Hiking – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 21:41:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://walkonmountain.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/favicon-5-120x120.png Hiking – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ 32 32 Review: Hike along the Sea of ​​Galilee https://walkonmountain.com/review-hike-along-the-sea-of-galilee/ Tue, 17 May 2022 20:43:28 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/review-hike-along-the-sea-of-galilee/ We took a bus from the end of our third day on the Jesus Trail to Tiberius, an all-Jewish city on the shores of the Sea of ​​Galilee with a population of 44,000, making it the most big city on the small sea (really just a lake). It was named after Roman Emperor Tiberius who […]]]>

We took a bus from the end of our third day on the Jesus Trail to Tiberius, an all-Jewish city on the shores of the Sea of ​​Galilee with a population of 44,000, making it the most big city on the small sea (really just a lake). It was named after Roman Emperor Tiberius who succeeded Caesar Augustus in AD 14, just as Christianity was beginning to flourish.

Since the Romans destroyed Jerusalem and its temple and persecuted the Jews, you would think the name of the city would be changed. I guess Israelis either have more respect for history or less interest in political correctness.

The bus app that took us to Tiberius was truly amazing. It told you how to walk to the bus stop, which bus to get on and when it would arrive, created your ticket as a QR code, tracked your process to the next stop, told you when to get off and how to walk to the next bus stop and then plotted your way to your destination, in our case a rather drab hotel right on the main street of the Sea of ​​Galilee.

On my to-do list is to compare the Israeli bus system with its amazing app with the JTRAN system when trying to navigate around Jackson by bus.

The Sea of ​​Galilee is the lowest freshwater lake in the world at 700 feet below sea level. The Jordan enters in the north and exits in the south. It is 13 miles long and 8 miles wide. The water is quite clear.

The main pedestrian street along the bank was fairly quiet the evening we arrived. It was Passover Saturday night and most families were celebrating their religious holiday at home. We sat by the water in a beer garden and enjoyed a delicious whole native tilapia, locally called ‘St. Peter’s fish.

The next morning was Easter and Jeff Weill and I woke up before dawn to see the sun rise over the Sea of ​​Galilee on Easter morning. No one was up or out. Israelis are not morning people. They get up late, eat late and go to bed late.

Watching the Easter sun rise over the Sea of ​​Galilee, where Jesus recruited his fisher disciples, was something spiritual. To actually be where it all happened gave me some physical concretization to it all that was a missing piece of my spiritual puzzle.

The sun rose above the cliffs across the Sea of ​​Galilee, the very cliffs from which huge herds of pigs jumped into the sea after Jesus cast out the demons of the local people .

After sunrise we found a small Presbyterian church right by the water. Only 12 people attended the Easter service, but those 12 represented five of the world’s six continents (all but Australia.) What a great testimony to the power of the Holy Spirit that a humble carpenter’s message had spread through the world years later. And we were where it all started.

That day we walked along the northwest border of Lake Galilee. The 2,000 foot elevation drop and a mini heat wave turned into the mid 90’s.

We were soon dying of thirst and sweating like pigs. The Jesus Trail was used by local tourists as a four wheel trail. Groups of smiling and waving four-wheeled tourists sped past, each time covering us with a new layer of dust and dirt. The Jesus Trail is not a big deal in this land of Jews and Muslims. As Christians, we were tourist attractions.

We walked through groves of almond trees, orange orchards and huge banana plantations. We got lost several times, ran out of water, and had to rely on Google Maps to find a gas station where the air conditioning and drink coolers quenched our huge thirst. I downed two bottles of orange juice and two bottles of water in about two minutes.

More hikes and a bus took us to the top of the Mount of Beatitudes where Jesus delivered his Sermon on the Mount. The beautiful monastery closed just as we arrived, so we decided to get off the trail and head down the side of the 2,000 foot hill on our own. Jeff was afraid that a nun would come flying towards us on a four-wheeler for trespassing. I was appalled to find an illegal dump. It was the steepest descent of our hike and the view of the Sea of ​​Galilee was stunning at sunset.

We found a path here and a path there and returned to the Tabgha shore, where Jesus performed the miracle of the multiplication of the loaves and fishes. Four thousand hungry people had come to hear Jesus and he fed them with only five loaves and two fish.

There is a beautiful monastery there with quiet prayer areas right by the water. The gardens were huge and beautiful. It was a very spiritual moment and I prayed for a long time.

That night Tiberius was skipping. Thousands of Israelis had come out along the lake’s main pedestrian street to celebrate Passover. The family unit seems very intact in Jewish culture. Almost everyone was part of a large family and they wore their Jewish Passover celebration clothes. Very interesting.

Our seedy hotel has come alive with families and extended families. The hotel had a huge kitchen where you could cook your own meals. Families had come to Tiberius for the holidays and they were saving money by cooking in the hotel kitchens. It looked like a huge do-it-yourself dining room.

The next morning we took a bus to the Jordan River where it empties into the Sea of ​​Galilee. We passed the large tourist baptism site, impressed by hundreds of huge stone tablets, each with John the Baptist’s Bible passage engraved in a hundred different languages.

After that, we arrived at Jordan River Public Water Park, designed around a Native American theme, complete with totem poles. We consider the Jordan River a holy place, but for Israelis it’s a great place to have a big family picnic, swim, and rent an Indian-themed canoe. The place was crowded.

We stripped down to our bathing suits. Although it was still morning, it was warm enough to take full advantage of the clear, cool water. Beautiful cypresses hung over the banks and their roots created great underwater swimming steps. Young people were swinging from ropes and jumping into the river. Laughter abounded. I dived as deep as I could, swimming underwater with my eyes closed. It was special. It was spiritual.

Jeff wanted to take a bus along the eastern shore of the Sea of ​​Galilee before heading to Jerusalem. All along the shores of the Sea of ​​Galilee, people were heeling. It was a great Passover feast.

We got off at Ein Gev and walked through a stinking stockyard to an excellent fish restaurant whose specialty was, of course, John Dory fish. On the way back to the bus, the path was lined with huge beautiful flowers, ancient artifacts like a 2000 year old wine press, and small shops and stalls.

We pulled out our bus app, walked to the nearest bus stop, and were soon on our way to Jerusalem, one of the oldest cities in the world.

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The Tubatse club enjoys the benefits of hiking https://walkonmountain.com/the-tubatse-club-enjoys-the-benefits-of-hiking/ Sun, 15 May 2022 09:50:13 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/the-tubatse-club-enjoys-the-benefits-of-hiking/ BURGERSFORT – Many locals enjoy hiking as a platform to stay in shape without paying a penny. The Tubatse Hiking Club invited locals to join them in exploring the beauty of the local communities. The club were founded during lockdown in October 2021, but 2022 has seen them grow by leaps and bounds.This year the […]]]>

BURGERSFORT – Many locals enjoy hiking as a platform to stay in shape without paying a penny.

The Tubatse Hiking Club invited locals to join them in exploring the beauty of the local communities.

The club were founded during lockdown in October 2021, but 2022 has seen them grow by leaps and bounds.
This year the club organized trips to GaRiba, Mohlaletsi, Penge, Mafefe and Mac Mac pools.

Further trips are planned this year.

The last trip was to Mafefe on May 1. “It was interesting as we hosted other clubs such as Mphahlama Hiking Club and many more from Limpopo and Mpumalanga. We walked more than 10 kilometers, visiting and exploring nature. The day ended with a braai,” said one of the club’s founders, Dr Phil
Mthombothi.

He said their next visit will be to Zongororo in Mpumalanga. “We have a partnership with the Mphahlama hiking club and together with them we can make the hike better.”

Mthombothi and his co-founder, Mmabatho Matladi, shared the physical benefits of hiking.

“It helps with weight loss, reduces stress and improves mental well-being. Hiking is good for the heart and wonderful for cardiovascular health. Matladi added: “We want this club to be known. Our area has so many mountains that we plan to explore.

The Tubatse Trekking Club plans to organize treks every month. Interested residents can contact Mthombothi on 082 836 1026.

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Hike Bob: The Saga of a Lost Trail, Catamount Falls Trail Opens | Food & Culture https://walkonmountain.com/hike-bob-the-saga-of-a-lost-trail-catamount-falls-trail-opens-food-culture/ Fri, 13 May 2022 17:10:22 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/hike-bob-the-saga-of-a-lost-trail-catamount-falls-trail-opens-food-culture/ An epic view along Trail 756 Bob Falcon When I meet people for the first time and they ask me what am i doing, i tell them i get paid to hike. I go on a hike, then I write a column about it. And I really like looking for a new trail, or a […]]]>






An epic view along Trail 756



When I meet people for the first time and they ask me what am i doing, i tell them i get paid to hike. I go on a hike, then I write a column about it. And I really like looking for a new trail, or a little-known, little-known trail to share. Last year I tried to find one that I, and in fact many others, saw on a map or walked past but never discovered.

Forest Service Trail #756 climbs the narrow Limbaugh Canyon just west of Mount Herman near Monument. According to various maps and the state’s COTREX app, it branches off from FS Trail 715 just over a mile from Mt. Herman Road. Trail 715 is a popular trail with cyclists and hikers, beginning near the Forest Service Monument Fire Center, crossing Mt. Herman Road, and continuing until it ends on the south side of Chautauqua Mountain. I’ve hiked the 715 many times and although I was aware of the 756 on the maps, I had never seen the trail. Last year I walked the 715 several times with the specific goal of finding the 756. I was always able to verify that I was in the location indicated on the maps, but there was no sign of the path. I headed for where I thought the trail would be, creating GPS tracks that looked like they were made by a drunken spider – but to no avail.

After these attempts I contacted the US Forest Service Pikes Peak Ranger District and told them I couldn’t find the trail – either the maps were wrong or time and nature had erased it.

Enter Tom Mowle of the Colorado Mountain Club‘s Pikes Peak group. As he recounts, he was talking with Pikes Peak Ranger District staff about another trail and was asked if he knew anything about the 756, due to my report. Although Mowle had never heard of the trail, he did some research and realized he had been on the west end of it in the past. He consulted a book published in 2000 by Zoltan Malocsay, a hiking and trail legend in the Pikes Peak area, and at that time Malocsay noted that he couldn’t find that trail either. I have Malocsay 1980 Pikes Peak Area Trails Hiking Guideand this track is not mentioned at all in the book.







rock formation

One of the many stunning rock formations on trail 756



Long – and interesting – story shortened, Mowle was able to find the trail by approaching it from the west, instead of the east like I did. He found that the 1.5 miles to the east were mostly overgrown or strewn with dead trees and were almost invisible. Last fall, Mowle and other CMC members returned to the trail, cutting off part of the dead fall and pruning vegetation that obscured the path. Mowle says the track needs a lot more work, though.

I went back to the track a few days ago approaching 715 again. If it wasn’t for some flags where 756 meets 715 you still wouldn’t be able to find it, but the intersection is pretty much exactly where the maps published and COTREX says it should be. In short, the views on the trail are breathtaking, with huge rock formations on both sides of the narrow canyon that Monument Creek runs through. I hiked several miles about 0.4 miles past a point where the trail descends next to the creek and a massive beaver dam that backed it up. Due to the late hour, I wasn’t able to go all the way to the end of the trail and back, but Mowle tells me I’ve seen his most scenic part. It’s unclear what will happen next, but Mowle hopes the Forest Service will approve a stewardship project for CMC.







Hammer of Thors

It’s hard to tell from this image, but this rock formation is several stories high. I call it “Thor’s Hammer”.



Things you need to know: Although trail 715 is easy to navigate and moderately difficult, trail 756, especially the first 1.5 miles or so west of 715, is very difficult. Much of it is deep soft dirt on a steep slope. The trail is narrow and can be difficult to follow (look for the markings). In some places, you will have to climb steep slopes, often on soft ground, or go over or under large rocks. The narrow trail, along with the steep side incline, will give your knees and ankles a hard time as you will rarely walk on flat, level ground. If these are your weak points, you might want to follow this trail, at least until it gets further improvements. My hike was just under 6 miles round trip.







Trail 715-756

GPS track of my hike. The trailhead is at the lower right corner of this trail.



To succeed: From exit 161 on I-25, head west on the freeway. 105 and continue west on Second Street through town until it ends at Mitchell Avenue. Turn left, then turn right onto Mt Herman Road. Take Mt. Herman Road 8.1 miles to the trailhead on the right. The 715 trailhead is about 1000 feet past the Mount Herman trailhead. Mt. Herman Road turns into dirt at Red Rocks Road and it can be very washable. Yet it is passable by all but the lowest vehicles. Take your time or you’ll loosen some bolts on your car or your bladder.


The very popular Catamount Falls Trail in the town of Green Mountain Falls, which had been closed since last August due to a real estate dispute, is now set to reopen. When attempts to find a solution to the encroachment failed, the Green Mountain Falls Historical Foundation stepped in and purchased the property, allowing the trail to reopen in “early spring 2022”. This is a great example of a public-private partnership to preserve a historic hiking trail. You can read the details in the press release below.

Press release regarding the reopening of the Catamount Falls Trail



The El Paso County Parks Department is in the process of updating its system-wide blueprint and is seeking feedback during its public comment period. You can read the draft 2022 Master Plan and submit your comments on the EPC Park Plan website. This is your chance to influence the direction of the county park system.


Be wise. Do good things. Leave no traces.

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Best Kern County Hiking Trails https://walkonmountain.com/best-kern-county-hiking-trails/ Tue, 10 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/best-kern-county-hiking-trails/ BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KGET) – Bakersfield isn’t exactly known for its beautiful scenery or abundant nature. On the contrary, it is called the arid land between the big cities. Although Bakersfield doesn’t have the Pacific Northwest forests found in Oregon or Vancouver, there’s still plenty of nature to see at home. Keep reading for the best […]]]>

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KGET) – Bakersfield isn’t exactly known for its beautiful scenery or abundant nature. On the contrary, it is called the arid land between the big cities.

Although Bakersfield doesn’t have the Pacific Northwest forests found in Oregon or Vancouver, there’s still plenty of nature to see at home.

Keep reading for the best running, biking, and walking trails in Kern County.

Bakersfield Cliffs

Overlooking the oilfields synonymous with Kern County, the Bluffs offer a scenic drive surrounded by nature and wildlife. A moderately difficult trail, according to AllTrails, the 3.2-mile hike typically takes an hour and 15 minutes. It is an ideal place to walk, run or cycle. You can even bring your dog for his daily exercise.

“It’s a perfect combination of peace and not being too crowded. I really like it,” wrote AllTrails user Eric Minkes.

Hart Park

If you’re looking for something a little longer, Hart Park is a great option. The 6.5 mile hike takes about three hours and offers an array of trails to follow. It is recommended for those wishing to hike, mountain bike or travel the trails in a motorized vehicle. Dogs are also welcome here but must be kept on a leash at all times.

“Excellent hiking or climbing workout with amazing scenic views from any vantage point. A gem of Kern County outdoor activities,” Joel Lopez wrote on AllTrails.

Kern River Boardwalk Trail

This trail allows you to explore Bakersfield in its entirety. It stretches for 30 miles along the River Kern from Lake Ming Road to Enos Lane on State Route 43. Technically a bike path, it is still open to those looking to walk or run it. The trail will take you from rural parts of town to more urban locations. It’s a great place to spot wildlife like birds, roadrunners, coyotes, hawks, and rabbits.

“Each side has its own type of beauty. The trail is mostly paved and very well maintained. I really like that there is no room on the trail for cars to cross so you don’t have to stop for traffic,” one user wrote on TrailLink.

Wind Wolves Reserve

The largest non-profit nature preserve on the West Coast, you can hike multiple trails across the 93,000 acres. Spring is the perfect time to see all the colorful flowers, such as mullet ears, poppies, lupine, gold fields and blue-eyed grass, blooming on the Wildflower Loop Trail, according to the Visit website. California.

Those hoping to encounter wildlife in their natural habitat will want to hike the True Elk Trail or Reflection Pond. The True Elk Trail is about a mile long and will take you to the reserve’s herd of over 200 Elk. The Reflection Pond Trail is longer at three miles and will lead hikers to a watering hole for wildlife, which includes kit foxes, bobcats, coyotes, deer, and even the occasional black bear.

“Wind Wolves Preserve is one of Kern County’s best kept secrets!! It’s a fun place to exercise and see some of Mother Nature’s beauty at the same time. Plenty of hiking trails for everyone ranging from easy to moderate,” wrote one Tripadvisor user.

Mount Pinos

This is a day trail that takes about seven and a half hours, according to AllTrails. The trail is described as an out and back trail that is 16.1 miles near Frazier Park. It is moderately difficult and popular among hikers, backpackers, and campers. The 3,000 foot elevation makes it the perfect way to escape the heat and enjoy cooler temperatures.

“Love this trail, it’s so quiet and usually pretty green. At the beginning of the year, it generally keeps a little snow on the sides of the mountains. Great hike for beginners and dogs. My husband and I needed a little more challenge so we kept walking to the next peak of the mountain. So if you’re looking for more, there’s definitely plenty of room for that,” Alejandra Durand wrote on AllTrails.

TMTA Lehigh Trail Loop

Rated moderate, this 17-mile loop trail takes about four and a half hours, according to AllTrails. Admission to the trail is $5 or $35 for an annual membership. The fee goes towards annual insurance, general trail construction and other operating costs, according to its website. Be warned of gusty winds and wildlife like cattle and snakes.

The trails are excellent with several options for hiking. The wind was a bit gusty, but manageable,” Matthew Kabel wrote on AllTrails.

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Weird things you get used to while hiking https://walkonmountain.com/weird-things-you-get-used-to-while-hiking/ Sat, 07 May 2022 19:06:10 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/weird-things-you-get-used-to-while-hiking/ So much has happened since my last message that it would take too long to recap them. Instead, please enjoy these snippets of the track on things that initially felt weird and now feel perfectly natural. Drink water from streams Between towns, our only sources of water are springs, streams and lakes. We use a […]]]>

So much has happened since my last message that it would take too long to recap them. Instead, please enjoy these snippets of the track on things that initially felt weird and now feel perfectly natural.

Drink water from streams

Between towns, our only sources of water are springs, streams and lakes. We use a water filter to ensure it is safe to drink. There is nothing so fresh and cold as drinking water from a mountain stream or river.

Sleep neck and neck with strangers

Along the AT there are 3-sided wooden structures with sleeping platforms that can accommodate 6-12 people. When rain is forecast, shelters are coveted and often fill up quickly. Sleeping between brand new trail buddies, at least two of whom snore, is becoming commonplace.

poo in the woods

You don’t always camp at shelter sites, and not all shelter sites have toilets. You often end up taking care of bodily functions behind a tree (digging what’s called a “cat hole” first) being careful not to drop your drawers in plain sight of other hikers or campers.

Go to sleep at sunset

Sometimes the conversation around the campfire or picnic table continues after dark, but after 8 or more hours of hiking most of us climb into our sleeping bags shortly after dark. twilight – aka “midnight hiker”.

Recovery of objects in a “hiker’s box”

Hostels and other places that welcome backpackers have boxes, shelves or cupboards where people can throw unwanted items. We picked up oatmeal, trail mix, clothing, pita bread, coffee packets, powdered milk, ziplock bags, fuel cans and bagels, among other things. What one hiker rejects, another hiker covets.

always be hungry

You are in a constant state of calorie deficit after hours of hiking in the mountains, day after day. Constant hunger becomes the norm, as does eating big meals every time you’re in town.

Some things you never get used to

See a breathtaking 360 degree view from one of Tennessee’s bald spots.

The thrill of crossing a state line or reaching a milestone mile.

Instantly befriend another hiker, be sad when they’re not seen again, then greet them like a long-lost relative when they reappear on your path.

Crisscross a hill and see mountains and valleys in the distance.

Share a story that only another hiker will understand.

Crying because the hike is so hard, but getting up every morning, lacing up your boots and going another 12 miles. Because you’re a hiker and that’s what we do.

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How the hike progresses with great strides https://walkonmountain.com/how-the-hike-progresses-with-great-strides/ Fri, 06 May 2022 02:16:19 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/how-the-hike-progresses-with-great-strides/ Bhagirathi Karki runs a small restaurant near Shivapuri National Park. She is pleasantly surprised by the increase in traffic to her shop lately. “I’m earning in two weeks what I was earning about a month earlier,” Karki said. “Since the pandemic subsided and restrictions were lifted, my business has picked up.” His new clients are […]]]>

Bhagirathi Karki runs a small restaurant near Shivapuri National Park. She is pleasantly surprised by the increase in traffic to her shop lately.

“I’m earning in two weeks what I was earning about a month earlier,” Karki said. “Since the pandemic subsided and restrictions were lifted, my business has picked up.”

His new clients are those who come for morning hikes in the national park.

Shivapuri National Park, located in the northern part of Kathmandu, has recently become a popular hiking destination for Kathmandu residents.

As pandemic-induced restrictions saw public places, including gyms, closed, those trying to stay in shape found solace on the trails around the Kathmandu Valley. Hiking became a new fad not only for fitness enthusiasts, but also for those looking for time in peace or those who wanted to spend time with friends and families outdoors.

Antim Rokaya and Preeti Kafle, both in their mid-20s, say the city’s hubbub, claustrophobic crowding and need for fresh air drove them to hike.

“I find hiking a better way to spend our free time,” Kafle said. “There’s no escaping the Kathmandu cityscape except when you’re on a trail.”

Over the past two years, popular hiking trails – Shivapuri National Park, Amitabha Monastery, Kakani, Phulchowki, Nagarkot, Sundarijal, Champadevi and Chisapani, among others – in and around the valley have seen an increase in frequentation of hikers. in nature.

Most Covid restrictions have now been lifted, but the threat of another wave of the pandemic lingers in the air, with various states in neighboring India reporting a fresh spike in cases.

“In such a scenario, it would be unwise to resume physical contact with people. It’s uncomfortable,” Rokaya said. “So the only other option to be in the open is to hike.”

Kathmandu, the capital and the most populous city in the country, offers the best amenities, whether cinemas, pubs, bars or gymnasiums, apart from schools and colleges. But the city is one of the most polluted in the world, with experts repeatedly warning against jogging in the urban area in the morning.

Experts say the air quality around the green-covered paths is much better than in the urban area.

Archana Shrestha, a schoolteacher and regular hiker, says she used to hike in the Shivapuri National Park area and along the Sundarijal Trail earlier too. But she became a regular hiker after the pandemic.

Shivapuri National Park covers an area of ​​118 square kilometers and over the years has become a major hiking destination for locals and tourists.

“I go hiking to get away from the noise of the city. Hiking is an escape for me,” the 24-year-old said. “Two years ago, I didn’t pass a single person on the Shivapuri hiking trail, but these days I come across dozens.”

According to data from Shivapuri National Park, nearly 2,000 tourists visit the park during weekends. “Most of them come hiking. The number of hikers has increased in recent years,” said Manjit Bista, a park ranger.

Activity of medium difficulty, the hike progresses to such an extent that almost everyone seems to climb the small paths of the Valley.

Romkanta Pokhrel, in her late 40s, says she has hiked almost all the hiking trails in and around the Kathmandu Valley.

“Since the pandemic, several people around me have approached me with questions about the hiking trails,” Pokhrel, a doctoral student and teacher, told the Post. “Hiking is good physical activity, but it’s also good for the mind. Hiking brings us closer to nature.

Nepal has always been famous for its trekking activities. Thousands of tourists visit the country every year for mountain treks, the most popular being Annapurna Base Camp. These mountain hikes, however, last for weeks and require good preparation.

But the hike is all about walking small trails for a few hours, hikers say.

According to Prakash KC, fitness trainer and nutrition consultant, hiking is good for your health in many ways, especially for people who don’t want to lift heavy weights or don’t like indoor workouts.

“Walking for a few hours boosts endurance and conditions muscles,” KC said.

Doctors, however, say that although hiking can have its own health benefits, there are certain aspects that need to be considered before undertaking the activity and that people should not just hike the trails because everyone the fact.

According to Dr. Rakesh Shrestha, a physiotherapist at Annapurna Neuro Hospital, people with health conditions should consult their doctor before hiking.

“Since it’s all about walking the trails, some might suffer from altitude sickness or have difficulty breathing,” Shrestha said. “If a person has no health problems and the body can adapt quickly to the new environment, one can go there because it can bring huge health benefits.”

He said he has come across incidents of people collapsing while hiking. “There are pros and cons in everything,” he added.

Although the health aspect, as suggested by the doctors, is a problem with the hike, the increase in traffic around the valley trails has created another problem.

Pokhrel, the avid hiker, says on his recent hike on the Amitabh Monastery Trail, northwest of Swayambhu, he was shocked to see the rubbish strewn around the trail.

Shivapuri National Park officials also say that with the increase in hikers, the trails are littered with plastic bottles and food wrappers.

“Although we have very strict rules on waste disposal inside the park with penalties in place for irresponsible hikers, we still come across plastic bottles, wrappers, masks and litter of paper littering inside the park,” said Bista, the park ranger.

Laxman Poudel, the park’s conservation officer, said irresponsible garbage disposal inside the national park also puts wildlife at risk.

“A few months ago, I found beer bottles, tin cans, cigarette butts and plastic waste in the national park. If animals in the conservation area consume such waste, it could be fatal to them,” Poudel said.

“Most of the hikers who come here are young people and they usually come in groups. They carry their own food and snacks, and while they should take their trash with them, most don’t.

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Benalla hikers get back to hiking – part one. https://walkonmountain.com/benalla-hikers-get-back-to-hiking-part-one/ Wed, 04 May 2022 02:03:29 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/benalla-hikers-get-back-to-hiking-part-one/ Back to their roots: The Benalla Bushwalkers have ditched canoes and bikes and been on some scenic hikes in recent weeks. Photo by contribution For the past few weeks, Benalla Bushwalkers have been walking, rather than boating and biking, as noted in a previous post. The club organized two night hikes in the High Country […]]]>

Back to their roots: The Benalla Bushwalkers have ditched canoes and bikes and been on some scenic hikes in recent weeks. Photo by contribution

For the past few weeks, Benalla Bushwalkers have been walking, rather than boating and biking, as noted in a previous post.

The club organized two night hikes in the High Country as well as a weekend camp in Mitta Mitta, the latter being particularly successful, with 10 participants enjoying the nearby trails and the hospitality of the local pub.

At the end of March, Helen Spinks took a group on what was to be a three-day trek to three of the High Country’s huts and included a section of the iconic Australian Alps walking track, which winds from Walhalla to Tharwa in the ACT, covering 650 km.

But as Ms Spinks said, sometimes the best-laid plans can fall apart.

“We left our vehicles at Rocky Valley Dam on Tuesday and in the beautiful afternoon sun we drove to Johnston Hut,” Ms Spinks said.

“We did an overnight camp with backpackers from Sydney and a bunch of crimson rosellas bustling gumballs above our tents.

“The next day we continued to Roper Hut, meeting two school groups and a couple walking the Alps Track. Our mountain trails are certainly popular.

“Then, as can happen quite quickly in the mountains, the rain and wind came overnight, the wind really roaring through the trees.

“The next morning the plan was to hike to Edmonson Hut which is on a side trail on the way back to Rocky Valley Dam.

“But with the rain now horizontal, we voted and decided to go back to the vehicles, even though we were all toasty warm in our rain gear.

“The rule of thumb when walking in alpine areas is to always wear quality rain gear; the weather can change so quickly.

“Back to the cars, we elected to go to Falls Creek for hot showers and lunch, then home.

“So although the rain shortened our walk, it was still a great few days in the mountains with good company, backpack and views.”

Keep an eye on www.benallaensign.com.au for part two.

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Will anyone dare to use Kurdistan’s first long-distance hiking trail? » Explorersweb https://walkonmountain.com/will-anyone-dare-to-use-kurdistans-first-long-distance-hiking-trail-explorersweb/ Mon, 02 May 2022 15:50:14 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/will-anyone-dare-to-use-kurdistans-first-long-distance-hiking-trail-explorersweb/ Before we dive into this new hiking trail, let’s explain where Kurdistan is and the issues facing this ambitious project. If the modern history of the Middle East had broken apart differently, Kurdistan could exist as a country. Instead, around 30-45 million Kurds live in a mountainous strip of Asia spanning Turkey, Syria, Iraq and […]]]>

Before we dive into this new hiking trail, let’s explain where Kurdistan is and the issues facing this ambitious project.

If the modern history of the Middle East had broken apart differently, Kurdistan could exist as a country. Instead, around 30-45 million Kurds live in a mountainous strip of Asia spanning Turkey, Syria, Iraq and Iran. It was only in Iraqi Kurdistan that the Kurds gained their autonomy.

The Kurdish population is divided between Turkey, Syria, Iraq and Iran. Photo: The Kurdish Project

There, the struggle for some level of independence took the better part of a century. It culminated in the 2005 Iraqi constitution, which officially recognized the region as autonomous. Iraqi Kurdistan has even become a tourist attraction. It was safe (at least compared to most of Iraq), stable and beautiful.

But the tourist years were short-lived. The collapse of Syria and the rise of ISIL led to renewed fighting. The Kurds found themselves on the front line. The region remains volatile.

The Mount Zagros Trail

The return of tourists may seem unlikely, but Iraqi Kurdistan has lost none of its appeal for more adventurous travellers. A new 240 km hiking trail might be the thing that keeps them coming back. Lawin Mohammad, a Syrian refugee, and Leon McCarron, an Irish writer and presenter, put the road together. They connect fragments of village paths, shepherd’s paths and old mountain passes.

“We don’t ‘build’ trails that don’t already exist. No one owns it; nobody builds it,” McCarron told The New York Times.

A section of the trail in Iraqi Kurdistan. Photo: Leon McCarron

Mohammad and McCarron are an odd couple. Mohammad had never hiked, and McCarron had little knowledge of the politics and dangers of the area. But the partnership worked.

The Zagros Mountain Trail isn’t finished yet, but it’s taking shape. The duo hike the trail repeatedly, refining each segment and establishing a network of contacts in villages and towns. There are plans for a system similar to The Jordan Trail. Opened in 2016, the 675km Jordan Trail is run by an association that provides maps, maintains the path and can facilitate connections between tourists and local guides.

The trail isn’t finished yet, but hikers will soon attempt the first full hike. Photo: Leon McCarron

Martyred deminers

Mohammad and McCarron envision a similar organization in Iraqi Kurdistan, but there will be additional complexities. Iraq is heavily mined, most dating from the reign of Saddam Hussein and the Iran-Iraq War. During the war, Iraqi mines were so plentiful, and Iran’s mine clearance capabilities so weak, that the Iranian military used young men on foot or on motorbikes as “martyr minesweepers”.

Despite recent and less gruesome clearance efforts, straying from a well-worn track could prove fatal. Another big risk is airstrikes by the Turkish army targeting members of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), which they designate as a terrorist organization. Obviously independent hiking is extremely unsafe and a good guide will be essential.

These threats have shaped the course of the trail and could prove its downfall if the region slides back into conflict. However, for now, with the track half finished, the project looks brilliant.

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South Waikato: Hike and Bike in the Most Underrated Area of ​​the North Island https://walkonmountain.com/south-waikato-hike-and-bike-in-the-most-underrated-area-of-the-north-island/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/south-waikato-hike-and-bike-in-the-most-underrated-area-of-the-north-island/ The glowing maggots put on a good show. Floating between the narrow walls of the bush-covered canyon, our paddles resting on our knees as the current carried us through the growing darkness, we were suddenly surrounded by pinholes of brilliant white light to match the starry sky above. we. Provided Kayaking in a hidden cave […]]]>

The glowing maggots put on a good show.

Floating between the narrow walls of the bush-covered canyon, our paddles resting on our knees as the current carried us through the growing darkness, we were suddenly surrounded by pinholes of brilliant white light to match the starry sky above. we.

Kayaking in a hidden cave of glowworms.

Provided

Kayaking in a hidden cave of glowworms.

Nothing disturbed the peace and quiet except the gentle trickle of unseen mini waterfalls. Even the talkative kids in the group seemed to have been silenced.

I had arrived at the Riverside Adventures base on the shores of lower Lake Karāpiro that afternoon, not quite sure what to think of my next adventure. The evening kayak trip to a hidden glowworm canyon seemed magical, but I wondered if the old body would be up to it. The only real workout my arm muscles get these days is lifting cans from the kitchen cupboard, and I’m weirdly intolerant of the cold – my fingers bleed and go numb when my body temperature drops too low ( thank you for nothing Raynaud’s syndrome).

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Floating downstream through a galaxy of glowworms is a totally immersive experience.

Provided

Floating downstream through a galaxy of glowworms is a totally immersive experience.

Fortunately, the team is prepared for delicate customers like me. Our group of eight were given waterproof pants, splash jackets, gloves and beanies before heading out – there were even thermals available for those not already wearing theirs.

I didn’t need to worry about the microscopic muscles in my arms either – our guide Caleb stopped frequently to fill us in on the history of the area. We were paddling, he told us, above the submerged village of Horahora, flooded in 1947 when the Karāpiro hydroelectric dam was completed. My kayak, he said, was placed directly above the ruins of a three-story power plant – a popular dive site today despite the eels which Caleb said were about as thick as her thighs.

Turning into the Pokaiwhenua stream, it was easy to imagine we were traveling back in the days when the local iwi posted bodies along the river to ward off would-be invaders. Walls covered in creepers closed in on us and overhanging trees partially obscured the blushing sky as we made our way to a clearing to stock up on pineapple chunks and wait for the darkness to descend completely.

The upcoming light show, Caleb informed us, was courtesy of the larvae (maggots) of a fly known as the fungus gnat. Or more specifically their bioluminescent poo. Luckily, learning that — and that maggots eat their siblings to shine energy — didn’t detract from their beauty. Coming back through the canyon was a bit like what an astronaut has to do when floating in space – exhilarating and utterly fascinating.

Based at the historic Okoroire Hot Springs Hotel, just outside Tīrau, I had started my mini-stay south of Waikato with a hike to the top of the highest waterfall in the North Island. As a travel writer I’m ashamed to say I hadn’t heard of Wairere Falls until I Googled walks in the area and the three hour return hike did the subject of rave reviews.

The 45-minute trail to the lookout follows a swift stream through a fairy forest of tree trunks and moss-covered rocks, passing a series of impressive waterfalls before climbing steeply to the top of the falls. .

Standing at the top of Wairere Falls, you can't help but feel like you're living life on the edge.

Lorna Thornber / Stuff

Standing at the top of Wairere Falls, you can’t help but feel like you’re living life on the edge.

The second half of the trail is a natural Thighmaster – my muscles still ache after three days – but the view from the top was well worth my clumsy new step. Standing beside – or if you’re brave – a natural infinity pool overlooking thick bushes and emerald fields, you can’t help but feel like you’re living life on the edge. And lunch at the edge of white water gushing from a 153-meter escarpment is a real rush.

The next morning, I drove to the Riverside Adventures base to tackle a section of the Waikato River Trails, which pass through farmland, native bush, pine forest, and a series of hydroelectric dams on more 100 km from Ātiamuri to Lake Karāpiro.

With lots of ups, downs, and tight turns, it’s a more adventurous option than the nearby Hauraki Rail Trail, but there’s plenty to satisfy easy riders like me—the five sections range from easy to expert. With shuttles available to transport you to the section of your choice and quality coffees along the way, they make for a great day – or days – out.

With sections ranging from easy to expert, the Waikato River trails cater to cyclists of all skill levels.

Provided

With sections ranging from easy to expert, the Waikato River trails cater to cyclists of all skill levels.

I like a good bike ride, but I hadn’t ridden in about a year, so I rode the scenic but hilly section from Jones Landing to Arapuni before taking my e-bike for the rest of the Karāpiro section easy to intermediate 15 km. After rediscovering my inner speed demon on the downhill sections amid fragrant pine trees, I took a break at the 152-meter-long Arapuni Suspension Bridge with its dizzying views of the dam and raging river below before returning at the base.

I would have stopped to refuel at the popular Rhubarb Cafe had it been open, but, as it was, I relied on Em’s provided chocolate peanut bar to propel me along for a walk. through wetlands, gravel trails with views of Sanctuary Mountain Maungatautari, and riparian reserves that are temporarily home to what must surely have been very happy campers.

No first-time trip to South Waikato is complete without a visit to the Blue Spring near Pūtāruru – and it’s well worth the long journey. It’s a 15-minute walk to the source from the Leslie Road entrance, but the 4.7km Te Waihou walkway from the Whites Road car park traces a river that’s at least as stunning as the star attraction, would be is that because it goes on and on.

The swirling blues and greens of the Te Waihou River seem like they belong in the canvas of an Impressionist painter.

Lorna Thornber / Stuff

The swirling blues and greens of the Te Waihou River seem like they belong in the canvas of an Impressionist painter.

I envied the ducks gliding through water so clear and blue it seemed almost too pure to exist on this planet, but it’s a good thing that humans are forbidden to swim in it – the spring provides about 70% bottled water from New Zealand. Flowing over underwater plants, the swirling blues and greens of the river look like something Monet might have painted – and the colors become more vivid as you get closer to the source, whose clarity reflects its optical purity absorbing red light.

If there’s one thing that goes as well with cheese as it does with wine, it’s outdoor exercise, so treat yourself to a visit to the nearby Over The Moon Dairy when you’re done. Collector of international awards, the dairy turns milk from local cows, goats and buffaloes into all manner of creamy delights – from black truffle infused brie to earthy blue. It’s a high-calorie work that explores the many natural wonders of the Waikato. You deserved it.

Essential:

Getting there and staying there: A good base for exploring the region, the Okoroire Hot Springs Hotel is about two hours’ drive from Auckland. Double rooms start at around $170 a night and include use of the private natural hot springs. See okohotel.co.nz.

Play it: Riverside Adventures offers bike, kayak, and custom tours along the Waikato River and beyond. A three-hour guided bike tour along the Karāpiro section of the Waikato River Trails costs $99 with your own bike and from $129 if you rent one. The four-hour glowworm kayak tour costs from $125. See riversideadventures.co.nz. Over The Moon Dairy offers free tastings of its gourmet cheeses from its Pūtāruru base. See overthemoondairy.co.nz.

Stay safe: New Zealand is currently under Covid-19 restrictions. Follow the instructions on covid19.govt.nz.

The writer traveled courtesy of South Waikato District Council.

Water from the Mamaku plateau takes between 50 and 100 years to reach the blue source.

Lorna Thornber / Stuff

Water from the Mamaku plateau takes between 50 and 100 years to reach the blue source.

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Roger Federer discusses his love for hiking with Anne Hathaway, sings on Britney Spears’ “Oops…I did it again” https://walkonmountain.com/roger-federer-discusses-his-love-for-hiking-with-anne-hathaway-sings-on-britney-spears-oops-i-did-it-again/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 08:12:07 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/roger-federer-discusses-his-love-for-hiking-with-anne-hathaway-sings-on-britney-spears-oops-i-did-it-again/ Roger Federer and Anne Hathaway recently starred together in a commercial for Swiss Tourism that went viral on social media. The 20-time Grand Slam champion is a brand ambassador for his country’s tourism industry, and the ad with Hathaway was the latest in a series of high-profile campaigns he has been involved in since 2021. […]]]>

Roger Federer and Anne Hathaway recently starred together in a commercial for Swiss Tourism that went viral on social media. The 20-time Grand Slam champion is a brand ambassador for his country’s tourism industry, and the ad with Hathaway was the latest in a series of high-profile campaigns he has been involved in since 2021.

On Wednesday, the former world number 1 took to Instagram to share a special behind-the-scenes video from the set. Hathaway and Federer asked each other a series of informal questions in the clip, particularly around their respective experiences with roadtrips.

The Swiss maestro revealed that he had always been someone who loved to travel, a sentiment that dates back to his love of hiking as a child. The world No. 41 noted that he often used to go camping in the Swiss mountains with his parents, which mainly resulted from his father’s belief that it would help him spend more time with his children. .

“I loved hiking. It’s a childhood memory that I lived very well. Very early on, I was young and I learned to make a fire, grill sausages and bring food. bread… I loved it. And the summer in the mountains is great.” Federer said. “You can forget everything. My dad used to say, ‘When you walk, you talk.’ I think that gave him a lot of time to be with his kids and talk to them. I loved that.”

When it was her turn to post a question to Anne Hathaway, the 40-year-old asked her which three celebrities she’d like to roadtrip with. The actress cast comedian Sarah Silverman and singers Adele and Dolly Parton.

“I think of Adele. She can both talk to me and sing. She’s so lovely,” Hathaway said. “Next, Sarah Silverman and Dolly Parton.”

All about road trips with Anne Hathaway and Roger Federer 😉🎤🇨🇭🚗 We learned a lot about Roger Federer and Anne Hathaway during this conference. Especially since both of them love to sing during road trips in Switzerland. 🎞 youtu.be/9nNLOqp_H4s https://t.co/kh117Bqce2

Unfortunately, the Swiss didn’t know who Parton was. After Hathaway did his best to explain who the legend was, Federer jokingly begged her not to ask him any more questions as he felt embarrassed by her lack of pop culture knowledge.

“Don’t ask me any more questions, please,” joked the Swiss. “Why am I sweating.”

The American dropped the 20-time Grand Slam champion with one final question, asking him what kind of music he listens to while on a road trip. The former world No. 1 revealed he loved having Queen, Bon Jovi, a Swedish pop rock band called Roxette and the Backstreet Boys in the background, as well as some Britney Spears.

“I sing in the car when I travel, but badly. I like to listen to Queen, Bon Jovi, Roxette – a Swedish band,” Federer said. “Backstreet boys, because why not? I think it’s right there. A bit of Britney Spears [too]I remember teaching my children.”

That’s when Hathway asked Federer to show him his singing skills, which the 40-year-old surprisingly complied with. Although the performance didn’t last long, with the former World No. 1 singing just one word from Spear’s hit single “Oops…I did it again”, it was enough to send the actress into an elated frenzy. .

“You’re the most fun! You did it! Oh my god! I can’t believe you did it!” Hathway noted in amazement.

Roger Federer confirmed to play Swiss Indoors 2022

Roger Federer has been confirmed to take part in the Swiss Indoors 2022
Roger Federer has been confirmed to take part in the Swiss Indoors 2022

Roger Federer has been confirmed to take part in the Swiss Indoors 2022 in October. The ATP 500 event is the second tournament the 20-time Grand Slam champion is guaranteed to play in this year, following the Laver Cup in September.

The former world No. 1 is a 10-time tournament winner, having won the tournament between 2006-08, 2010-11, 2014-15 and 2017-2019. The world No. 41 will be the triple title holder this year and will approach the event with a protected ranking.


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