Skiing – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 04:33:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://walkonmountain.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/favicon-5-120x120.png Skiing – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ 32 32 Skiing on a living volcano in northern Japan https://walkonmountain.com/skiing-on-a-living-volcano-in-northern-japan/ Wed, 18 May 2022 04:33:43 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/skiing-on-a-living-volcano-in-northern-japan/ “And you thought it was always deep powder in Japan,” jokes Hokkaido Powder Guides director Chuck Olbery as he climbs Mount Tokachi in what he describes as “boiler plate” conditions. And while the snow conditions in his edit don’t quite compare to the powder in some of his early-season videos, this one is particularly interesting […]]]>

“And you thought it was always deep powder in Japan,” jokes Hokkaido Powder Guides director Chuck Olbery as he climbs Mount Tokachi in what he describes as “boiler plate” conditions. And while the snow conditions in his edit don’t quite compare to the powder in some of his early-season videos, this one is particularly interesting for another reason: he’s climbing an active volcano.

“This is a volcanic tripwire that will alert someone sitting in an office in Sapporo if an avalanche has triggered and debris is coming down the mountain,” Olbery remarks at one point in the video.

And the tripwire is there for a reason. Mount Tokachi has erupted three times in the past 100 years, the most recent in 1988.

“As you go up on skins you realize how active the volcano is with the webcams that are pointed at the caldera, the seismic survey plots and also the tripwires at the top of the mountain,” reads the description on the video.

“They used to be a ski resort on the mountain, but it was disbanded the last eruption with damage. You talk to some locals and they remember skiing the mountain with a ski lift.

The 10-minute video also shows many of the features of an April day in Daisetsuzan National Park in Hokkaido, with bright blue skies and sweeping views of the Alps. The area is considered by many (including Hokkaido backcountry guides) to be the location of Japan’s best backcountry skiing, with some of Hokkaido’s tallest mountains and volcanoes, as well as the lightest, driest powder you can find on the planet.

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Stuck in the Rockies: Skiing the Colorado 13ers https://walkonmountain.com/stuck-in-the-rockies-skiing-the-colorado-13ers/ Sat, 14 May 2022 19:30:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/stuck-in-the-rockies-skiing-the-colorado-13ers/ At the top of Carbonate, ready to ski. (Christy Mahon) By the time May rolls around, many locals have hung up their skis and left town. Some head to the beach, others visit family or go on a trip to the desert. I don’t blame them. Winter is long and it can be nice to […]]]>

At the top of Carbonate, ready to ski. (Christy Mahon)

By the time May rolls around, many locals have hung up their skis and left town. Some head to the beach, others visit family or go on a trip to the desert. I don’t blame them. Winter is long and it can be nice to take off your ski boots.

But if you love cross-country skiing, now is the perfect time to explore our local Colorado mountains.

The late spring snowpack is more stable and the weather is generally warmer and more pleasant. More importantly, access to trailheads and remote valleys improves as closed roads melt or are cleared of snow.



However, it can sometimes be difficult to come up with new ideas. If you’ve been exploring your garden for a while, you might not feel too inspired to repeat the goals you’ve already achieved. In that case, look beyond the mountains in your immediate backyard and consider exploring other peaks around the state.

It is common knowledge that our state has more than fifty 14,000 foot peaks. Fifty-three, to be exact, according to the Colorado Mountain Club. They can make great skiing goals, and consulting a list or 14er guide can be a great source of ideas.



If this list seems limited—perhaps your local peaks are too complex or there aren’t many nearby—consider expanding this list to include all of Colorado’s 13,000-foot peaks. There are nearly 600 of these mountains in the state.

Together, the 13ers and 14ers give you 634 distinct mountains in the Colorado Rockies, from entry-level to extreme. That’s more than anyone could realistically explore in a lifetime.

The peaks are distributed throughout the state, divided into subranges, defined by varying geology and geography.

Searching for good snow on the flanks of Mont Blanc, 13,667 feet. (Ted Mahon)

Our local mountains around Aspen are known as the Elks. The Sawatch Range is east of Aspen across Independence Pass. You’ll find the Sangre de Cristos south of these mountains, which continue south into New Mexico.

The mountains of Summit County near Breckenridge and Lake Country near Leadville are part of the Tenmile/Mosquito Range. And the Front Range peaks are just west of Denver, Colorado Springs, and Boulder, as their name suggests.

The level of difficulty of the ski varies according to the sub-ranges. Generally speaking, the Elks and parts of the San Juans are some of the toughest and most technical mountains in the state. The Front Range, Tenmile/Mosquito, and Sawatch offer simpler, lower-angle options.

Depending on winter storm flow and spring progression, conditions may vary between sub-ranges. Some years the San Juans are a great destination in May. Other years they can be hot and dry or receive more dust due to their proximity to the Four Corners region.

Sometimes spring brings big “uphill” storms to the Front Range and Sangres, and when that happens the skiing can be great in these mountains. However, in the absence of these storms, they tend to be windblown and drier than other parts of the state.

If it’s late in the season, you might want to focus on Summit County and northern Sawatch. The higher elevation and colder temperatures often mean better snow cover that lasts longer than in other areas.

Snow conditions shouldn’t be the only factor in deciding which Colorado mountains to visit. It might be a good idea to plan a trip to an area you haven’t been to in a while. The nearby small towns that serve as launch points are always fun to visit.

Ouray, Silverton, and Lake City are always great places to incorporate into a trip to San Juan. Crestone or Westcliffe are small colorful communities near the Sangres. Leadville, Buena Vista or Salida are typical launch points for the Sawatch range.

Every time you pass by, you might find a new taco spot, cafe, or hot springs. Even if you don’t plan to spend a lot of time there – you could just stop on the way back – these small towns are part of the journey.

Approaching two 13ers, Carbonate Mountain and Cyclone Mountain, in the southern range of Sawatch. (Ted Mahon)

Recently we had a free weekend which coincided with favorable weather. A friend in Salida reported good skiing nearby in the southern Sawatch range. It had been a long time since my wife and I had skied these mountains. It was time to plan a trip.

We took a look at the long list of peaks and noted a few nearby that we thought might offer some good spring skiing. Several summers ago we hiked three mountains in the area: Cyclone, Carbonate and White. We knew the approach and what it would take to reach their peaks.

And just like that, a new Colorado backyard adventure was conceived.

There were a lot of unknowns. We knew the six mile approach would melt. So we didn’t know when we would reach the snow line and be on our skis. We also didn’t have a good idea of ​​the skiing conditions we might encounter.

But even without a full picture, the idea sounded fun, the location was appealing, and we were excited to start a season of sleeping under the stars. It was also something new for us, and that in itself was appealing. So we packed up the truck and hit the road.

By some measures, this has been more difficult than expected. We had to travel the entire six miles with skis and boots mounted on our overloaded backpacks for the night. And the effort felt just as hard on the way out. The snow wasn’t terrible either.

But the weather was as good as expected and there was no one around. So while we only found mediocre skiing, we were excited to check out three new peaks on our list. And after a long winter, it was also nice to camp.

After a long day, enjoy the first campfire of the season. (Ted Mahon)

We returned to Aspen on Sunday evening completely exhausted but happy. In the end, it was much more than an off-piste skiing trip. It was a road trip that included a night in Leadville and dinner afterwards in Buena Vista, heavy physical exertion, a fun night sleeping outside, and our first campfire of the season! Looking back, skiing the new 13ers was almost a minor detail.

And now we have a good picture of the snow conditions in the Sawatch and Sangre mountains. Unfortunately, unless the weather improves, the snow in this area will go fast and we will have to focus elsewhere. Its good. We have a long list to work with and many options.

Ted Mahon moved to Aspen to ski for a season 25 years ago and has been stuck in the Rockies ever since. Contact him at ted@tedmahon.com or on Instagram @tedmahon

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Why Ischgl should be your next ski trip https://walkonmountain.com/why-ischgl-should-be-your-next-ski-trip/ Tue, 10 May 2022 21:53:39 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/why-ischgl-should-be-your-next-ski-trip/ May 10, 2022 – 10:53 p.m. BST Matthew Moore The ski season may be over, but plan ahead for the next one and discover Ischgl, Austria’s favorite celebrity ski resort The ski season may be over, but now is the perfect time to plan ahead for the next one and look into the […]]]>





Matthew Moore




The ski season may be over, but now is the perfect time to plan ahead for the next one and look into the mountains of Ischgl, Austria, which offers some of the best runs and experiences for veteran skiers and newcomers alike.. But while skiing may be the main attraction, during my time there I discovered that the ski resort offered so much more, from glamorous restaurants to biking and other sporting activities, to a thriving summer of activity programs, it was all there.


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I was a first time skier when I headed to the practice slopes and Teresa’s tutelage, I was able to quickly start getting used to the snow sport and now I can’t wait for the next season of skiing where I will be sure to start my return to the slopes.


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But it’s not just slopes that this ski resort offers, as on its opening and closing days, it hosts a major concert, The Top of the Mountain, attracting megastar talent from around the world. This year the Kings of Leon have shut down, while previous stars have included the likes of Kylie Minogue, Katy Perry, Elton John and Robbie Williams.


Read on to find out more about this gem in the Austrian mountains, which always manages to attract the biggest stars.


Activities


Let’s be realistic, if you are on this article it means that you are interested in the ski offered to you, and with 239 km of slopes, there is something for all levels, in addition to an altitude of 2,000 meters above sea levelthe region is just perfect during the winter, and even in the first months of spring.


For a beginner like me, the practice trails offered a bit of a challenge, but as the hours passed, I grew more and more confident and filled with the desire to access some of the tougher ones. The station is divided into normal blue, red and black runs, so the station offers enough for everyone. AAnd for those feeling partially adventurous, there’s also the Smugglers’ Run, which stretches all the way to Samnaun, Switzerland and is named after it was once a route for tobacco smugglers.


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And it’s not just mountain skiing on offer, as you can choose to ski off-piste or try cross-country skiing in nearby Galtür. Skiing is not the only way to descend the mountains, because those in need of adrenaline can choose to luge down certain slopes, reaching speeds of up to 40 km/h.




ski ischgl


I became a proficient skier in no time


And for those of you who need more than skiing and sledding to get the juices flowing, you’re in luck, because there’s also fat biking available, and it’s definitely a trek. Maybe not one for those not in their best shape, as you climb the steep slopes all the way up a mountainous path to Galtür. Guaranteed to burn your legs! And if that’s not enough, in the nearby village of Kappl you can take snowshoe walks up the mountain, with great snowy views at the very top and a lovely chapel at the end.


But if you need a summer break, the area still offers a wide variety of activities not available in the winter months with mountain biking, hiking and even white water rafting.


Food


Iscghl is not called Tyrol’s gastronomic mecca for nothing, with all the surrounding hotels and restaurants offering all the best highlights of Tyrolean cuisine. We dined at our four star hotel, Hotel Sonne, most nights and were treated to some of the best examples of this cuisine from a varied menu.


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Another taste highlight for us was at Kappl, where we were treated to a magnificent meal where you cooked the meat to your liking yourself. Delicious in every sense of the word.



ischgl-fat-bike


The fat bike has been one of the hardest workouts I’ve done in a while


And when you go out skiing, check out the restaurant they have on the slopes, perfect to provide you with the energy you need to hope to get straight back on the slopes.


Location


The village of Ischgl itself is beautiful and very safe with face masks required even outside. Expect wonderful restaurants, the best bars to enjoy après-ski and local shops selling the best local produce you can get your hands on.


Hotels


The area offers a wide variety of four star hotels, and even a five star hotel, where we stayed at the beautiful Hotel Sonne, where many celebrities also like to stay, with a wall in the foyer dedicated to artists who have passed through the area.


Despite being high in the mountains, you wouldn’t know a thing, with the hotel always keeping you at the perfect temperature no matter what the outside thermometer is telling you. The spacious bedrooms have twin beds, a large TV and a shower you won’t want to leave.



ischgl-fat-scenery


The Austrian views were second to none


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The dining room is reserved for hotel guests in the upstairs section, while everyone is available to dine downstairs, and a large spa is available for guests. Featuring saunas, steam rooms, relaxation rooms and even an L-shaped swimming pool, it’s the perfect place to let the hours pass by when the slopes close for the night..


A day ski pass for Ischgl starts at £63 with prices rising for longer stays, with rooms from £95 per day at Hotel Sonne. Ski passes can be purchased at the hotel.

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Remember When: Eagle-Tribune Skiing MVPs | Sports https://walkonmountain.com/remember-when-eagle-tribune-skiing-mvps-sports/ Fri, 06 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/remember-when-eagle-tribune-skiing-mvps-sports/ Today, in our “Remember When” series, we feature the Eagle-Tribune ski MVPs. It’s impossible to highlight everyone and that’s certainly not the point here, but here are some random favorite ski MVP memories. We’ve had some brilliant ones. As always, how do you know? You check the results of the state competition, and that tells […]]]>

Today, in our “Remember When” series, we feature the Eagle-Tribune ski MVPs.

It’s impossible to highlight everyone and that’s certainly not the point here, but here are some random favorite ski MVP memories.

We’ve had some brilliant ones. As always, how do you know? You check the results of the state competition, and that tells you five times more than the prose of any sportswriter.

Skiing is a fun sport because there are very few colleges that offer it. Even on the east coast. So unlike many other sports, we can’t name too many big college stars.

But a ton of MIAA and NHIAA superstars.

Pinkerton’s Emilie Husson skied in Dartmouth, where she now attends medical school. She was our MVP in 2009 and then skied at Stratton Mountain School. She was almost born on the slopes because her father ran the Franconia Notch Ski Club. She’s not the only accomplished MVP. Haverhill’s Kara Kimball was class president.

Recently, Andover State Champion Jason Denoncourt (2017-19) was a three-time Tribune MVP. and when you say state champion for mass skiing. It is legitimate. There are not eight divisions like in some sports. Just one.

We started in 1992 with our first MVPs and there were a few good ones: Haverhill’s Rick Breen and Andover Hall of Fame Amy Heseltin.

The Marchegiani family of North Andover is special for local skiing.

Matt Marchegiani was our MVP in 2003. His father, Jerry Marchegiani, is Mr. Ski for area high schools. He coached for 47 years with the Scarlet Knights and is a tireless promoter of all local skiers. Our ski coach of the year is named after him.

The Eagle-Tribune MVPs show a terrific balance between boys and girls and schools in Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

Although most schools in the area do not have teams, we may have more schools represented in Skiing MVPs than in any other sport.

Skiing MVPs hail from Windham, Andover, Pinkerton, Timberlane, Haverhill, North Andover and Masconomet.

The only recipients were Denoncourt, Andover’s Nick Sherman (2010-11), Timberlane Julia Redman (2007-08), North Andover’s Alex Zahoruiko (2004-05) and Masco Caitlin Carey (1996-99).

E-MAIL: mmuldoon@eagletribune.com

TWITTER: @MullyET

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Ski Utah Pres. & CEO: Preliminary data for the season shows more local skiing https://walkonmountain.com/ski-utah-pres-ceo-preliminary-data-for-the-season-shows-more-local-skiing/ Thu, 05 May 2022 20:59:31 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/ski-utah-pres-ceo-preliminary-data-for-the-season-shows-more-local-skiing/ PARK CITY, Utah — Ski Utah President and CEO Nathan Rafferty told TownLift in an interview that tours for the 2021-22 season were “pretty similar” to the previous year, in which a new record was set with more than 5.3 million ski days. Data is still coming in for the season, which doesn’t officially end […]]]>

PARK CITY, Utah — Ski Utah President and CEO Nathan Rafferty told TownLift in an interview that tours for the 2021-22 season were “pretty similar” to the previous year, in which a new record was set with more than 5.3 million ski days.

Data is still coming in for the season, which doesn’t officially end until Snowbird closes. Based on preliminary numbers, “we actually saw more local skiers than destination customers than when we did this survey two years ago,” Rafferty said.

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He said there has been a big increase in local skiing recently and the traffic issues are not just related to an increase in customers at the destination. He noted that major markets like New York have seen a rebound in visits this season, but their biggest international market, Australia, was still closed due to Covid restrictions.

Park City Mountain recently announced that it will be implementing a paid reservation system next season. Rafferty said that as a “traffic mitigation tool” paid parking is “really useful”.

“We’re really catching up with a lot of the industry. It’s rare that you don’t pay for parking at the biggest ski areas in Colorado or California,” he said.

Next year, 20% of Ski Utah’s advertising budget will be devoted to “responsible travel”.

“What it looks like, instead of saying come ski the biggest snow in the world, we say when you come ski the biggest snow in the world, here’s how to do it.” — Nathan Rafferty, President and CEO of Ski Utah

Rafferty said the aim is to nudge people towards quieter points in the season and encourage the use of public transport and advance reservations.

He also praised the workers at the resort amid a season that has seen many challenges – streaks of snow, the omicron surge in December and labor shortages.

“It feels like the last two years have been two decades,” Rafferty said, referring to the pandemic’s impact on the state’s winter sports industry.

“Very, very difficult circumstances to run stations, and I am more than proud of the effort put in by the stations, including and especially all the employees who worked so hard this winter…many of them were working double shifts. work because they were covering for people.”

On a recent trip to Washington DC, he spoke to Utah officials about the need to increase J1 visas, which are essential for resort staffing during peak season.

He singled out Senator Mitt Romney and Representatives John Curtis and Blake Moore for their efforts related to climate change. “It was not that long ago, I would say five years ago, I couldn’t even say the words ‘climate change’ when I visited our delegation.”

Ski Utah also piloted a program called “Discover Winter” this season, which aims to diversify the slopes by primarily introducing immigrants to the sport and culture of skiing, with additional support from various ski shops and private donations.

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ISLAND STUDENTS ENJOY AN ACTION-PACKED SKI TRIP IN AUSTRIA – Island Echo https://walkonmountain.com/island-students-enjoy-an-action-packed-ski-trip-in-austria-island-echo/ Mon, 02 May 2022 12:00:02 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/island-students-enjoy-an-action-packed-ski-trip-in-austria-island-echo/ 38 enthusiastic students from Carisbrooke College, Medina College and The Island VI Form boarded the Fishbourne ferry at the start of the Easter holidays for a busy week of skiing and snowboarding. Accompanied by Miss Caddick, Mr. Rock, Mrs. Mackett and Mr. Jones, the students embarked on the 22-hour coach journey to Alpendorf, Austria. Upon […]]]>

38 enthusiastic students from Carisbrooke College, Medina College and The Island VI Form boarded the Fishbourne ferry at the start of the Easter holidays for a busy week of skiing and snowboarding.

Accompanied by Miss Caddick, Mr. Rock, Mrs. Mackett and Mr. Jones, the students embarked on the 22-hour coach journey to Alpendorf, Austria.

Upon arrival, the weather was glorious with blue skies and warm temperatures to complement the heavy snow conditions. 5 hours of lessons over 5 days allowed remarkable progress on the snow. On the last day, most were out to explore the mountain with their instructors and take in the views, remembering to dash into the speed trap before it melts too much.

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Miss Caddick, trip leader and physical education teacher at Medina College, said:

“Learning to ski and snowboard is extremely difficult. Some inspiring students have met this challenge head-on, and all have found new skills in the form of resilience and determination. It was a fantastic mix of students who kept themselves entertained, as well as the staff, all week.

Medina College student Lennon Stone said:

“Learning to snowboard was very difficult, but was one of the best experiences of my life. It was my first time and I really fell for it, but I loved every moment of it. I especially loved snowboarding all over the mountain as the view was amazing and it was a satisfying experience to see how much I progressed throughout the week.

IWEF Deputy Chief Executive and Head of Carisbrooke College Karen Begley said:

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“International trips like this broaden our students’ horizons and help them gain confidence and independence, among many other skills. It was amazing to see this moving forward after the tough time we all went through during the pandemic. The students made new friendships and memories that will last a lifetime.

Don’t miss another story! Get the The latest island news delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for our daily newsletter here.

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Cerro Catedral, Argentina, opens today for skiing | First opening in April https://walkonmountain.com/cerro-catedral-argentina-opens-today-for-skiing-first-opening-in-april/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 12:58:47 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/cerro-catedral-argentina-opens-today-for-skiing-first-opening-in-april/ Credit: Cerro Cathedral In a shock announcement yesterday, the Catedral Alta Patagonia in Argentina said it would open for skiing today, the first time it will open in April. The station usually opens in June. Kicking off the ski season in the southern hemisphere, Catedral Alta Patagonia sold 600 passes, 300 for each Friday and […]]]>
Credit: Cerro Cathedral

In a shock announcement yesterday, the Catedral Alta Patagonia in Argentina said it would open for skiing today, the first time it will open in April. The station usually opens in June.

Kicking off the ski season in the southern hemisphere, Catedral Alta Patagonia sold 600 passes, 300 for each Friday and Saturday.

“With the Cerro Catedral team, we want you to start enjoying winter. You can be one of the 300 who make the season premiere before anyone else.

– Complex Facebook post

The Andes this morning. Credit: EOSDIS NASA Worldview

On both days, the mountain will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Skiers will be able to ride the Sextuple Express and down the Lynch Piste, then back up the Lynch Chair.

“The truth is that I have no memory of such a heavy snowfall in April. Together we toyed with the idea of ​​opening a ski slope and something that started as a joke ended up become a reality.The team has not hesitated to get to work and offer a unique experience to those who want to make a descent in April.

– Matias Marcaccini, mountain manager

Due to the limited terrain, the opening is reserved for intermediate/advanced skiers, over the age of 12, and access to the ski lifts is only with an April Ski Promo pass.

Due to five-foot snowfalls in the area, resort crews managed to get the resort ready in just 48 hours so skiers and snowboarders can enjoy the first runs for what hopefully will be a long winter ahead. After such a dry year last year, which saw many resorts close early and some not open at all, early season snowfall is much needed.

Having not been to South America for two years, SnowBrains is looking forward to returning to our summer home for our twelfth ski season in Bariloche, Argentina.

cerro catedral, argentina,
Cerro Catedral trail map with the open trail highlighted

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After 33 years, Grand Targhee Cat Skiing makes way for lift access https://walkonmountain.com/after-33-years-grand-targhee-cat-skiing-makes-way-for-lift-access/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 20:19:07 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/after-33-years-grand-targhee-cat-skiing-makes-way-for-lift-access/ Home » News » After 33 years, Grand Targhee Cat Skiing makes way for lift access The legendary and beloved cat ski experience to Great Targhee won’t run anymore. Cat skiing is a form of guided backcountry exploration whereby skiers are transported beyond the boundaries of controlled ski areas into untouched powder. Rather than using […]]]>

The legendary and beloved cat ski experience to Great Targhee won’t run anymore.

Cat skiing is a form of guided backcountry exploration whereby skiers are transported beyond the boundaries of controlled ski areas into untouched powder. Rather than using a helicopter to access the backcountry, a snow cat acts as your personal Uber. Cat skiing is cheaper than heliskiing but gives skiers a similar sense of adventure.

And for 33 years, Grand Targhee has offered skiers cat rides to access expert ski terrain on Peaked Mountain.

But for the 2022-2023 ski season, the engine of the growling cat will fall silent, giving way to the hum of a chairlift bull’s wheel as a new chairlift comes to service the area. And while new chairlift access will open the station with increased capacity, it does so with a sense of nostalgic boredom.

“It is rare for a cat ski operation to be associated with a ski area,” noted Grand Targhee Resort in a blog post about the end of cat skiing on Peaked Mountain. “If you’ve had the chance to spend a day on the chat, you know how special a day at Peaked Mountain is.”

Cat Skiing makes way for a new chair

Until this winter, Great Targhee was the home of Wyoming’s only cat ski operation. The resort used two cats to service 602 dedicated acres of “lightweight, dry untraced Teton powder on our expansive cat-ski-only terrain.”

But for winter 2022-2023, Grand Targhee will open the Peaked Lift to service the historically snowcat-accessible terrain. The resort started installing this Doppelmayr D-Line 6-seater detachable chairlift in the summer of 2021.

Work worth more than $1 million – laying foundations for the tower and terminal as well as trenching and installing power/communications – has already taken place. During the summer of 2022, the towers and terminals will be installed. The resort aims to have the ground prepared for access to the ski lifts ready by this winter of 2022.

“The Peaked Lift will carry up to 2,000 people per hour and gain 1,815 vertical feet in just over five minutes,” the station noted in a Press release. “The Peaked area offers breathtaking views of the Tetons with access to over 600 acres of intermediate to advanced trails.”

Ski guide Paul Forester said, “With cat skiing being associated with Grand Targhee, the operation has incredible and wonderful benefits that people don’t think of.

“It’s partly because we have food and drink here. Every other cat ski operation in the world is scrambling to try and take care of the food, right? We have a beautiful base lodge; we start our mornings with snorkels and burritos, and when we come back there’s the Trap Bar.”

The resort says goodbye to cat skiing

Cat Ski Operations Team at Grand Targhee
(Photo/Grand Targhee Resort)

While the new lift will give many more skiers the chance to ride Peaked Mountain, the change, at least for the staff, is bittersweet. And those of us who have experienced a day of cat skiing – anywhere – can attest to the unique feeling of riding with a close-knit crew aboard a woodworking machine.

“I can’t tell you how many people said it was the best day of skiing they’ve ever had, or it was the best day of their life,” the Beach Huntsman employee said in the blog.

Cat skiers celebrating an epic day of off-piste skiing at the Grand Targhee Resort
A group of people celebrating a day of cat skiing in the backcountry; (photo/Grand Targhee Resort)

“It comes from people who have skied all their lives, not just random tourists, but skiers, who know skiing and have skied all over the world. Hearing this not only once in a while, but quite often, people are enlightened by it. We are there with them while they are having their best day ever. It’s pretty cool to be a part of it,” Huntsman continued.

Cat skiing officially began at Grand Targhee in 1989. However, prior to the inaugural season, the operation existed unofficially – in typical Targhee fashion.

Although a lot has changed since then, the popularity of catskiing has grown. But times change, and so do the slopes, lifts and resorts.

It’s hard to say goodbye to a ski lover like this. But the best cat ski days will have to be somewhere else. And with a new elevator in place, many more people will be making new memories on the resort’s world-class grounds.

Gary the ski cat with goggles and puffy sweater in Calgary with his owner
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view of the teton range peaks from the top of grand targhee ski resort
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A few miles from Jackson Hole, Grand Targhee Resort in Wyoming is smaller and less crowded, but still has a ton of ski trails. Here’s a guide to everything there is to enjoy while you’re there. Read more…
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Lady in a hat skiing in the mountains of Utah https://walkonmountain.com/lady-in-a-hat-skiing-in-the-mountains-of-utah/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 14:26:16 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/lady-in-a-hat-skiing-in-the-mountains-of-utah/ Since we had a late snowfall here last year in May, I hope I can still tell you about my recent ski trip to Utah. Utah is steeped in mining history, and when I arrived at our hotel, I saw that it thoughtfully incorporated design elements to evoke old western mine shafts. As the elevators […]]]>

Since we had a late snowfall here last year in May, I hope I can still tell you about my recent ski trip to Utah.

Utah is steeped in mining history, and when I arrived at our hotel, I saw that it thoughtfully incorporated design elements to evoke old western mine shafts. As the elevators ascended and descended, I thought of the people who had descended into those shafts to work in the perilous depths. Why hadn’t someone written a TV series about it, with the underground staff wielding axes while the mine owners lived off the plots above? The thought made me realize how important to us on vacation those who are employed to serve us.

To get to the cross-country trails, I took a van every day and listened intently to the van drivers talking. In simple strokes, they expressed the awe of the vastness that is Utah. Many of the gentlemen, who seemed mostly retired, had come from elsewhere to live out their years in sight of the mountains, valleys, ravines, ridges, aspens, mule deer and rock faces of Deer Valley. How they took to heart their love of this bare and peaceful land!

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Snowmaking for skiing can impact climate change https://walkonmountain.com/snowmaking-for-skiing-can-impact-climate-change/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/snowmaking-for-skiing-can-impact-climate-change/ Making snow for skiing can contribute to the same climate change issues that could one day have catastrophic effects on the ski industry.| MORE: Predicting our futureWhile there is still a lot of data to collect, recent trends show that mid-Atlantic ski resorts are seeing less and less natural snow and are increasingly relying on […]]]>

Making snow for skiing can contribute to the same climate change issues that could one day have catastrophic effects on the ski industry.| MORE: Predicting our futureWhile there is still a lot of data to collect, recent trends show that mid-Atlantic ski resorts are seeing less and less natural snow and are increasingly relying on artificial snow for continue to operate. Recreational skiing remains popular among people in the greater Baltimore area with several resorts just hours away. The slopes can be piled up as soon as the powder has fallen. “We’re kind of ready to go no matter what because we have 100% opportunity to make snow here on all of our mountains here in Pennsylvania. So we’re kind of ready to go no matter what. it happens,” said Andy DeBrunner, of Vail Resorts.| RELATED: Forecasting our future: Here’s how weather fluctuations affect ski areasVail Resorts owns Roundtop Mountain Resort in York County, Pa.; Liberty Mountain Resort in York County, Pa. ‘Adams, Pa.; Whitetail Mountain Resort in Franklin County, Pa.; and Jack Frost-Big Boulder in Carbon County, Pa. but this year, for example, we didn’t come close to that,” said DeBrunner. inches. But over the last three years, the average has only been 9.3 inches. “Almost all of our base will be artificial, and then whatever we get from Mother Nature on top of that, we’re happy to have it, my is we are definitely not counting on it,” DeBrunner said. DeBrunner explained that mid-Atlantic ski resorts depend almost entirely on artificial snow, and without it the resorts could not operate. is not only expensive, but can have harmful effects on the environment.Roundtop has already taken steps to reduce its carbon footprint by investing in more efficient snowmaking equipment and using ponds located at the foot of the mountain as a source of water. snow melts, water returns to ponds for reuse. Roundtop is also upgrading the lifts and adding LED lighting throughout the resort. important thing that we own and lead in this region as well,” DeBrunner said. could spell trouble for the ski industry.

Making snow for skiing can contribute to the same climate change issues that could one day have catastrophic effects on the ski industry.

| AFTER: Forecasting our future

While there is still much more data to collect, recent trends show mid-Atlantic ski resorts seeing less and less natural snow and relying more and more on man-made snow to continue operating. .

Recreational skiing remains popular among residents of the greater Baltimore area, with several resorts just hours away. Slopes can be compacted as soon as the powder has fallen.

“We’re kind of ready to go no matter what because we have 100% opportunity to make snow here on all of our mountains here in Pennsylvania. So we’re kind of ready to go whatever let it happen,” said Andy DeBrunner, with Vail Resorts.

| RELATED: Predicting our future: how weather fluctuations affect ski areas

Vail Resorts owns Roundtop Mountain Resort in York County, Pennsylvania; Liberty Mountain Resort in Adams County, Pennsylvania; Whitetail Mountain Resort in Franklin County, Pennsylvania; and Jack Frost-Big Boulder in Carbon County, Pennsylvania.

DeBrunner told 11 News that while resorts have been entering the majority of the ski season lately, natural snowfall totals have dropped.

“I think our average tends to be around 30 inches, but this year, for example, we haven’t come close to that,” DeBrunner said.

According to OnTheSnow.com, a website that tracks snowfall totals at ski resorts, the average annual snowfall over the past 10 years at Roundtop was 29 inches. But over the past three years, the average has only been 9.3 inches.

“Almost all of our base will be artificial, and anything we get from Mother Nature on top of that, we’re happy to have, but we’re definitely not counting on it,” DeBrunner said.

DeBrunner explained that mid-Atlantic ski resorts depend almost entirely on artificial snow, and without it the resorts could not operate.

The snowmaking process is not only expensive, but can have detrimental effects on the environment.

snow making at roundtop hill station

Roundtop has already taken steps to reduce its carbon footprint by investing in more efficient snowmaking equipment and using ponds at the foot of the mountain as a source of water, so that when the snow melts, the water returns in ponds for reuse.

Roundtop is also upgrading the elevators and adding LED lighting throughout the station.

“As a company inextricably linked to weather and climate, we consider it very important that we take ownership and lead in this area as well,” DeBrunner said.

Mid-Atlantic ski resorts will continue to tune into the weather, hoping for colder winters, because if temperatures continue to rise over the next few years or even decades, it could cause problems to the ski industry.

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