Hiking – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 05:06:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://walkonmountain.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/favicon-5-120x120.png Hiking – Walk On Mountain http://walkonmountain.com/ 32 32 Meshi hiking in the mountains! Our guide takes us to the top of Izugatake for an unforgettable lunch【Photos】 https://walkonmountain.com/meshi-hiking-in-the-mountains-our-guide-takes-us-to-the-top-of-izugatake-for-an-unforgettable-lunch%e3%80%90photos%e3%80%91/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 05:06:49 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/meshi-hiking-in-the-mountains-our-guide-takes-us-to-the-top-of-izugatake-for-an-unforgettable-lunch%e3%80%90photos%e3%80%91/ Chains, stoves and coffee in the mountains of Hanno. With SoraNews24’s headquarters located in Tokyo’s downtown Shinjuku district, our Japanese-speaking reporter Come on Hatori spends most of his days in a highly urban environment. Recently, however, he felt the urge to go for a hike in the mountains. In fact, the hiking part is really […]]]>

Chains, stoves and coffee in the mountains of Hanno.

With SoraNews24’s headquarters located in Tokyo’s downtown Shinjuku district, our Japanese-speaking reporter Come on Hatori spends most of his days in a highly urban environment. Recently, however, he felt the urge to go for a hike in the mountains.

In fact, the hiking part is really just a connected activity for what Go really wants to do: lunch in the mountains. And not a store bought bento that got lukewarm on the hike. Go’s reverie these days is to enjoy mountain meshi, a hot, freshly prepared meal on top of a mountainas you see on camping TV shows and anime series.

Unfortunately, Go doesn’t know much about hiking, and while he worked in a restaurant, his background is in the indoor kitchen with a full kitchen. So for the kind of mountain meal he craved, Go was going to need help, and that’s where Yuka Between.

▼ Hi Yuka!

Yuka is an old friend of Go who works as a personal trainer. About three years ago she started to really hike, and now she goes to the top of a mountain at least once a week, if not more. After Go told her what he wanted to do, she happily agreed to be his guide and even gave him a clothing/equipment checklist:
● Backpack
● Long pants (to keep insects away from your legs)
Hiking shoes
● Hat
● Wrist watch
● Non-slip gloves
● Rain gear (parka or waterproof poncho)
● Headband light (in case it gets dark on the trails)
● Garbage bags
● Wet wipes
● Dressings
● Water (always assume that there will be no place to buy it on the trail)
● Cash (rural stores and public transport are less likely to accept credit cards or e-money cards)
● Mobile battery if your phone is not fully charged
● A sheet of plastic to sit on if you don’t want your pants to get dusty/muddy

As for kitchen equipment, Yuka’s list is:
● Bowl
● Aluminum plate
● Portable cooker
● Solid cooking fuel
● Kitchen utensils (fork, spoon, chopsticks)
● Seasoning case
● Cooking grid
● Lighter
● Hot sandwich press
● Ziploc bags

All of this she was able to buy for 100 yen from the Daiso store, except for her Coleman brand sandwich press and a second Mont-Bell stove.

For the hike, Go and Yuka were heading to the top of Mount Izugatake in Hanno, Saitama Prefecture.. Go got up early and jumped on the train to Shomaru Station on the Seibu Chichibu Line, about an hour and 15 minutes north of downtown Tokyo, where he met Yuka.

From the station they started climbing along the road until they came to this cone which marks the official start of the trail.

Once they got off the paved road, it was only a matter of moments until they were surrounded by the dense forest.

Go felt lost almost immediately, but luckily he had Yuka’s experienced eyes and hiker’s knowledge to fall back on.

“See those trees with the pink ribbon on them?” says Yuka, who has already taken this course. “You can spot this, or trees marked with paint, at places on this trail where it’s easy to get lost, and they’ll show you the way.”

Pathfinding turned out not to be a problem, since Go could just follow Yuka. “It’s better if you can keep a steady pace from start to finish” she explained, slowing her steps enough not to leave Go behind. “Oh, and you want to use your glutes when you go up,” Yuka advised, rather than putting all the stress on your knees or ankles.

In places, the path was crisscrossed by a stream, with fallen logs serving as makeshift bridges.

The first part of the hike was shaded by the canopy of trees, but as time went on they were rewarded with this great view.

This is the top of Mount Kodakayama, at an altitude of 720 meters (2,362). If you recall, however, Go and Yuka’s destination was the summit of Mount Izugatake, the path continues until 131 meters from here. And when we say…

…we mean UP.

Although the route from the top of Kodakayama to the top of Izugatake is not completely vertical, there is a part where you pull yourself up using chains driven into the rock on the mountainside.

This type of setup isn’t hugely unusual in Japan, but it’s still a pretty dramatic example of what a hiking course is (as opposed to a mountain climbing course). It’s both a challenging workout and a fun adventure, and as Go stopped at the top of a section, he couldn’t help but feel a sense of accomplishment..

Only one more section of chain to go…

and they were at the top of Izugatake, 851 meters above sea level!

Now was the time to do what they had come here to do: cook and eat lunch..

Once again, Yuka’s experience was on full display as she quickly set up the kitchen equipment. The key to mountain cooking, she told Go, is to do as much prep work as possible at home. Anything that needs to be measured, chopped or peeled is much easier to do in your kitchen than outdoors, like with Yuka’s pre-measured rice bags to cook.

With his bowl and portable stove, Yuka got the rice in in no time. It even had a metal partition to prevent the flame from being blown away by sudden gusts of wind.

While the rice cooked, she used her second stove to prepare side dishes, such as a casserole of chestnut meatballs, sweet potatoes and mochi simmered in amazake (a sweet sake without alcohol).

▼ Just what is needed for an autumn aperitif.

The sandwich press was used with a mixture of meat and vegetables inspired by the banh mi.

And with the rice now ready, Yuka added some Meat and vegetables simmered nikomi style which were leftovers from his dinner the night before.

Everything was delicious and Go reveled in the rustic luxury of eating a delicious hot meal so far from civilization. As a finishing touch, Yuka even made them fresh coffee to sip in the crisp mountain air..

We should mention that Yuka also gave Go some mountain dining manners tips.. Leaving any kind of trash or leftovers behind is an absolute no-no, which is why her gear checklist includes trash bags: she and Go were going to take all of their trash with them. This also applies to coffee. She only does what she knows she and her companions are going to drink and refuses to throw any into the bushes.

Happy and full, Go and Yuka relaxed and digested for a while, but before long it was time to pack up and head back down. The mountain trails darken even before sunset, as she always plans to get back to the bottom around three or so (the headband lights on her checklist are a backup precaution).

The descent obviously took less time than the ascent, and they were back at the trailhead about four hours after starting their ascent. “Haha, hey, if you got up too early, you could probably even walk to the top of a mountain and be back down in time to go to work on a weekday, right?” Come on joked, to which Yuka replied:

“Yeah, sure, I do sometimes.”

Go isn’t sure he’s hardcore enough for a mountaintop pre-work breakfast just yet, but he’d certainly be happy to do another weekend lunch.

Photos ©SoraNews24
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[ Read in Japanese ]

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The Belchertown Trail adds a sensory aspect to the hike https://walkonmountain.com/the-belchertown-trail-adds-a-sensory-aspect-to-the-hike/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 17:39:18 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/the-belchertown-trail-adds-a-sensory-aspect-to-the-hike/ BELCHERTOWN — The area along Lake Wallace, long called the “swamp behind the police station,” has gained new ground with the opening of the city’s newest trails. Nestled along the skate park and wetlands at the edge of the old Belchertown State School, now known as Carriage Grove, is the Lake Wallace Sensory Trail. The […]]]>

BELCHERTOWN — The area along Lake Wallace, long called the “swamp behind the police station,” has gained new ground with the opening of the city’s newest trails.

Nestled along the skate park and wetlands at the edge of the old Belchertown State School, now known as Carriage Grove, is the Lake Wallace Sensory Trail.

The trail, a multi-phase community project that spanned five years, began with a celebratory event on August 29 with more than 50 people in attendance. The trail is the start of what is expected to become Belchertown’s city-wide heritage trail system.

“We had 50 to 60 people there. It was a very good turnout and everyone seemed to have enjoyed themselves and duly impressed,” said planner Doug Albertson. “There has been an overwhelmingly positive reaction.”

Construction of the half-mile portion of the trail began in June 2021. The cost of this first phase of the project, which includes Community Preservation Act funds and local fundraising efforts, exceeded $200,000. $.

Initially, the proposal included the development of a basic walking trail near the lake and the old public school, but with community input and involvement like that of Vicky Martins-Auffrey of Team Jessica, who helped bring Jessica’s Boundless Playground to life in her honor. daughter, the project has evolved to make the trail accessible to all ages and abilities.

Albertson and Curatorial Administrator Erica Larner worked with project manager Andrew Kilduff and design partner MJ Halberstadt, both of New York-based design, development and consulting firm Terra Genesis International, to complete this track.

“As a community, we are thrilled to provide another accessible recreational opportunity for our roster,” said Board Chair Jen Turner. “This beautiful trail has opened up access to underutilized space and made it welcoming for our residents and visitors to enjoy the natural beauty of the area, as well as providing educational opportunities.”

Recognize lives lived

The design was born out of an effort to both celebrate Lake Wallace and recognize the significance of its location on the site of the former Belchertown State School, according to Louise Levy, the public schools liaison for Belchertown with the Wallace Lake Sensory Trail.

“One of the hopes for the trail is that it changes people’s perception, not only of the Lake Wallace area, but also of the possibilities for public school redevelopment,” Levy said, “and that possibility of build a new positive narrative to the city around the space to acknowledge the lives that have been lived here.

During a recent tour of the new trail, Levy, who teaches science at Belchertown High School, detailed the flora and fauna species and features that make the trail so accessible.

The path of the trail is wide and has a gently sloping course to allow those using wheelchairs or walkers to cross the course safely, she said.

Along the path are tactile markings, intended to guide blind or visually impaired people safely from one place to another. Among these markings is a coiled cable mounted on poles along the length of the trail with buttons indicating an upcoming sign with information.

“There are also these blocks, which are the steps of some of the buildings (of the public school) that were demolished, along the way. And so wherever these blocks are, a visually impaired person will feel it,” she said, “And that’s an indication that something on the track is changing.”

The trail is also equipped with panels combining images, writing and Braille to alert users of upcoming observation areas.

For more than a decade, Levy has taken his students on field trips around Lake Wallace. She said having the trail in place with specific viewing stations specifically geared towards landscape features provides a sort of learning laboratory.

“I mean, it’s like, absolutely transformative,” she said while standing on an observation deck. “It really shows how fabulous this lake is.”

Levy also helped write the language on the learning station signs.

“This landscape was formed when a huge chunk of ice broke off from a retreating glacier about 16,000 years ago,” she said. “As the ice slowly melted and meltwater flowed around it, the unique depression of the lake and surrounding area formed.”

In October, Levy will teach an earth science unit where students will learn how to read a map, draw a map, and land use practices. Students will also be asked to come up with a creative proposal for the ongoing redevelopment of the public school. Once the ideas are collected, Levy said, she will bring them to the planning board.

Although there has already been damage to some of the signs and the removal of touch marks as well as vandalism on the bridges, members of the city and the project team are trying to repair the damage. To report an area that needs maintenance, the Friends of the Lake Wallace Sensory Trail group encourages people to fill out a form at lwsensorytrail.org/maintenance-report.

In the fall, designs for Phases 2 and 3 of the project, which extend the current trail, will be finalized, according to Albertson.

Phase 2 includes the creation of a large loop around Foley Field with a viewing platform overlooking the lake and a bridge to the hiking trails, and Phase 3 is an extension that connects Foley Field to a point of departure. lookout overlooking the Mount Holyoke range.

Emily Thurlow can be contacted at ethurlow@gazettenet.com.

]]> ‘Hiking saved my life’: Tucson Trekker reflects on his hiking trip https://walkonmountain.com/hiking-saved-my-life-tucson-trekker-reflects-on-his-hiking-trip/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 22:07:23 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/hiking-saved-my-life-tucson-trekker-reflects-on-his-hiking-trip/ “Hiking…saved my life,” said Kelly Thrush from Tucson. The liver transplant recipient says 16 years of poor lifestyle choices, including a junk food diet and alcohol abuse, were factors in his near-fatal health crisis and ultimate wake-up call. Though grateful for his second chance, Thrush struggled with shame and found renewed purpose. “I struggled with […]]]>

Hiking…saved my life,” said Kelly Thrush from Tucson. The liver transplant recipient says 16 years of poor lifestyle choices, including a junk food diet and alcohol abuse, were factors in his near-fatal health crisis and ultimate wake-up call.

Though grateful for his second chance, Thrush struggled with shame and found renewed purpose. “I struggled with a lot of different ideas and questions… Why was I able to live that day? Someone’s child died the same day I woke up. There’s a mother over there who lost her baby, but my mother was sitting there holding my hand. I’m still having trouble with this question. I had put everyone I loved through hell.

Determined to live a better life, Thrush embraced hiking in the mountains around Tucson as a way to improve his physical and mental health. “The pull of the mountains is strong,” he says. “It only took me one hike to want to go back.”

Recently, he climbed the popular Tumamoc Hill Trail near Tucson 10 times in one day, but set himself even bigger goals: to give back through outdoor-focused volunteerism. “Trek for Teens is an amazing fundraiser with the goal of getting Arizona’s youth out in the wild,” Thrush says of the Prescott-based The Launch Pad Teen Center project. “All the money we raise goes to helping Prescott teens get out and have amazing adventures in nature.

“Every year on the first weekend of October, we go on a Rim-to-Rim trek in the Grand Canyon. The goal is to let teenagers experience just how amazing the wilderness is. To see it from visu, and not only from a screen.

Thrush plans to continue to pay it forward by supporting others facing life’s challenges.

“The world is a pretty amazing place. Gratitude. Joy. Humility. Push yourself beyond the limits you didn’t know you had, and you’ll find places you never knew existed.

IF YOU ARE GOING TO
Tumamoc Hill
tumamoc.arizona.edu/tumamoc-hill/walk-hill

Hiking for teenagers
give.thelaunchpadteencenter.org/fundraiser/3811401

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Returning to the hike allows time to see the sites https://walkonmountain.com/returning-to-the-hike-allows-time-to-see-the-sites/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 20:30:57 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/returning-to-the-hike-allows-time-to-see-the-sites/ I didn’t realize how much I missed walking in the woods until we got back to hiking after a summer break. The blistering heat we’ve had over the past month has kept us well off the hiking trails and on our bikes, where the breeze from our speed and ability to slide (vs. the constant […]]]>

I didn’t realize how much I missed walking in the woods until we got back to hiking after a summer break. The blistering heat we’ve had over the past month has kept us well off the hiking trails and on our bikes, where the breeze from our speed and ability to slide (vs. the constant motion of walking) has left us moderately chilled .

The downside of cycling is that at higher speeds you miss some of the little details that make the woods so beautiful – mushrooms and wildflowers, caterpillars and moths, even animal droppings that tell a story about who lives in the woods and travels some of the same trails as you.

Our return to hiking was not without problems. We started in the High Peaks area after a night of camping. Didn’t tell our 12 year old that I was hoping to climb a high peak, one of 46 mountains in the Adirondacks with a peak over 4,000 feet. My husband, Herb, thought it was a really bad idea, but I thought a little obfuscation was worth it. (It wasn’t my greatest parenting moment.) I wasn’t lying, I reasoned, but I wasn’t telling the whole truth either. Yes, it’s a mountain, I tell the child. No, it’s not very long.

“It’s only seven miles round trip,” I said encouragingly. But our child is not dope and quickly understood the right question to ask: “Is it a High Peak?”

When informed of the whole plan – to climb Wright Peak from the Adirondak Loj trailhead – the child flatly refused to go. We decided to hike to Avalanche Pass instead. It’s not a high peak, but it’s in the High Peaks region, and took us past the beautiful meadow at the site of the old Marcy Dam and along Marcy Brook, two of my favorites .

We hiked about a mile past the mars dam when the kid started complaining of sore feet. A quick glance showed one of the dangers of infrequent hiking: blisters. I pulled out the first aid kit and played doctor mom. It helped, but we quickly turned around as Herb continued towards the lake.

Once we turned around, the kid became positively chipper and bounced around the track. I was sorry to have turned back, but having abandoned a destination, we had the freedom to lollygag. We had stopped at the creek above the old dam on the way for a snack, enjoying the view of the peaks surrounding the now drained pond. On the way back we stopped under the old dam, under the bridge that takes hikers across Marcy Brook. As people walked above, their boots pounding the wooden bridge, we chatted about school and friends and admired the insects skating above the water. On the surface, their legs were slender, but the way the light refracted off the water made their shadows on the creek bed large and round.

The next day we found more broken sneakers and forced a hike to Rocky Falls, a small waterfall on Indian Pass Brook. It’s only two miles from the Loj trailhead, but by the child’s dramatic limp, you’d think he was 20. We pretended not to notice it and the limp quickly subsided .

The rock falls aren’t very high, but they are very Adirondacky – cold water rushing over large gray slabs of rock, with an inviting deep pool at the base. It wasn’t warm enough to swim, but we lay on a small beach, admiring the variety of colors of the pebbles that lined the pool, choosing our favorites to line up on top of a rock. They looked better in the water, though; once dry, the vividness of their colors faded.

The sun and temperatures said late summer, but we found the first signs of fall: a few bright red maple leaves scattered on the ground. Wildflowers, too, told us what season it was. Gentians grew in the shade along Indian Pass Creek, and in the open areas there were goldenrods and jagged asters.

On our hike to Marcy Dam the day before, we had seen dozens of hikers. By comparison, on the Indian Pass trail, we only saw two groups of hikers all morning. As mine had been the day before, it seemed like most people’s attention was focused on the peaks. I was happy (in the end) to slow down and admire the details instead.

gvscott.gvs@gmail.com

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15 Tips for Hiking Taggart Lake in Grand Teton National Park https://walkonmountain.com/15-tips-for-hiking-taggart-lake-in-grand-teton-national-park/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 15:58:11 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/15-tips-for-hiking-taggart-lake-in-grand-teton-national-park/ Like all of our national parks, Grand Teton National Park is a treasure. In 1950, it must have been sheer wisdom that combined the 1929 Grand Teton National Park with the 1943 Jackson Hole National Monument to form what we now call Grand Teton National Park. The Taggart Lake trail is popular, to say the […]]]>

Like all of our national parks, Grand Teton National Park is a treasure. In 1950, it must have been sheer wisdom that combined the 1929 Grand Teton National Park with the 1943 Jackson Hole National Monument to form what we now call Grand Teton National Park.

The Taggart Lake trail is popular, to say the least. There are many ways to do it, but we did the 3 mile “out and back” with phenomenal views of the Teton Range. The average 6% incline is very doable, but the hiking trail includes rocks, roots, and steps.

Pro tip: Purchase a national park pass in advance to save time at the front gate.

Note: During our visit, the high altitude smoke from the west coast wildfires added a haze to the sky, which is why the mountains in the photos are not as crisp and clear as they would otherwise be. Always so beautiful !

Here are some tips to help you get the most out of a Taggart Lake hike.

1. Follow the good advice of the gypsy guide

Before you go, purchase and download the Yellowstone/Grand Teton “Gypsy Guide” app for a nominal fee. As you drive, it uses GPS to trigger audio about the park’s history, attractions, and more, based on exactly where you are in the park. Your own private guide! The Gypsy Guide told us this hike was a “must-do”. This app is great for all your time in Grand Teton National Park.

Pro tip: You can also download the free NPS app, which provides maps, tours, and on-site accessibility information for over 400 national parks.

Elk Bull in the meadow along Teton Park Road

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

2. Watch for wildlife

Before we even got to the trailhead, we were on the lookout for wildlife, which is always a good idea in Grand Teton National Park. Our reward for being early risers that day was seeing a bull elk in a meadow on Teton Park Road. We spotted it in the same area we had seen pronghorns the day before. This is a popular section of road for wildlife!

3. Go early

We were in the park several days before doing this hike, so we passed the Taggart Lake trail several times. From mid-morning until the end of the day, the parking lot was full and cars were parked all over the place and halfway down the road. So start early (we were there at 7:45) to avoid the crowds.

Pro tip: In September we had a cool start in the 30’s but it warmed up to 80 degrees. Dressing in layers is always a good decision.

4. Be prepared

Be aware of national park advice for hiking in Grand Teton National Park, as it “can be a challenging experience due to the rugged nature of the landscape, including high elevation, steep trails, and extreme weather changes and sudden”.

Rest easy, the hike to Taggart is rated “easy”. Still, hiking basics like good shoes, hiking poles if you need them, and plenty of water are a good idea. We loaded up our backpacks with trail mix and grabbed our bear spray (another essential) and off we went.

As we were just getting started, we saw a mule deer. He was easily identifiable because of his large mule-like ears. Apparently not a fan of hikers, he quickly ditched in the woods upon seeing us coming.

Aspens begin to turn in September

Aspens begin to turn in September

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

5. Soak up the initial views of Aspen

The views on the hiking trail as you leave the trailhead are not mountainous as expected. The hike begins in an aspen covered moraine before the trail widens out for views of the Tetons. The trees were starting to turn orange and gold and Grand Teton had more fall color than we had seen the previous week in Yellowstone.

Taggart Creek Crossing

Taggart Creek Crossing

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

6. See the clear waters of Taggart Creek

At every wooden bridge over every creek crossing we could look into the water and see all the way to the bottom. The water may not have been drinkable, but it was crystal clear. At this time, hardly anyone was on the trail. Private Hike!

Giant boulders near Lake Taggart

Giant boulders along the way

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

7. Take a seat among the giant boulders

We walked past the giant – and I mean giant – rocks. Dean and I were dwarfed by this huge boulder that was to the right of the hiking trail, and others like it. It was probably exactly where he had been sitting for many, many years.

8. Enjoy other wonders of the forest

During our hike we saw other oddities like a snag (dead tree) with so many deep holes it looked like the work of a woodpecker in overdrive. We saw another tree with large gashes on the bark and places where the bark was completely stripped from the tree. Hmm…we were in black bear and grizzly bear country. What could make such a mark? Even with bear spray, I didn’t want to think about it too much.

Bradley Lake, Grand Teton National Park

A moment of reflection at Bradley Lake

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

9. Take the offshoot at Bradley Lake

Are you feeling ambitious? At the split in the marked trail, follow the Valley Trail to the right and head towards Lake Bradley. Note that the Valley Trail is rated “moderate”. Moderate and worth it! I say, any morning you can hike to two alpine lakes is a good morning.

We were captivated in Bradley by the beautiful reflection of the mountains in the water. We haven’t seen a soul! Who are we to have our own private lake, mountains and trees?

Bradley Lake, Grand Teton National Park

Bradley Lake Bridge

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

The bridge at Bradley’s end crossed the narrower end of the lake. I couldn’t help but notice how many old trees in this section of the park have fascinating, thick, gnarled roots.

Pro tip: If you take the Bradley offshoot, the park’s website estimates hiking time at 2-3 hours. Without Bradley, the Taggart hike is estimated to be 1-2 hours.

We loved our detour here, but it was time to continue hiking. From Bradley Lake, we followed the well marked Valley Trail signs to Taggart Lake.

Reflections of Taggart Lake, Grand Teton National Park

Reflections of Taggart Lake, Grand Teton National Park

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

10. Linger over the views of Lake Taggart

Taggart is popular for a reason. Everywhere I looked, mountains were reflected in this great still lake. Violets and greens and mauve colors. Evergreens and big rocks with this clear water. Even with the smoke from the forest fires clouding the mountains, it was a beautiful sight.

A fisherman tries his luck on Lake Taggart

A fisherman tries his luck on Lake Taggart

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

11. Try your hand at fishing

Anglers were lined up on an outcrop of rocks near the water, trying their luck fishing in Taggart Lake. I don’t know what they were fishing, but the Teton lakes are home to some 16 species of fish, including brook trout, lake trout, cutthroat trout, and whitefish.

The Long View of Lake Taggart

The Long View of Lake Taggart

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

12. Take the long view from the wooden bridge

Before leaving this heavenly place, walk to the long wooden bridge on the south side of the lake. It gives you a long perspective of the lake that you can’t fully appreciate from other vantage points.

13. Hiking has its own rewards

As we were walking back to the car, we passed a family hiking towards Lake Taggart. I turned around to take a photo of this family sharing such a dramatic nature with their children. At one point during a hike, we spoke to a father and mother, each walking with a small child in baby carriers on their backs. I applauded their efforts (knowing that traveling with young children is an effort) and told them, and the father easily replied, “I have to start them early.” I liked it.

Pro tip: The hike to Taggart is beautiful and there are many other trails to choose from. When you go, stop at a visitor center and talk to a ranger, who can suggest additional hikes and give you updated trail conditions.

14. Pack a picnic to enjoy after the hike

More than once, Dean and I enjoyed sandwiches, grapes, fries, and water from our little cooler at the end of a hike. Simple foods taste best when eaten with the majestic Grand Tetons as a backdrop.

Picturesque scene in the Grand Tetons

Picturesque scene in the Grand Tetons

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

15. Take a photo stop on Teton Park Road

As we headed up Teton Park Road, we saw a quaint, now familiar little brown stable set against the mountains. We had been driven by this scene before, but this time horses were roaming the meadow. I also loved the old suede rail fences in the foreground, so unique to the area and becoming a thing of the past. The mountains were a bit smoky which made them feel a little surreal and to me that just added to the wonder of the scene.

One last look at beautiful Lake Taggart

One last look at beautiful Lake Taggart

Photo credit: Joan Sherman

Final Thoughts

With over 250 miles of trails, I would say Grand Teton National Park makes the most of its mountainous landscape. There’s something for everyone, from short walks like this 3-mile Taggart beauty to true backcountry experiences. Lots of options for getting up, out and in.

The short, easy hike to Taggart Lake is quintessential Grand Teton, and it offers everything a person hikes in the mountains to experience: natural beauty, solitude, and a glorious place to refresh your soul.

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Hike the Grande Traversée des Préalpes https://walkonmountain.com/hike-the-grande-traversee-des-prealpes/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 13:19:34 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/hike-the-grande-traversee-des-prealpes/ The Grande Traversée des Préalpes is a 161 km trail from Sisteron to Entrevaux in France.As the name suggests, it’s not quite the Alps yet but it’s still quite hilly.The area also has a pre-Provençal feel to it, which is really cool.And there should be quite a few cool towns and villages on the way, […]]]>

The Grande Traversée des Préalpes is a 161 km trail from Sisteron to Entrevaux in France.
As the name suggests, it’s not quite the Alps yet but it’s still quite hilly.
The area also has a pre-Provençal feel to it, which is really cool.
And there should be quite a few cool towns and villages on the way, including Sisteron, the northern terminus.
It is not a traditional GR, but a GRP (GR de Pays), which generally represents local, shorter paths, often making a loop. This one doesn’t.
Instead of the famous red and white lines for the markers, these are red and yellow.

Day 1

After a pretty intense month of August hiking, I ended up taking a longer than planned break and staying home for a week.
I went to the cinema, I saw friends, I found new material, rest, and beer and cheese in me.
I’m definitely ready to get back on track.

Although it looks like the weather is going to be horrible all over the country for the next week.
After a week off trail, I decide to go anyway, but obviously avoiding the high mountain trails.

It’s quite a mission to arrive in Sisteron.
I feel too lazy to hitchhike and it might rain, so I decide to take buses and trains even though it takes much longer.
The thing is, I was kind of sold a ticket to a bus that doesn’t exist.
We were 8 people waiting for this bus when another bus driver told us that this line was not working and hadn’t been working for 7 months!
But it is always announced everywhere and on the monitors.
They even had an announcement for the bus in the station!
Anyway, after getting really mad at a hopeless lady from the train/bus company, I realized they didn’t care and I had to hitch a ride.
Fortunately for me, the first car stops and takes me to Sisteron.

The city has a spectacular location, with a strange giant rock on one side and the citadel on the other.

I visit the citadel before refueling and finally getting back on the track quite late.
But just in time for time to collapse!
After an hour thunderstorms are everywhere, the rain gets heavy and even though I’m not high on a ridge, it’s still quite intense.

But the rain subsides after a while and checking the forecast in my tent for tomorrow, surprise they say sunshine instead of the rain and thunderstorms I’m supposed to have for a week.
I’m crossing my fingers that doesn’t change.

Day 2

It is indeed a sunny day.
But there is still a lot of mud, and it sticks to my shoes, which makes them really heavy.

Got some nice views hiking on a ridge for a bit, before descending to Thoard.
I have to say that I may not be doing big mountains like I have been doing for 2 months, but the ups and downs are still pretty brutal.
And the terrain is not the easiest.
It’s mostly rocks that roll underfoot, my ankles don’t like that.
But ascending for the last time of the day, I come to a ridge line that offers a fantastic view in the evening light.

I take a 30-minute detour to the top of La Bigue and pitch my tent shortly after.
I’m pretty tired but it was a nice day.
I was hoping to get to Digne tonight, but it’s still 6km away.

Day 3

Finishing the walk on the ridges with the sunrise is a real treat.
After a few hours I arrive at Digne where I refuel.
This will be my last until the end and I get a little carried away with the food.
And of course there’s a climb right after, where I definitely regret buying any extra stuff.

But again, it’s a beautiful day and the scenery is fantastic.
There is definitely a different vibe on this trail, compared to others I’ve hiked in France.
I really like this mix of mountains and Provence.

Although there isn’t a ton of water and for a few hours, I’m not sure I’ll find a source in time for tonight.
Which means I would have to walk to the next village, which would be at least an hour of night hiking.
But luckily I find a river and a campsite nearby.

Day 4

Today, it’s easy where I’m making good progress.
I feel good and it’s pretty flat.

I enter the Verdon region, famous for its gorges.
This trail doesn’t go there, but I hiked it last year on my big hike through France and it ended up being one of my favorite sections.
The gorge is amazing and walking around Lac de Sainte-Croix was definitely a highlight.

I end the day in the village of Méailles, which benefits from an exceptional location.
As I check my GPS to see where I can find water, a local tells me that there is an area behind the town hall that is good for camping, with restrooms and picnic tables. fuck.
It’s just perfect because it’s getting dark and I don’t feel like looking for a campsite with my headlamp.

I don’t know if I will finish tomorrow, but it is possible and it would make my life easier for transportation the next day.

Day 5

Well, I was pretty happy with my progress yesterday, but today is a different story.

As I followed the yellow and red beacons, I found myself in Fugeret, a village that I must not cross.
I was going to blame an insufficient amount of coffee this morning, but I spot a GTPA sign in the village.
I am but the beacons disappear quickly.
I look at my map to find the best way to get back on track and decide to follow a track that should do it.
It’s a very steep climb, only for the trail to disappear into the woods at the bottom of a cliff that seems impossible to climb.
I turn back to try a second track and have better luck this time, although I probably lost a few hours, which means I’m not sure I’ll finish today, which disrupts my transport plans for tomorrow .
But it’s still very beautiful and I cross a very beautiful forest typical of the south of France, with nice rocks on the way.

During a snack break, a shepherd starts chatting with me, which is always nice when you’re hiking solo, but it quickly turns into an inaudible monologue about his life, where he stares ahead of him as if I’m not not here.
Not to mention his two dogs that barked at me for ten minutes, probably some of the weirdest/scariest dogs I’ve seen.
Their eyes basically said, “Yeah, we’re gonna jump down your throat”
I’ve never been afraid of dogs, but this time I am.

After this strange encounter, I see a sign indicating that I am actually much closer to the terminus than I thought.
It’s good news.

I then finish my hike in Entrevaux, a very beautiful bastide overlooking a river.
I check the train schedule for tomorrow, visit the city and get myself a pizza and some wine before pitching my tent by the river.

I really enjoyed this trail and its different vibe to other trails I’ve hiked this summer.
This is definitely a hidden gem, I didn’t see any hikers there, including day hikers!

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Fern Lake is a hiking and fishing delight – Estes Park Trail-Gazette https://walkonmountain.com/fern-lake-is-a-hiking-and-fishing-delight-estes-park-trail-gazette/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 15:06:40 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/fern-lake-is-a-hiking-and-fishing-delight-estes-park-trail-gazette/ A greenback cutthroat trout sits on a rock after being caught. (Dan Poust/Collaborating Photographer.) A bull moose sits on the shore of Fern Lake. (Thomas Poust/collaborating photographer) Burnt trees lie in ruins following the Fern Lake fire. (Matthew Poust/Estes Park Trail-Gazette) Fern Lake. (Matthew Poust/Estes Park Trail-Gazette) Burnt trees fill the stunning view on Fern […]]]>

For those looking to get out for another effective hike in Rocky Mountain National Park before the cold months sweep through the region, Fern Lake Trail is a top pick. Sitting at a 7.5 mile round trip with an elevation gain of 1,476, the trail can be strenuous for some, but is rewarded once the alluring lake nestled in the mountain is reached.

My dad, brother and I did the hike over Labor Day weekend. As fly fishers, we were looking for a footslog that would pay off in fish caught, and talk around town led us to search for Fern Lake.

The trailhead begins at the prairie end of Moraine Park and is easily accessible by a short drive through the Bear Lake Park entrance.

Within a quarter of a mile of our effort, we saw a herd of elk that numbered about 50. They were lying in the shady brushwood of the forest, enjoying the relief of the scorching sun that beat down that day, and with rut season looming, a few sizable bulls were watching the peloton.

The first stopping point on the trail is about a mile and a half away at a landmark known as “The Pool”. The blue-water waterfalls that run through the area are formed by the convergence of the Big Thompson River and Fern Creek, which marks the end of the flat land and the start of the slope.

The part of the trail past The Pool brings with it a graveyard of towering dead trees, blackened and laid bare by the 2012 Fern Lake wildfire. As low-growing pink and yellow shrubs paint the ground the slow rebirth of the landscape, an eerie 3,500-acre hole has been left ravaged for the foreseeable future. Through two miles of switchbacks of rocky trails this burn scar continues until the lake is reached.

The land of devastation we passed through came in handy when we saw the bubbling surface water that seemed to be at a boiling point due to the surging fish. We each picked rocks to stand on and as we put on our rods we were greeted by a group of four moose lounging on the shore of the lake nearly 50 yards away.

With our flies tied and the antler species of brill in front of us, we started casting in the fishy water below us.

My dad’s first cast yielded the coveted species of green-backed cutthroat that inhabit the surrounding lakes of the region: a telltale sign that great Rocky Mountain National Park is being fished. At only 10-12 inches, what these fish lack in size they make up for in color. Shades of green and yellow mottled with dark spots, a scarlet belly and blood red gills, these greenbacks are some of the most vibrant species of trout one can have the pleasure of landing.

Scattered along this species of trout are many Colorado cutthroats and brookies that have their own beauty. By finding luck on the end of each of our lines, we were able to land handfuls of fish, my dad and brother totaling ten against mine, as they are better anglers than me. However, a person’s skill level doesn’t matter much at Fern Lake, as the water is full of hungry mountain trout, making it a surefire option for any angler.

After repeating the capture and release process until our accomplishment, we trudged back down the mountain to our starting point.

Overall the hike took just over four hours and is a top selection for a day trip. Whether you’re looking for a leisurely hike with rewarding views or hoping to grab a few bites on your hook, Fern Lake Trail is a selection to choose from.

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Remains found in heavily wooded hiking area in Lee, Massachusetts identified as missing wife Meghan Marohn https://walkonmountain.com/remains-found-in-heavily-wooded-hiking-area-in-lee-massachusetts-identified-as-missing-wife-meghan-marohn/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 20:14:00 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/remains-found-in-heavily-wooded-hiking-area-in-lee-massachusetts-identified-as-missing-wife-meghan-marohn/ On March 29, 2022, 42-year-old teacher Meghan Marohn was reported missing in Lee, Massachusetts. Almost six months later, the Berkshire District Attorney’s Office announced that Meghan’s remains had been found. Dateline featured Meghan’s case in our Missing in America series in May and spoke with Meghan’s brother, Peter Naple. Peter told Dateline that Meghan works […]]]>

On March 29, 2022, 42-year-old teacher Meghan Marohn was reported missing in Lee, Massachusetts. Almost six months later, the Berkshire District Attorney’s Office announced that Meghan’s remains had been found.

Dateline featured Meghan’s case in our Missing in America series in May and spoke with Meghan’s brother, Peter Naple.

Peter told Dateline that Meghan works at Shaker High School in Latham, New York, and was put on paid leave in March. He said his sister needed a break and decided to take a trip to the Red Lion Inn in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

Meghan arrived at the hostel on March 24 and planned to leave on March 30. Peter told Dateline that he texted Meghan on the night of Saturday March 26 and everything seemed fine, but when he got no response the next day he became concerned.

Peter told Dateline he called the hostel on Monday, March 28, and asked them to check on Meghan. When they entered her room, her bed was made and all her things were still there.

Nearly a month after her disappearance, in April 2022, Massachusetts State Police announced that “Meghan’s black 2017 Subaru Impreza was found parked on Church Street in Longcope Park, a heavily wooded hiking area in South Lee” on Sunday, March 27.

Peter told Dateline that Meghan’s car was unlocked and her hiking boots were found in her car, which he found extremely odd.

At the time, the Massachusetts State Police also said that “an intensive search of this area and other areas of interest in Lee by state troopers, local police and firefighters, as well as that a civilian search and rescue team did not locate Ms. Marohn”.

According to a recent Massachusetts State Police article, since April 2022, the “Lee Police, Lee Fire, Massachusetts State Police Lee Barracks, Massachusetts State Police K9 and Airwing, the The Massachusetts State Police Special Emergency Response Team, the Berkshire County Sheriff’s Office, the Albany County Sheriff’s Department and the Berkshire Mountain Search and Rescue Team have undertook extensive research for Marohn.

On Friday, September 2, Massachusetts State Police announced that “State police and local authorities have located and recovered human remains believed to be those of 42-year-old Meghan Marohn.” They added that “on Thursday evening, a civilian discovered partial remains in a heavily wooded area near Fox Drive in Lee.”

Berkshire District Attorney’s Office Communications Director Andy McKeever told Dateline that over the weekend the Chief Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed the remains were in fact Meghan Marohn.

Peter Naple told NBC affiliate Newschannel 13 that she will be “missed by her family” and wants everyone to remember Meghan as a “deeply caring and dynamic person”.

The cause and manner of death have not yet been released in the case. The Berkshire District Attorney’s Office told Dateline the investigation is still ongoing.

Anyone with information regarding Meghan should contact Massachusetts State Police Detectives at 413-499-1112 or Lee Police at 413-243-5530.

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7 Maine Hiking Trails That Are No Dogs Allowed https://walkonmountain.com/7-maine-hiking-trails-that-are-no-dogs-allowed/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 14:15:09 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/7-maine-hiking-trails-that-are-no-dogs-allowed/ By Lindsay Putnam, Bangor Daily News Staff There’s no shortage of hiking trails in Maine that you can conquer with your four-legged friend. Many of the state’s most popular parks, including Acadia National Park, welcome dogs as long as they are on a leash. By Lindsay Putnam, Bangor Daily News Staff There’s no shortage of […]]]>

By Lindsay Putnam, Bangor Daily News Staff There’s no shortage of hiking trails in Maine that you can conquer with your four-legged friend. Many of the state’s most popular parks, including Acadia National Park, welcome dogs as long as they are on a leash.

By Lindsay Putnam, Bangor Daily News Staff

There’s no shortage of hiking trails in Maine that you can conquer with your four-legged friend.

Many of the state’s most popular parks, including Acadia National Park, welcome dogs as long as they are on a leash.

Generally, the only limiting factor for hiking with your dog will simply be the type of terrain and the distance your dog can handle.

But some hikers may want to look for hikes where they won’t encounter dogs. Whether it’s a personal preference or a desire to enjoy nature with minimal noise and interruptions, here’s where you can hike without worrying about dogs crossing your path.

Barred Island Reserve on Deer Isle

Located on the west side of Deer Isle, Barred Island Preserve offers approximately 1.5 miles of nature trails that wind through a whimsical boreal fog forest to a sandy beach on the coast. And if you time your visit just right, you can then cross a sandbar to explore scenic undeveloped Barred Island. There is no trail on Barred Island, but you can walk around the island on the large granite slabs that surround it. Take care when navigating the rocks, which become slippery closer to the water.

Borestone Mountain, in the 100 Mile Wilderness of Maine

Rising nearly 2,000 feet above sea level, Borestone Mountain is a popular hike in Maine’s 100-mile wilderness. From the two bald peaks of the mountain, hikers are rewarded with stunning 360 degree views of the area. This 4.2-mile, round-trip hike features more than 200 stone steps and a few metal rungs to help you climb the steeper sections.

Bangor Daily News file photo
BORESTONE MOUNTAIN – Steel rungs are located near the western peak of Borestone Mountain to help hikers climb particularly steep sections of the trail.

Fields Pond Audubon Center in Orrington

Straddling the border of Orrington and Holden, Fields Pond Audubon Center is a 229-acre wildlife preserve that is home to a network of nature trails, as well as a nature center where public programs are held regularly. It is one of eight sanctuaries owned and operated by Maine Audubon, the state’s oldest wildlife conservation organization. At least 130 species of birds have been spotted on the property.

Orono Bog walk in Orono and Bangor

The 1.6 mile boardwalk loop trail begins at the edge of the forested wetlands of the Bangor City Forest, which is lined with bog maples, cinnamon ferns and skunk cabbage. After 800 feet, the path crosses the city limit in the section of the bog belonging to the University of Maine at Orono. The path leads to the open center of the bog, an area covered in peat moss, stunted vegetation and fascinating plants such as the carnivorous pitcher plant. Benches are located at least every 200 feet. This boardwalk, along with the 0.25 mile wooded trail leading to it, is handicapped accessible and ideal for walkers. Only assistance dogs are allowed.

Fernald’s Neck Preserve in Lincolnville

The 328-acre Fernald’s Neck Preserve takes up much of a peninsula that juts out into Lake Megunticook, a beautiful body of water in Lincolnville and Camden. Established in 1969, the reserve is home to ancient evergreen forest, nearly 4 miles of shoreline, The Great Bog, and approximately 3.5 miles of walking trails. The main feature of the preserve is a large boulder called “Balance Rock” which is a short walk from the trailhead on the Blue Trail and the Yellow Trail. The orange trail and the end of the blue loop are rocky and hilly, making them the most difficult areas of the trail system.

Point-Blagden Indian Reservation in Bar Harbor

Located on the west side of Bar Harbor on the Indian Point Peninsula, the Indian Point-Blagden Preserve is home to approximately 2.7 miles of woodland hiking trails and a 1-mile gravel road that is also a scenic spot. nice to walk around. Trails on the property lead through mossy evergreen forest to the ocean where you’ll find interesting rock formations and an expansive gravel beach. The Fern Trail leads to an area of ​​shoreline dominated by outcrops of Ellsworth Shale, the oldest rock found on Mount Desert Island. The Shore Trail leads to a large gravel beach and another area of ​​outcrops, with offshore ledges frequented by harbor seals basking.

Debsconeag Ice Caves near Millinocket

The trail to the ice caves is just over a mile long and winds through tall pines and large boulders covered in moss and ferns. The caves are talus, that is to say a pile of large rocks that were assembled by glaciers during the last ice age. There are metal rungs, courtesy of the Nature Conservancy, to descend into the cave. As you descend, the temperature drops – a feeling a bit like stepping into a freezer. In spring and summer, the ice covering the walls of the caves begins to melt and form icicles. From the large main room, hikers can clamber over rocks and squeeze into smaller rooms – although this kind of exploration isn’t for people who are afraid of confined spaces. People wishing to spend time in the caves would be more comfortable bringing mittens and pants.

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Hiking Cadillac d’Acadie mountain in the dark is the best way to see the sunrise https://walkonmountain.com/hiking-cadillac-dacadie-mountain-in-the-dark-is-the-best-way-to-see-the-sunrise/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 15:24:16 +0000 https://walkonmountain.com/hiking-cadillac-dacadie-mountain-in-the-dark-is-the-best-way-to-see-the-sunrise/ Countless stars twinkled above our heads as we began our hike up Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park. The forest was dark and silent, the birds were still sleeping. The goal? Reach the summit before sunrise. That morning, I was guiding two people who were new to hiking. So I wanted to give us enough […]]]>

Countless stars twinkled above our heads as we began our hike up Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park. The forest was dark and silent, the birds were still sleeping.

The goal? Reach the summit before sunrise.

That morning, I was guiding two people who were new to hiking. So I wanted to give us enough time to reach the top. Based on previous hikes on the 2.2 mile Cadillac North Ridge Trail, I estimated it would take us about two hours. Sunrise was at 5:30, which gave us a 30 minute buffer.

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