300 limestone caves.

The Shoryudo Cave is the largest and can be explored without specialized equipment. The 3.5-kilometer cave – with its first 600 meters open to the public – is filled with ancient stalactites and stalagmites carved over millennia, and its emerald pools glow under visitors’ headlamps. For the more seasoned explorer, there are also more advanced options on the island. It’s like a luxurious version of the Waitomo Caves.

Once you’re done caving, consider heading to Cape Tamina, located in the northwest of the island. Admire the limestone walls of the 52m high cliff as the crashing waves showcase the eroding beauty of nature – don’t forget to keep an eye on your foot to prevent any slipping, it is a long way down.

Skiing in Hokkaido

The train that connects Sapporo to Niseko Ski Resort is very different from the high-speed trains that catapult you between the main centers. It is tiny and slowly traverses the thick snow of the northernmost island, first along the coast, then through the forest and into the mountains.

The snow in Niseko was unlike any other I had known. After a night of heavy snowfall, the city was covered with white columns. The powder is thick and fluffy, the flakes are visible when they fall in the sky. Skiing on these terrains is like floating on a cloud.

But the best thing about skiing in Hokkaido is relaxing in the geothermal hot pools of a traditional onsen, many of which are located outdoors in stunning natural surroundings. The sources are rich in minerals and have many benefits for your skin health and muscle recovery.

But onsen are more than just ski rehab, they’re an important part of the Japanese way of life, and a unique label means they’re a cultural immersion too. Leave your inhibitions in the locker room as you will swim (in gender-specific pools) naked.

Illustrations: Ross Murray

Surfing in Shikoku

Four years ago I bought a surfboard and a wetsuit. Embarrassingly, I wore the suit once (accidentally put it inside out) and never took the board out of its bag. Watching surfing at the Tokyo Olympics – the first time the sport was included in the games – made me want to unpack the board for the very first time.

The smallest of Japan’s four main islands, Shikoku is a microcosm of the country’s natural beauty. With its mountains, rivers, beaches and ocean, Shikoku provides access to everything a more adventurous traveler is looking for. It is also considered to be one of the best places in Japan for surfing.

The south coast of the island, in the prefectures of Kochi and Tokushima, is where you will find the best waves, with a number of beaches and point breaks. But the most famous surf of Shikoku is its river mouth and during typhoon season surfers come from all over the world for these waves. If the swell is calm, get your adrenaline pumping on a canyoning in Nametoko Gorge or ziplining through the Iya Valley.

Maybe next time I visit Japan I will take my wetsuit and surfboard. I can only dare to dream.



Source link

]]>
California oil spill: surfing, swimming OK but fishing https://walkonmountain.com/california-oil-spill-surfing-swimming-ok-but-fishing/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 14:27:05 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/california-oil-spill-surfing-swimming-ok-but-fishing/ Scott Breneman, owner of West Caught Fish, slices fish for a customer at a market in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, October 27, 2021. Breneman said he fished 90 miles (145 kilometers) off the coast of Orange County, well beyond an area closed to fishing by the state following a crude pipeline spill. Despite this, he […]]]>



Scott Breneman, owner of West Caught Fish, slices fish for a customer at a market in Newport Beach, Calif., Wednesday, October 27, 2021. Breneman said he fished 90 miles (145 kilometers) off the coast of Orange County, well beyond an area closed to fishing by the state following a crude pipeline spill. Despite this, he said business had fallen due to consumer concerns about the impact of the spill on local fish. Breneman said he hopes that when the state completes its safety studies and reopens fishing along the coast, business will rebound. (AP Photo / Amy Taxin)

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. (AP) – Four weeks after an oil spill washed drops of crude off the Southern California coast, surfers have returned to the waves and people are playing in the waves.

But fishermen still cannot drop lines in the same waters.

California has banned fishing in an area stretching about 9.7 to 12 miles off the coast of Orange County since an undersea pipeline spilled at least about 25,000 gallons ( 94,635 liters) of crude oil in the Pacific Ocean.

State environmental health experts are conducting studies to determine if shellfish and fish are safe for human consumption – a process that is expected to take weeks or more.

Scott Breneman, owner of West Caught Fish, said he still fished for tuna and black cod well beyond the no-go zone. He said he was able to continue selling his catch to restaurants, but customers were not buying as they usually do at a popular Newport Beach fish market due to concerns about the fishing ban from the ‘State.

“People assume the local fish are contaminated, and we are fishing about 90 miles from the beach here, a long way away,” Breneman said, adding that he was going fishing about half as much as usual. “I don’t want to take the resource when I can’t sell it.”

As life along the coast returns to normal, commercial fishermen and charter operators have been particularly affected by the closures. Some have joined the lawsuits against the owner of Houston’s Amplify Energy pipeline and say their biggest fear is that the stigma of the spill will keep tourists away even after the oily tar that washed up on beaches is long gone.

Eric Zelien, owner of EZ Sportfishing in Huntington Beach, said guests have canceled fishing trips even though there are many areas where fishing is permitted. Instead of taking daily trips, he now takes groups once or twice a week.

“Most of our residents are rescheduling their trips. It’s kind of like when COVID first hit, ”he said.

“When you hear an oil spill, everyone thinks of Exxon Valdez,” Zelien said, referring to the tanker that ran aground in 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska and spilled millions of gallons. “They are panicking because the whole ocean is covered in oil and everything is in a state of disrepair.”

Conservationists initially feared the worst when they learned of the spill on October 2. The initial estimate was that the spill could have been five times larger than the amount later announced by authorities. The Coast Guard said much of the kilometer-long oil plume appeared to shatter at sea, limiting the impact on sensitive wetlands and wildlife along the coast.

The beaches of Huntington Beach, known as “Surf City USA”, were closed to swimming and surfing for a week. But surfers there and near Newport Beach quickly got back on the waves after workers cleaned up the sand and local officials tested the water, deeming it safe to get in.

But authorities say eating fish in the water is not the same as swimming in it. Fish in oil spill areas can ingest petroleum, which contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that can cause cancer if consumed in certain amounts, said Susan Klasing, chief of the fish, ecotoxicology and water section in the office. Californian Environmental Health Risk Assessment.

She said the oil breaks down over time, so there’s no doubt the fishing will resume, it’s just a matter of when.

State officials collect samples of seashells along the shore and fish off the coast and send them to a laboratory for analysis. Once the tests are complete, state officials will assess whether the closure of the fishing grounds can be lifted, she said.

This process took about six weeks after a 2015 oil spill in Santa Barbara County, northwest of Los Angeles.

The spill off the coast of Orange County was caused by a leak in the pipeline that was carrying crude oil from three offshore platforms. The cause is under investigation, but federal officials said the pipeline was likely initially damaged by a ship’s anchor.

The closure of the fisheries has not only upset those who make a living this way. It has become a recreational activity for many who live near water. Signs are posted on area beaches warning that fishing is prohibited, though a handful of people still drop lines at local piers.

Ted Reckas of Laguna Beach said he was back to swimming and surfing at the beach, but since the spill lobster diving has been suspended, which he usually does when the season opens in October.

“All of this upsets me, not just lobster fishing,” said Reckas, who for years walked from his house to the beach to dive and bring back his catch for friends and family.

He added: “Obviously it was disappointing, but there is a whole ecosystem of marine life that is affected by this. How many oil spills do we need to have before we find a better way? ”


Source link

]]>
the fearless pioneer of big wave surfing https://walkonmountain.com/the-fearless-pioneer-of-big-wave-surfing/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 18:08:35 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/the-fearless-pioneer-of-big-wave-surfing/ Greg Noll was one of the big wave surf pioneers and possibly the first surfer to ride Waimea Bay on the north shore of Oahu, Hawaii. Greg Lawhead was born on February 11, 1937 in San Diego, California. He moved to Manhattan Beach with his mother, Grace Zalabak, who had just divorced her father, Robert, […]]]>

Greg Noll was one of the big wave surf pioneers and possibly the first surfer to ride Waimea Bay on the north shore of Oahu, Hawaii.

Greg Lawhead was born on February 11, 1937 in San Diego, California.

He moved to Manhattan Beach with his mother, Grace Zalabak, who had just divorced her father, Robert, and married a chemical engineer named Ash Noll.

Greg, who took his stepfather’s last name, started surfing at the age of 11 and by the time he reached his teens he was already one of the best hot dogs in Los Angeles.

The regular footed surfer made his first trip to Hawaii in 1954. Noll was 17 and was eager to put his surfing skills to the test.

For seven months, he stayed in a Quonset hut on the west side of Oahu, near the infamous Waimea Bay, and completed his senior year at Waipahu High School.

The physically strong, broad-shouldered American began to develop an obsession with big waves. He was 6’2 ” (1.88 meters) tall and weighed around 230 pounds (104 kilograms).

So, on subsequent trips to Hawaii, Noll began to step up his game by taking on bigger waves at Sunset Beach and Laniakea.

The 19-year-old Noll traveled to Australia as a member of the US Lifeguard Team at the 1956 Melbourne Olympics.

He and his team immediately hit the surf with their Malibu Chip balsa surfboards, leaving a lasting imprint and legacy in the local surf community.

Break “The Waimea Taboo”

A few months later, Noll will experience the most iconic event of his career – a historic blow that will immortalize him.

The year was 1957.

Dickie Cross was killed after paddling two and a half miles from Sunset Beach to Waimea Bay.

He and his friend Woody Brown were desperately trying to reach shore after being caught by a powerful swell and continuous breaking waves.

The goal was to get us to the deep water channel of Waimea Bay. Sadly, only Brown barely survived.

And so, “The Waimea Taboo” kept surfers away for 14 years.

On November 7, 1957, Greg Noll and Mike Stange were ready to challenge the haunted wave. The surf at the back was around 15 feet.

According to subsequent reports, the duo weren’t the first to break Dickie Cross’s spell.

“It later emerged that a mild-mannered Seal Beach lifeguard named Harry Schurch had, in fact, caught a few waves that same morning in Waimea, surfing alone, before Noll and his gang showed up,” Matt notes. Warshaw, author of “The Encyclopedia of Surfing.”

But, symbolically, Noll and Stange had opened a new chapter in big wave surfing history, and the world just couldn’t be enough.

Greg Noll: a master surfboard shaper and legendary big wave pioneer |  Photo: Noll Archives

“Da Bull”: the birth of a legend

Meanwhile, the Californian surfer has stayed close to the surf industry.

He had founded Greg Noll Surfboards and launched a series of publications: “Surfers Annual” (1960), “Surfing Funnies” (1961), and “The Cartoon History of Surfing” (1962).

In 1965, the surfer-businessman opened a 20,000 square foot surfboard factory in Hermosa.

In less than a year, the extravagant investment enabled it to produce more than 2,000 boards per week.

The factory had separate rooms for each stage of manufacturing the surfboards.

One of the famous boards coming off its assembly line was Mickey Dora’s signature model, which featured “Da Cat” hanging from a cross made up of two boards.

Despite his successful business ventures, Noll has never stopped surfing and pushing the limits of wave surfing.

Greg’s most iconic nickname is “Da Bull”.

The nickname was given by Phil edwards, the first surfer to prove that it was possible to tame the crashing waves of the Pipeline.

Dressed in his legendary black and white striped prison boardshort, the man who challenged Waimea Bay was ready – and hungry – for more.

The bigmouthed legend starred in several films from the 1950s and 1960s, including “Surf Crazy” (1959), “Gun Ho!” (1963), “Strictly Hot” (1964) and “Golden Breed” (1968).

Greg Noll has also appeared in a few widely acclaimed and viewed films such as “Ride the Wild Surf” (1964) and The Quintessential “Endless summer“(1966).

“Da Bull” participated in the Duke Kahanamoku Invitational from 1965 to 1969.

And just when he thought his heyday was over, Noll fell into one of the biggest waves to ever ride in two decades.

On December 4, 1969, Greg plunged into a 35-foot wave in Makaha, Oahu, and was forced to jump when the mountain’s water wall exploded around him.

“It was like looking over the edge of the great black pit,” Noll wrote in his autobiography “Da Bull: Life Over the Edge”.

“Some of my best friends said it was a wave of death wishes. I didn’t think so at the time, but looking back, I realize that it was probably on the borderline.”

A few days later, he saved a sailor from drowning in Waimea Bay.

Greg Noll: Wearing his signature black and white striped prison swimsuit at Banzai Pipeline |  Photo: John Severson

One last return

Soon after, the “Babe Ruth of Surfing,” as she was often called, radically changed her life.

Noll moved to Alaska to live in an RV, then worked as a commercial fisherman in Crescent City, California for 15 years.

The adventurous larger than life character returned to the media spotlight in the 1980s as the legendary surfer who pioneered big wave surfing.

He has appeared in films and documentaries and returned to the surf industry circus with Da Bull clothing company, Greg Noll Oceanwear, and a new film, “Search for Surf” (1992).

Although he never quite retired from shaping surfboards, Noll began producing limited edition Da Cat surfboard models that he would sell to collectors for $ 10,000.

Between 1991 and 1996 he held a competition in Costa Rica for veteran surfers called the Da Bull Surf Legends Classic and found time to establish the East Coast Surfing Hall of Fame.

Noll was inducted into the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame in 1996 and received the Waterman of the Year 1998 award by the Surf Industry Manufacturers Association (SIMA).

The fearless surfing legend had four children with Laura Archuletta: Ashlyne, Jed, Tate and Rhyn.

Greg Noll died on June 28, 2021 in Crescent City, California.


Source link

]]>
October half-session: UK outdoor trips, from surfing to winter sports https://walkonmountain.com/october-half-session-uk-outdoor-trips-from-surfing-to-winter-sports/ Sat, 16 Oct 2021 06:38:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/october-half-session-uk-outdoor-trips-from-surfing-to-winter-sports/ Have fun in the great outdoors (Photo: Metro.co.uk) Mid-term is the perfect time to take children away from their screens and immerse them in the great outdoors. Except when it comes to outdoor attractions as exciting as these, there won’t be any drag. Turn this semester into a thrilling adventure with walks in the woods, […]]]>
Have fun in the great outdoors (Photo: Metro.co.uk)

Mid-term is the perfect time to take children away from their screens and immerse them in the great outdoors.

Except when it comes to outdoor attractions as exciting as these, there won’t be any drag.

Turn this semester into a thrilling adventure with walks in the woods, mountain top surf lessons and breathtaking biking trails.

Plus, we select some of the UK’s most exhilarating adventure playgrounds, and some of them even have special Halloween events.

There is even a magical walk in the Forbidden Forest for Harry Potter fans…

Chatsworth Explorer Walks

There is exploration to do

Make the most of the fresh air and the views of the woods on a series of fall hikes alongside the rangers of the Chatsworth Estate. Explore new trails through Stand Wood on a two-mile walk, suitable for ages five and up.

Or head to the barnyard to meet the animals and participate in spooky crafts throughout the mid-term, and dare to ride the Halloween trailer in Warlock Wood. Also look for seed collecting walks, with a seed collecting and potting session.

Various dates, Chatsworth Estate, Derbyshire, chatsworth.org

Go Ape Sunset Sessions

Perfect for little monkeys (Photo: Rachel Keenan)

The forest comes alive at dusk for the Sundown Sessions of the treetop attraction. This month, evening sessions begin in centers across the country.

Tackle the high platforms at sunset or tackle ziplines under a blanket of stars in the huge adventure playgrounds.

Daily, nationwide, goape.fr

The lost castle adventure playground

Play all day (Photo: Jonathan Becker)

In the grounds of the actual ruins of Lowther Castle, one of the country’s largest adventure playgrounds is perfect for letting off steam in the woods.

Built by the company Curious Adventure Play, the Lost Castle is an architectural echo of the main building itself, constructed from 18,000 meters of sustainable timber.

There are ramps and steps and a maze of turrets, zip lines, walkways and slides. Also discover the castle and the exhibition telling its story.

Daily, Penrith, Cumbria, lowthercastle.org

BeWILDerwood

Adventures in the woods (Photo: Andrew Kahumbu (Andrew Kahumbu)

After dark, there is a Glorious Glowing Lantern Parade at the sites of Cheshire and Norfolk in October, where you can make your own Boggle Bindle lantern to help light up the woods.

Or, during the day, the magical treehouses and huge wobbly wooden play towers are a great place for a woodland adventure.

BeWILDerwood is based on the magical book series from creator and author Tom Blofeld, featuring giant slippery slides, ziplines and huge, confusing mazes to lose yourself in. There are also storytelling shows, crafts, den building and forestry activities.

Daily, Cheshire and Norfolk, bewilderwood.co.uk

Snowdonia Adventure Park

Surfer in the mountains

Face the waves in October and learn to surf in the mountains. Constant, perfect waves of collected Welsh rainwater roll every 90 seconds over this specially designed site, designed to be the perfect environment for all ages and abilities to learn to surf safely.

Join the friendly surf academy – with sessions for Little Rippers (ages five to seven) and Groms (ages eight to 12). There is the rental of wetsuits and boards, and warm changing rooms to warm up afterwards.

Daily, Dolgarrog, North Wales, adventureparcsnowdonia.com

Snow school

Scottish Skiing (Photo: Steven McKenna)

Nearly 3,000 feet above sea level, in the beautiful Cairngorms to the east, the Lecht Activity Center is a natural playground. They offer a ski school from beginner to expert level, as well as snowboard and riglet snowboard lessons, suitable for the youngest.

There are also areas for beginners, intermediates and a black slope for advanced skiers, as well as mountain bike trails with dirt jumps and riding elements built from rock.

Daily, Strathdon, Aberdeenshire, lecht.fr

Harry Potter: An Adventure in the Forbidden Forest

A magical outing

Join the wizarding world on this new after dark forest trail populated by mythical creatures and spooky incantations from the Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts films.

Enjoy the spectacular sounds, lights and special effects that bring the magic of the forest to life. Look for centaurs, a hippogriff, and a patronus on this adventure, suitable for all ages.

From Tuesday, Arley Hall & Gardens, Cheshire, hpforbiddenforestexperience.com

Altura Trail

On your bike (Photo: Matty Simpson)

The longest specially designed mountain bike trail in the Lake District offers views of Derwentwater, Bassenthwaite, Helvellyn and Skiddaw and reaches an elevation of 500m above Keswick.

Designed for experienced riders with good off-road skills, the 12 mile trail is divided into north and south loops, traversing the Whinlatter Mountain Forest. Bike rental is available on site.

Daily, Whinlatter Mountain Forest, Keswick, forestry.uk

Kelburn Castle

Add color (Photo: Alamy Stock Photo)

Few castles look as striking as Kelburn, the home of the Earl of Glasgow, and it’s a brilliant day.

Covered in gorgeous Brazilian graffiti, the grounds are also a plethora of gameplay opportunities, including this weekend’s Freaky Forest alien hunt in the Secret Forest. There are also Halloween themed games to participate in. Disguises are encouraged.

Daily, Ayrshire, Scotland, kelburnestate.com

Do you have a story to share?

Contact us by sending an email to MetroLifestyleTeam@Metro.co.uk.

MORE: October Half-Session: Great Family Outings, From Peppa Pig To Science Adventures


How to get your Metro newspaper fix

Metro newspaper is always available for you to recover every morning of the week or you can download our app for all your favorite news, features, puzzles … and the exclusive evening edition!

Download the Metro newspaper app for free at App Store and google play


Source link

]]>
Tom Morey, iconic surfer and inventor of the Boogie Board, has died https://walkonmountain.com/tom-morey-iconic-surfer-and-inventor-of-the-boogie-board-has-died/ Fri, 15 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/tom-morey-iconic-surfer-and-inventor-of-the-boogie-board-has-died/ Tom Morey, in front of the first Boogie Board, 2017. Photo: Screenshot //eBodyboarding.com Tom Morey was not born near the ocean – it was actually Detroit – but during his lifetime he arguably would have had more influence in ocean sports than any other living person after his parents moved him to Laguna Beach as […]]]>

Tom Morey, in front of the first Boogie Board, 2017. Photo: Screenshot //eBodyboarding.com


Inertia

Tom Morey was not born near the ocean – it was actually Detroit – but during his lifetime he arguably would have had more influence in ocean sports than any other living person after his parents moved him to Laguna Beach as a child. Morey, the inventor of the Boogie Board, passed away this week at 86 in Laguna Woods, California. near his longtime San Clemente home. But his influence will live on for decades.

Morey first thought of the Boogie Board (which he named after his love of jazz) while living in Hawaii in the early 1970s. There was a big wave near where he lived. , he wanted to surf but didn’t think he could get in standing up because of the wind, which was common. So the math major who worked for Douglas Aircrafts before returning to the surf industry, cut a piece of foam in half, put on swim fins, and rowed. It worked like clockwork.

“The first thing that happens, I smell the ocean” Morey said in an older interview. “You can’t feel the outline of the ocean until you step on a Boogie Board. “

He sold his first in Hawaii for ten dollars before returning to Southern California to begin production of the all-new wave surfing tool, a tool that would eventually draw thousands of people into the waves, even people who would never get up on a board. and actually devote themselves completely to surfing while lying on your stomach.

The Boogie Board was far from the only invention Morey’s curious mind had conceived. He also thought of a sticky substance that could be vaporized in place of wax (which never really took off), and developed the first foam surfboards with Mike Doyle. But one of his most important contributions to surfing was the removable fin system.

Morey, according to inertia Sam George, introduced his WAVE (Water Apparatus Vehicular Engineering) system in 1967. Morey’s twin screw WAVE gearbox accommodated a wide variety of fins, including George Greenough’s revolutionary speed skeg and the system was soon used. by most major manufacturers.

Morey will be remembered as someone who greatly influenced the technical side of surfing. But most of all, he just loved riding the waves and wanted others to really like him too. “For anyone to become a graduate of this planet,” he once said, “it is essential that they learn to enjoy this activity.”

Rest in peace Tom Morey.



Source link

]]>
Body of NTNU Student Found After Disappearing While Surfing in Yilan, Taiwan | Taiwan News https://walkonmountain.com/body-of-ntnu-student-found-after-disappearing-while-surfing-in-yilan-taiwan-taiwan-news/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/body-of-ntnu-student-found-after-disappearing-while-surfing-in-yilan-taiwan-taiwan-news/ TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – The body of a National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU) student nicknamed Lin (林) washed up on Wednesday afternoon (October 6) after missing while surfing with his friends on a beach in Yilan County. Lin, 24, and four of his friends left Taipei early Wednesday morning for a surf trip to Honeymoon […]]]>

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – The body of a National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU) student nicknamed Lin (林) washed up on Wednesday afternoon (October 6) after missing while surfing with his friends on a beach in Yilan County.

Lin, 24, and four of his friends left Taipei early Wednesday morning for a surf trip to Honeymoon Bay in Toucheng Township of Yilan County, according to the report. They went into the water to surf at 6 a.m., and Lin’s friends arrived ashore at 6:30 a.m.

However, 20 minutes later, they found Lin was missing, according to the report. Friends of the NTNU student searched for him for about 30 minutes before reporting his disappearance and called for help from the authorities.

The Yilan County Fire Department received the missing person’s report at 7:02 a.m. and dispatched 20 firefighters, including four volunteers, to the scene. Meanwhile, the Coast Guard dispatched four officers to search for the missing surfer, according to CNA.

According to the report, two Coast Guard patrol boats, two rubber rafts from volunteer firefighters and a helicopter from the National Airborne Service Corps also joined in the search. However, at 1:21 p.m., search and rescue personnel found a body washed ashore, which was identified by members of the Lin family as their own, according to CNA.


Source link

]]>