Mountain biking – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 23:00:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://walkonmountain.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/favicon-5-120x120.png Mountain biking – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ 32 32 Video: At the intersection of mountain biking and local craft breweries in northern British Columbia https://walkonmountain.com/video-at-the-intersection-of-mountain-biking-and-local-craft-breweries-in-northern-british-columbia/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 14:04:38 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/video-at-the-intersection-of-mountain-biking-and-local-craft-breweries-in-northern-british-columbia/ “Ale Trails” is a doc-style miniseries that examines the intersection between mountain biking and local craft breweries, and how the two work to support and improve their community. Join us as we explore the wilderness of northern British Columbia, showcasing the uniqueness of Prince George, Terrace and Smithers, and meet the proud and passionate locals […]]]>
“Ale Trails” is a doc-style miniseries that examines the intersection between mountain biking and local craft breweries, and how the two work to support and improve their community. Join us as we explore the wilderness of northern British Columbia, showcasing the uniqueness of Prince George, Terrace and Smithers, and meet the proud and passionate locals who inhabit these close-knit communities.

Prince George. The largest city in northern British Columbia has a thriving craft beer and mountain biking scene. Between its 2 breweries, Trench Brewing & Crossroads Brewery and Distillery, and the ever-expanding Pidherny trail system, there is enough variety to keep any seasoned rider and craft beer enthusiast busy.

Smithers, nestled in the Bulkley Valley, is animated by a passionate population. Its trail system, cultivated from hardcore locals in the 90s, has evolved into a modern network of sustainable mountain trails and its breweries, Smithers Brewing and Bulkley Valley Brewing, will welcome you with the warm northern atmosphere and flavors to keep your thirst quenched.
Terrace has a history of being a very technical place, but in recent years has used grants to expand and create new mixed-capacity trails that allow all riders to have fun.
Home to Sherwood Mountain Brewing, Terrace’s craft beer scene brings a variety of beer styles and flavors to what has generally been a very lager-based town.

“Ale Trails” is a collaboration between Mountain Biking BC and the BC Ale Trail, and produced by adventure filmmakers Ben Haggar and Mike Gamble / Cold Salt Collective

Special thanks to:
Patio Tour, Patio Off-Road Cycling Association, Sherwood Mountain Brewing
Tourism Smithers, Smithers Mountain Bike Association, Bulkley Valley Brewing, Smithers Brewing
Tourism Prince George, Prince George Cycling Club, Crossroads Brewing & Distillery, Trench Brewing


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Quaker Valley junior builds 2 ATV bridges for the Eagle Scout project https://walkonmountain.com/quaker-valley-junior-builds-2-atv-bridges-for-the-eagle-scout-project/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 12:01:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/quaker-valley-junior-builds-2-atv-bridges-for-the-eagle-scout-project/ Spencer Wiehe, a junior at Quaker Valley High School has a passion for mountain biking. The combination of speed, terrain and the beauty of nature can attract many teenagers to this hobby. It was in part this love of cycling that led Wiehe to choose his Eagle Scout project. With the help of Trail Pittsburgh, […]]]>

Spencer Wiehe, a junior at Quaker Valley High School has a passion for mountain biking.

The combination of speed, terrain and the beauty of nature can attract many teenagers to this hobby.

It was in part this love of cycling that led Wiehe to choose his Eagle Scout project. With the help of Trail Pittsburgh, Wiehe built two mountain bike bridges in North Park.

The process took about six months from start to finish. The goal of Eagle Scout projects is not only to do something good for the community, but also to ensure that a Scout demonstrates the necessary leadership qualities as an adult.

Wiehe had several tasks that he himself had to accomplish before enlisting volunteers and building the bridges.

The steps included choosing a project; create a budget and establish funds for the project; draft a proposal for approval by regional leaders; recruit volunteers; complete the project; and discuss the project with a review committee.

With the help of some 20 Scouts and volunteers, the two bridges were completed over two weekends in October.

“Seeing the outpouring of answers really makes you see that people are there for you,” Wiehe said.

Jamie Pfaeffle, a volunteer at Trail Pittsburgh, helped Wiehe coordinate the project and echoed his sentiments.

“Trail Pittsburgh has had many scouts to help with projects over time, and I’ve never had a bad experience with any. They are always well organized and have a full additional support team thanks to volunteers and Scout families.

While municipalities and the Commonwealth can manage various aspects of park maintenance, there is always more to do.

“The areas that Spencer improved are used very well, in part because of the proximity to the Nature Center. Mountain bikers, trail runners, dog walkers and those who participate in guided nature hikes all use this area and will benefit from Spencer’s work, ”said Pfaeffle. It will also help naturalists in the region to access wetlands. Without volunteers to help, there would be none of these great public trails.

Spencer lives in Sewickley with his father, Oliver, and sister, Grace. His family has a long history of Scout accomplishments. Her father is the Scout Leader of Troop 243, her brother, Travis, 22, has reached the rank of Eagle Scout, and her sister, Elizabeth, 20, is a Gold Award recipient in Girl Scouts.


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Mountain biking gives this Tasmanian town a sustainable future. Logging does not https://walkonmountain.com/mountain-biking-gives-this-tasmanian-town-a-sustainable-future-logging-does-not/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 00:25:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/mountain-biking-gives-this-tasmanian-town-a-sustainable-future-logging-does-not/ At the end of the 19th century, it was the mining of tin that animated the economic life of Derby, about 100 km from Launceston in north-eastern Tasmania. But the mine has closed for a long time. From a peak of over 3,000, in the 2016 census, Derby’s population was 178, with an unemployment rate […]]]>

At the end of the 19th century, it was the mining of tin that animated the economic life of Derby, about 100 km from Launceston in north-eastern Tasmania. But the mine has closed for a long time. From a peak of over 3,000, in the 2016 census, Derby’s population was 178, with an unemployment rate of 20%.

The location of Derby in northeast Tasmania.

What kept Derby from becoming another mining ghost town was finding a more sustainable mountain resource: mountain biking.

This transition could be seen as a model for the world, a story of hope for mining communities seeking to move from unsustainable resource extraction to something more about maintaining balance with nature.

But there is something that opposes this view. As in many parts of Tasmania and elsewhere, the forests through which the trails of the Blue Derby Trail have been constructed are still threatened by logging.

Origins of the Derby adventure

In 2015, with funding from the federal government, two local councils (Dorset Council and Break O’Day Council) opened the first 20 km section of the Blue Derby Trail Network, a system of mountain biking trails that spans now for 125 km in temperate old-growth rainforest, meeting a range of skill levels and driving styles.

There are easy trails such as “Crusty Rusty” a “mostly hilly” trail with two crossings of the local Cascade River. There are extremely difficult trails, such as “23 Stitches”, 800 meters of “fast, downhill jumping track, littered with jumps of land, rollers and tables”.

The 23 points, classified as “extremely difficult”

The attractions of the Blue Derby Trail Network were quickly recognized by interstate and international mountain biking enthusiasts. In 2017, Dorset Council Mayor Greg Howard boasted that the trails attracted 30,000 visitors per year, with the initial investment of $ 3.1 million bringing in $ 30 million per year.

Turmoil in the midst of renewal

Logging of Tasmania’s public forests is overseen by the state-owned company known as Sustainable Timber Tasmania (formerly Forestry Tasmania). It manages 816,000 hectares of public forest classified as “Land of the Permanent Wood Production Zone”. This area represents about 12% of the total land area of ​​Tasmania and 24% of its forests.

Each year, Sustainable Timber Tasmania must extract 137,000 cubic meters of logs from these forests. He maintains a “three-year plan” for the parts of Tasmania that he is going to save. He updated this document in July 2021.

This plan includes logging two cuts (CC105A and C119A) covering 85 hectares that line the Blue Derby trail system by the end of the year. A third cut, covering 40 hectares, is planned for a clear cut in 2022.

Part of the Blue Derby trail system.
Part of the Blue Derby trail system.
Blue Derby Pods ride, CC BY

Local opinions on this journaling are mixed. Dorset Council Mayor Greg Howard said it would make no difference for mountain bike trails. Environmentalists and others are more defiant. The local conservation group Blue Derby Wild has organized protests involving cyclists, hikers and activists.



Read more: Trails being tested: what human uses are acceptable for protected areas?


This battle between logging and outdoor recreation in Derby illustrates the conflict between extraction and conservation that affects communities in Tasmania, Australia and the world.

The value of mountain biking tourism

This week, more than 180 Tasmanian tourism companies signed an open letter calling on the state government to end logging in native forests. The letter says:

Brand Tasmania promises an island at the end of the world where ancient forests and wild rivers wait to reconnect people to their wild side, through nature-based tourism experiences not found anywhere else on earth.

Mountain biking has become an increasingly valuable part of this tourist mix since the late 1990s, when communities in iconic destinations such as Moab, Utah and Whistler, B.C. began building trails for mountain biking. Mountain bike.

<a class=Mountain biker in Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah.” class=”lazyload” src=”https://images.theconversation.com/files/431415/original/file-20211111-21-1hob0f3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&fit=clip” srcset=”https://images.theconversation.com/files/431415/original/file-20211111-21-1hob0f3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=600&h=337&fit=crop&dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/431415/original/file-20211111-21-1hob0f3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=30&auto=format&w=600&h=337&fit=crop&dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/431415/original/file-20211111-21-1hob0f3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=15&auto=format&w=600&h=337&fit=crop&dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/431415/original/file-20211111-21-1hob0f3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&h=424&fit=crop&dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/431415/original/file-20211111-21-1hob0f3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=30&auto=format&w=754&h=424&fit=crop&dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/431415/original/file-20211111-21-1hob0f3.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=15&auto=format&w=754&h=424&fit=crop&dpr=3 2262w” sizes=”(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px”/>
Mountain biker in Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah.
Shutterstock

Although the size and value of the industry internationally is difficult to assess, ATV tourists are generally wealthy. They travel an average of 12 nights per year, spending US $ 130-230 each day of their visit. A study published in March 2021 (commissioned by the AusCycling group and funded by the Federal Government’s Building Better Region Fund) estimates that the Australian mountain biking market is worth around A $ 600 million per year, supporting more than 6,000 jobs.

How does ATV tourism compare to the value of logging? Again, although there are no studies that directly quantify this, comparisons between logging and ecotourism more generally point to the latter. A study on the economic contribution of ecotourism compared to logging in the Wet Tropics region of Queensland, for example, found that ecotourism was worth up to ten times more than logging.

In Tasmania, the tourism industry directly employs around 21,000 people, compared to around 2,500 in logging (at the time of the 2016 census).

Clear choice

Derby was a pioneer in mountain biking tourism. Communities looking to emulate his success include Harcourt in Victoria, York in Western Australia. and Mogo in New South Wales – which is also fighting logging plans threatening mountain bike trails.



Read more: Don’t Walk So Close To Me: How Human Presence Can Disrupt Wildlife Up To 800 Meters


Mountain bikers primarily seek destinations based on the quality of the trail networks, the appeal of the terrain, and the appeal of the natural landscape. But the support of the local community and politicians is just as important.

In Derby, the choice between logging and sustainable tourism must be clear. The mining did not last. Journaling either. Long-term protections are needed now.


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Orange County panel hears complaints about mountain bike accidents https://walkonmountain.com/orange-county-panel-hears-complaints-about-mountain-bike-accidents/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 19:37:46 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/orange-county-panel-hears-complaints-about-mountain-bike-accidents/ A mountain biker rides the ridge above the Telonics Trail on May 19, 2020. Photo by Daniel Langhorne Hikers exasperated by a demanding segment of the mountain biking community urged OC Parks staff to devote more resources to trail enforcement at the Coastal Greenbelt Authority meeting on Wednesday. The panel overseeing the management of 22,000 […]]]>
A mountain biker rides the ridge above the Telonics Trail on May 19, 2020. Photo by Daniel Langhorne

Hikers exasperated by a demanding segment of the mountain biking community urged OC Parks staff to devote more resources to trail enforcement at the Coastal Greenbelt Authority meeting on Wednesday.

The panel overseeing the management of 22,000 acres of open space spread between Laguna Coast and Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park received an update from OC Parks Deputy Director Pam Passow on a pilot program that reserves two public trails only for downhill mountain biking. Orange County Parks Commissioners approved the program in June as a possible solution to speeding up mountain bikers who almost collide with hikers.

OC Parks partnered with researchers at Utah State University to collect and analyze data on who used certain trails and whether they were using them according to the pilot program, Passow said. The researchers will present their findings at a meeting of the County Parks Commission subcommittee at 7 p.m. on December 1 at OC Parks headquarters, 13042 Old Myford Rd. In Irvine.

Hikers like Peggy Koyama say that part of the mountain biking community feels entitled to go as fast as they want downhill and that there just aren’t enough OC park rangers. to write tickets. A high-speed cyclist recently came within a foot of hitting Koyama as she walked near a blind bend on Lizard Trail in Laguna Coast Wilderness.

“I realize the bureaucracy of the whole situation and I realize that they don’t have the bodies to enforce the rules,” she said.

County officials should require mountain bikers to mount bells on their bikes so hikers can hear them coming and straying, Koyama said. She acknowledged that this would likely become another unenforceable rule in the backcountry.

Mark Goodley, a mountain biker and hiker, said it was unreasonable to expect cyclists to obey 10 miles per hour on the slopes seen in the OC Parks trail system.

“At the end of the day, you’re going to have to keep people separate,” he said. “You can’t have people going that fast at this level in combination with all the hikers. “

He added that county officials risked being held liable if someone died in a collision with a trail because they failed to mitigate the risk to public safety.

Last year, OC Parks saw a surge of visitors during the pandemic as the public sought safe outdoor activities. Laguna Beach Mayor Bob Whalen has recommended city employees work with the county to ensure that city-owned and county-managed land is used safely. Deputy City Manager Ken Domer has coordinated these efforts since joining Laguna Beach in June.

Eight OC park rangers recently started their training at the academy, John Gannaway, director of the OC parks division. They have already received trail orientation from the Laguna Canyon Foundation Wilderness Park and will begin their field training program soon.

A helmet camera video showing mountain bikers mocking surprised hikers was shared at the Greenbelt Authority meeting on Wednesday.

“This is what we see every time we go out on the trails,” said hiker Armando Nunez. “I encourage OC Parks to implement these 10 miles an hour, because that is not happening today.”

Despite these antics being broadcast on Youtube, SHARE Mountain Bike Club continues to promote safe and respectful cycling behavior and has advised county officials on which trails would be good candidates for the pilot program, club president Steve Larson said. .

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On the trail: safe haven for hiking, mountain biking during firearm deer season | GO https://walkonmountain.com/on-the-trail-safe-haven-for-hiking-mountain-biking-during-firearm-deer-season-go/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/on-the-trail-safe-haven-for-hiking-mountain-biking-during-firearm-deer-season-go/ Terrell Rifle deer hunting season kicks off in just under a week, and the woods are a place non-hunters shouldn’t be. Your safety is the main reason, but respect for hunters, who only have a narrow window of time to enjoy their sport, is another good reason. Non-hunters have the rest of the year to […]]]>






Terrell




Rifle deer hunting season kicks off in just under a week, and the woods are a place non-hunters shouldn’t be.

Your safety is the main reason, but respect for hunters, who only have a narrow window of time to enjoy their sport, is another good reason. Non-hunters have the rest of the year to pursue their outdoor activities.

Fortunately, there are several attractive outdoor sites that do not allow hunting and are therefore safe for hiking and biking for the rest of the month.

A collection of columns from Record-Eagle Outdoors columnist Mike Terrell:

The Maplehurst Natural Area, one of the more recent areas opened by the Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy, is non-hunting and has a few miles of trails that can provide a good workout depending on the trail choice.

The natural space opened its doors just a few years ago. November is a wonderful month to get out along the ridge trails which offer breathtaking views of the vivid blue waters of Torch Lake through the trees with the leaves down. From spring to the end of October, you barely see the blue through the thick coat of leaves.

Another good news is that the Stream Trail now has a bridge over the creek. It wasn’t ideal for mountain bikers before, as crossing the creek was not easy – that is, tiptoeing while pushing a bike. I have been wet more than once. Now you can cross.

The Stream Trail is my favorite section of trail on the reserve. It offers fascinating views of sinkholes and deep ravines, as the trail often runs along the side of the ridge with deep drops along the outside. It keeps you on the edge of your pedals. I will stop every now and then just to take in the view, trying to see the bottom of the chasms, looking through the trees at the mesmerizing views of the lake. As I pedal I focus on the trail, which rarely flows straight along odd-shaped, curved, and bent ridges.

The GTRLC trail builders have done a great job around the flowing trails in the ridges. You have a drop of over 200 feet when you exit the meadow area of ​​the trailhead and find yourself briefly on Torch Lake Drive below. The trail crosses the bottom of a former alpine ski area that closed in the mid-1950s. You can see where the day lodge was as you walk across.

The 140-acre Grand Traverse Natural Area in the high hills on the west side of town offers beautiful hiking trails with awe-inspiring views as a bonus. Trails, some covered with wood chips, climb, descend and skirt wooded hills, cross streams, and skirt meadows and wetlands. They are well marked with signs at intersections with maps and colorful arrows posted along the trails.

There are a plethora of hiking trails in Hickory Hills and Hickory Meadows. Take a stroll through the Great Prairie or climb up the wooded hillsides to admire magnificent panoramic views of West Bay and the city below. It’s a good climb, but well worth it for some stunning views.

The Grand Traverse Nature Education Reserve offers a few miles of interesting trails that overlook the Boardman River which now flows freely with the removal of the dam. Trailheads are located at the Oleson Bridge and Lone Pine off Keystone Road and the Nature Center off Cass Road. You can often spot wildlife, especially water birds, along these short hikes.

Pelizzari Natural Area is located at the foot of the Old Mission Peninsula. Trails run around an old orchard and remaining farm fields, through upland deciduous forests and a section of old-growth hemlock forest above East Shore Drive and East Bay. Quaint and peaceful best describes this hike.

Brown Bridge Quiet Area offers several miles of easy to strenuous trails.

The trails meander along a ridge with some lookout points of the Boardman River winding through the valley. You can also hike along the river and through some of the wetlands bordering the river. Deer hunting is not allowed in the central area. The trails start from the two starting points of Ranch Rudolf Road and that of Brown Bridge Road.

For mountain bikers, miles of wooded trails wind through hills and valleys in Hanson Hills, near Grayling. As part of the Hanson Game Reserve, no hunting is permitted. There are several combinations of trails and difficulty levels that cater to both mountain bikers and hikers.


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‘Renaissance’: Beloved Mountain Biking Trails Bring New Life to the Iron Chain – WCCO https://walkonmountain.com/renaissance-beloved-mountain-biking-trails-bring-new-life-to-the-iron-chain-wcco/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/renaissance-beloved-mountain-biking-trails-bring-new-life-to-the-iron-chain-wcco/ IRONTON, Minnesota (WCCO) – In the early 1900s, it was iron ore that brought people to the Cuyuna Range. Speed ​​up 100 years and now the trails have become the destination. “Ten years ago the mountain bike trails opened and about 34 years ago the idea started,” said Aaron Hautala. READ MORE: Waukesha Christmas parade […]]]>

IRONTON, Minnesota (WCCO) – In the early 1900s, it was iron ore that brought people to the Cuyuna Range. Speed ​​up 100 years and now the trails have become the destination.

“Ten years ago the mountain bike trails opened and about 34 years ago the idea started,” said Aaron Hautala.

READ MORE: Waukesha Christmas parade crash: bail for suspect Darrell Brooks raises questions

Hautala is the former president of the Cuyuna Lakes Mountain Bike Crew, a club with over 300 members. He said that years ago, women and girls wanted to protect the land that their husbands and sons worked. So they came up with the idea of ​​using human-powered sports to preserve Mother Nature.

“When I speak across the country they say to me, ‘OK, you turned a mining area into a mountain bike. How did it work? “Even when the slopes were opened, I didn’t understand how amazing they were going to be,” Hautala said.

Federal and state funding as well as numerous fundraisers have made it possible to build 55 scenic miles of one-way trails. As the trails grew in popularity, business in towns like Crosby, Ironton, Rivertown, and Cuyuna also increased.

“The word that I have heard used and that I really love is ‘rebirth’,” Hautala said. “I moved here 11 years ago and in the last 11 years there have been well over 25 new businesses. They weren’t there before.

“I graduated in 2004 and there was really nothing to do,” said cyclist Mari Kivisto. “Today you can walk down the main street and we have cafes, bike shops, a homemade ice cream parlor, pizzas and restaurants.”

New seaside resorts like Cuyuna Cove, with their huts on stilts, are aimed at outdoor enthusiasts. There are also new residents. Jim McCarvill moved to the Minneapolis shooting range. He said the area is bustling.

READ MORE: State Patrol: 1 killed when driver of straight truck ends up in semi-trailer in St. Cloud

“Last weekend was packed,” he said. “The restaurants were full.”

The trails too. But when you have more than 50 kilometers, there is always room for more cyclists. There are trails for beginners and trails for experts. With its “very difficult” designation, Cruser’s Kettle has a few bumps in the road.

“All of a sudden you will be rolling and there will be a rock fall or rock climb or there will be a rock feature stretching that you are going to ride,” Hautala said.

This is the type of mountain bike you see in the west. But the goal is to get mountain bikers to consider the Midwest, especially Cuyuna. It may already be happening. Last year, during the pandemic, 160,000 cyclists rode these trails, easily setting a record.

Many of these visitors came from other states, and it was all thanks to mountain bikers who led the way.

“If you go the whole 55 miles, depending on who you are, you will find a place that you like,” Hautala said.

By the end of next year, an additional 20 miles of trails will be added, meaning there will be over 70 miles of biking on the Cuyuna Lakes mountain bike trails. Paddleboarding, kayaking, and hiking have also become popular in the area.

NO MORE NEWS: Dodge Center man hospitalized for assessment after standoff with authorities

For more information, click here.


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Mountain biking leads the way in Marshall County | New https://walkonmountain.com/mountain-biking-leads-the-way-in-marshall-county-new/ Tue, 02 Nov 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/mountain-biking-leads-the-way-in-marshall-county-new/ Marshall County and the Lake District have attracted anglers, boaters and campers for years, making the area a premier destination. Now, the success of a recent state mountain bike race could potentially open the door for additional visitors to enjoy the local environment and possibly a new economic avenue. Kentucky Dam Village State Park hosted […]]]>

Marshall County and the Lake District have attracted anglers, boaters and campers for years, making the area a premier destination. Now, the success of a recent state mountain bike race could potentially open the door for additional visitors to enjoy the local environment and possibly a new economic avenue.

Kentucky Dam Village State Park hosted the Kentucky First Inter-School Cycling League (KICL) State Championship on October 24 with nearly 150 participants affiliated with a dozen Marshall County teams (which has won his eighth state title) and a composite team of runners from McCracken County Schools and Paducah to Clark County in east-central Kentucky.

“It’s been a really good weekend,” said Steve Beckett, former head coach of the Marshall County mountain bike team and co-founder and director of KICL. “It helps when the weather is good. People like to go out. We have food trucks and various amenities for them. So when you can sit here by the lake, enjoy a breeze and it’s not too hot like our other races, everyone loves it.

“It was good for the park (and) for Calvert City,” he added.

Besides the surroundings, Beckett said the first-ever National Mountain Bike Championship offered a glimpse of a new sport and its potential to gain momentum in a sporting state best known for hoops, horses and hunting. .

“I think the people who came and had never been to a race before were probably too impressed,” he said. “They didn’t realize what everything is involved; the establishment, the infrastructure put in place. It takes a small army to do that.

This army has recruited volunteers and increased its numbers in Marshall County and Kentucky since the idea sprouted in Beckett’s head in 2012 to find a competitive school cycling organization for his son Carson, who was a freshman. year at MCHS.

In 2013, Tennessee launched their mountain bike league and Beckett approached officials there if his son and a Kentucky team could compete in the Volunteer State. With their approval and that of Marshall County school officials, Marshall had the first and only mountain bike team affiliated with the school in the Bluegrass.

Sixteen student bikers were part of this inaugural team in 2013, which each won the Tennessee State Championships until 2019, which was the last time Marshall County competed with this league before the last year does not cancel its season and that the KICL is formed.

Beckett said the formation of the new team provided an additional opportunity for students to showcase their talents for Marshall County. “It is the pride of children who do not participate in traditional sports; get the Marshall County logo and be recognized at Meet the Marshals and feel like they are part of a college program, even if it is not part of the (Kentucky High School Athletic Association). ”

Still, the goal was to develop interest and sport at home. To do this, Beckett and the core of Marshall’s team and boosters had to ask other people from all over Kentucky to see what Tennessee was doing. They encouraged people to form individual or composite teams from two or three schools to participate.

“They witnessed it and said, ‘Hey, we need this in Kentucky,’” Beckett recalls. “I said to myself: ‘No kidding! “”

After pitching the idea to the National Interscholastic Cycling Association (NICA) and forming teams in Lexington, Louisville and Elizabethtown, they were approved two years ago to form the KICL for its start-up season in 2021.

This inaugural year had five races starting at Barren River State Park, Capitol View Park in Frankfort, Buffalo Lake in Elizabethtown and Veterans Park in Lexington before ending at Kentucky Dam Village for the state meet.

And there are other programs besides racing within the NICA and state leagues. There is a girls-only program called GRIT (Girls Riding Together), a scout-like program called the Teen Trail Corps where bikers earn badges for community services such as trail maintenance and park cleaning, and a program adventure more oriented towards exploration, “biking and hiking” and overnight camping.

Five years ago, Beckett created the Marshall County Mountain Bike Trail which covers approximately 10 miles. In recent years, he said they’ve created a trail system in Livingston County, Eddyville and Land Between the Lakes.

With KICL, whose board of directors includes Carson Beckett, Michael Yarbrough of Benton and Ralph Jennings of Grand Rivers, and continued to promote mountain biking in Western Kentucky, the area could potentially be an adventure destination. similar to the Red River Gorge site in eastern Kentucky near Natural Bridge State Park. , which attracts climbers from all over the world to their cliffs.

“If you count Land Between the Lakes, you have almost 100 miles at four sites,” Beckett said. “People can come and spend the money and walk a different trail every day for three or four days.

“Communities that have a bike culture, they start building these bike destination parks where they have a pump track for the kids, skill areas where you can ride logs and ledges, and you have trails. “, he added. “These are the people who get it and attract people for days.”


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Hello: New Mountain Bike Trail Opens in Brown County SP | Short holds https://walkonmountain.com/hello-new-mountain-bike-trail-opens-in-brown-county-sp-short-holds/ Sat, 30 Oct 2021 11:20:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/hello-new-mountain-bike-trail-opens-in-brown-county-sp-short-holds/ NASHVILLE – The DNR and the Hoosier Mountain Bike Association (HMBA) recently made a ribbon cut to mark the opening of Limekiln East, a newly completed 1.6-mile mountain bike trail for beginners in National Park. Brown County. Limekiln East is the second of three mountain bike trails to be completed in the state park as […]]]>

NASHVILLE – The DNR and the Hoosier Mountain Bike Association (HMBA) recently made a ribbon cut to mark the opening of Limekiln East, a newly completed 1.6-mile mountain bike trail for beginners in National Park. Brown County.

Limekiln East is the second of three mountain bike trails to be completed in the state park as part of a $ 200,000 grant to the HMBA to develop 7.5 miles of new mountain bike trails. The first, Weed Patch Trail, a 2.4 mile mid-level trail, opened in November 2019.

The three new trails funded by the NLT will connect to existing trails as well as other park amenities including the campground, park office, nature center and Hesitation Point.

When completed, the three new trails will bring the total mileage of mountain bike trails in the state park to 43.5.

The park’s existing Limekiln West Trail connects the campground to Hoosier’s Nest, fire tower, and park office. Prior to the opening of the Limekiln East Trail, beginner mountain bikers (as well as hikers and runners) used Limekiln West as a round trip.

The addition of Limekiln East turns the old round trip into a 3.7 mile beginner directional loop for daytime park visitors. Limekiln East not only adds miles for novice and experienced riders, but also reduces congestion on the popular trail.

Brown County State Park’s mountain biking trails are multi-use and are open for hiking and running as well as biking. Cyclists must obtain a $ 5 per day or $ 20 per year off-road bike pass before using the park’s mountain bike trails. Passes can be purchased at the gates, at the park office, or at ShopINStateParks.com.


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West Virginia’s New Mountain Bike Trails Gets Gentle, Not Wild https://walkonmountain.com/west-virginias-new-mountain-bike-trails-gets-gentle-not-wild/ Wed, 27 Oct 2021 16:32:34 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/west-virginias-new-mountain-bike-trails-gets-gentle-not-wild/ Mountain biking, like other outdoor activities, has grown in popularity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Bike sales increased by more than 150% in 2020, and some mountain bike trails saw more than five times the increase in traffic, said David Wiens, executive director of the International Mountain Bicycling Association. These new runners, many of whom are […]]]>

Mountain biking, like other outdoor activities, has grown in popularity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Bike sales increased by more than 150% in 2020, and some mountain bike trails saw more than five times the increase in traffic, said David Wiens, executive director of the International Mountain Bicycling Association.

These new runners, many of whom are children or families, present a challenge and an opportunity for areas of the United States where this warmer weather, often the sport of downhill, is prevalent. This is why mountainous states like Colorado, California, and Utah are turning to “flow” style paths.

Where old-fashioned mountain bike trails were often rugged and steep, the smooth courses aim to make it easier for newbies to the sport with smoother surfaces, wider widths and sloping edges. Rolling and scenic, the Flow Trails are named for the way they put cyclists in a concentrated trance state where the rest of the world crumbles. “It’s a rhythmic, almost musical way of the track interacting with a mountain bike,” says Wiens.

These easier and more elegant cycle paths are also found all over the Appalachians. West Virginia, which experiences less snow for skiing due to climate change, has been at the forefront of the movement, hoping to attract tourists who use two wheels instead of two poles.

Gnarly more

“West Virginia is known for its mountain biking, but the trails here tend to be hard and gnarly,” says Doug Arbogast, professor of tourism at the West Virginia University Extension Service. “Our reputation is that West Virginia is a great place to be tortured and abused.”

That’s not the case on the new 3.2-mile Rock and Roll Trail from Cacapon Resort State Park in Berkley Springs, where Kevin Ellsworth and his five-year-old son Landon ride regularly. “This is the best family trail,” says Kevin of the flow style course. “My wife is a beginner and she can ride it. Landon can ride it. I like it and I run professionally.

Trails like this are popping up across West Virginia as part of a concerted effort to attract mountain bikers as tourists and new residents, while giving locals more ways to get active in the great outdoors, explains Chelsea Ruby, Secretary of the West Virginia Department of Tourism. “We’re really looking at how we build these beginner trails and how we bring these kids, and people of all ages, into the sport,” she says.

To broaden the state’s appeal to a greater variety of cyclists, many parks are building interconnected trail networks that include many beginner and intermediate level trails, he says. Flow-style paths are built by full-time trail builders using new, narrow and nimble construction equipment.

It can get expensive, says Mark Hoyle, mountain bike trails coordinator for the Cacapon Resort State Park Foundation. The Rock and Roll Trail, for example, cost $ 60,000, plus 1,200 hours of volunteer work.

“Parks are quickly seeing a return on their investment,” says Hoyle. “Every weekend I see five to 25 vehicles parked in Cacapon with bike racks, and the new lodge has been occupied by bikers.”

(Find out why rafting is thriving in West Virginia coal country.)

While most cross-country ski trails are cross-country ski-style, ski resorts with warm-weather mountain biking programs are also following the trend. On the southeast side of the state, Snowshoe Mountain recently opened two new downhill trails: an intermediate called “Dirt Beaver” and a beginner-friendly trail called “Whistle Pig”. Both trail names are local terms for “groundhog”.

“I swear to you, we’re not obsessed with groundhogs here,” says Cole Evans, manager of the Snowshoe bike park. “We thought ‘Whistle Pig’ would be a fun, easy-going name that wasn’t intimidating at all.”

Whistle Pig, which opened in August 2021, has quickly become one of the park’s most popular trails, he adds. “I see people taking the trail over and over and then coming back and bringing friends,” Evans says.

As climate change shortens the ski season, parks like Snowshoe are increasingly turning to mountain biking to make up for lost income, says Arbogast. “Pocahontas County, where Snowshoe is located, tries to have equal tourism spending in summer and winter. Right now, they earn two-thirds of their money in the winter, ”he says.

West Virginia’s former coal towns also have a lot to gain in attracting mountain biking enthusiasts, Arbogast adds. “These abandoned mining lands have the perfect topography for mountain biking.”

A popular new flow trail on the west side of the state, at Mountwood Park, directly passes through the abandoned mining town of Volcano. The Pumphouse Trail, which opened in October 2018, slaloms around old wooden oil barrels and stone foundations dating from the 1860s.

“I like to call it a roller coaster through history,” says Chris Swarr, president of Mountwood Park.

Sustainable, eco-friendly, and a lot of fun, the Pumphouse Trail and similar trails are triumphs of modern engineering, adds Swarr. They use local materials, channel water to prevent erosion and become more stable with use. It’s a stark contrast to the unsustainable old school trails, which often follow fall lines and turn into gushing streams during torrential rains. Poorly designed trails also tend to get steeper over time, leading cyclists to take alternate paths and stomp on flora.

“We’re in the midst of a real renaissance in trail building,” he says.

Seeds of change

Zach Adams walks the Rock and Roll Trail on September 25, hours after it officially opened. He brushes aside some brush to reveal a stream of water gushing out from the side of the path.

“West Virginia: wild, wonderful and wet,” he says.

Adams, founder of the Appalachian Dirt trail building company, channeled runoff under the trail by building a French drain, a trench filled with rocks and topped with flatter rocks. All of the material used to build the trail was found at or near the trail site, Adams says. “I’m sort of rearranging the furniture here,” he says.

(This new West Virginia National Park is a hiker’s and climber’s paradise.)

Indeed, the Rock and Roll Trail almost seems to have arisen naturally from the landscape as it winds through lush undergrowth and ancient oak trees. To protect the trees near the trail, Adams carefully dug their roots by hand.

Another key sustainable practice, he says, is to avoid mixing soil types. In Cacapon, this meant separating the nutrient-rich topsoil from the sandy, orange soil below. He then used the orange ground to ‘pave’ the trail and build the bumps and berms that make it so fun to ride.

“The mineral-rich soil compacts and becomes harder over time,” says Adams. “The more you ride on it, the better.”

Once Adams was finished, the volunteers completed the trail by spreading the reserved topsoil over land that had been disturbed by the construction process. The seeds hidden in the ground quickly sprang to life and filled the undergrowth with mountain blueberries and other small plants, making it seem like the path had been there for decades.

Volunteering to build and maintain trails is a major part of mountain biking culture, and Hoyle hopes it will continue even as professionals like Adams take on the trail design. Visitors are always welcome to have fun, he adds.

“In tough times, it really feels good to get together and do something for the community,” Hoyle says.



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New mountain bike trail and visitor center opened in East Zion National Park https://walkonmountain.com/new-mountain-bike-trail-and-visitor-center-opened-in-east-zion-national-park/ Mon, 25 Oct 2021 16:52:08 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/new-mountain-bike-trail-and-visitor-center-opened-in-east-zion-national-park/ SPRINGDALE, Utah (ABC4) – Bikers heading to Zion National Park can look forward to a new mountain bike trail. The new trail will be located on the east side of Zion National Park, beyond the park boundaries. The new development is part of the Zion East Initiative, a company focused on creating a ‘sustainable, conservation-based […]]]>

SPRINGDALE, Utah (ABC4) – Bikers heading to Zion National Park can look forward to a new mountain bike trail.

The new trail will be located on the east side of Zion National Park, beyond the park boundaries. The new development is part of the Zion East Initiative, a company focused on creating a ‘sustainable, conservation-based gateway anchored in providing visitor experiences and services, nurturing our next generation of stewards. of public lands ”.

The new trail will also be accompanied by the opening of an official service center of the national park, an electric shuttle center for electric vehicles, a regional transport center connecting guests and visitors to towns and sites. neighbors.

A groundbreaking ceremony will be held Wednesday at the intersection of State Route 9 and North Fork Road in Kane County. The event will also launch a fundraising event to develop Phase II ‘of an additional 24.5 miles of mountain bike trails and 40 miles of new hiking trails.

“The Zion East Initiative and protecting the landscape through conservation easements is a key priority for Zion National Park,” officials said. “The project aligns with the overall long-term management plan for the park and helps mitigate the impacts of overcrowding in the main Zion Canyon by extending the visitor experience beyond the park boundaries.

Earlier this year in September, a $ 10.8 million grant was awarded to build the “Zion Corridor Trail,” a 12-foot-wide, 18-mile-long asphalt trail from LaVerkin Confluence Park to Springdale.

Officials say the route aims to reduce traffic and congestion along the SR-9 by providing an alternative and safe form of travel and sightseeing. The completed trail will connect visitors to Zion, St. George and Springdale.


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